Aging

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Two small companies are offering to buy life insurance policies at a percentage of face value.
Two small companies are offering to buy life insurance policies at a percentage of face value.
about 3 hours ago
Debra Drelich, a specialist in geriatric care, will answer questions about assisted living and other living arrangements for aging relatives.
Debra Drelich, a specialist in geriatric care, will answer questions about assisted living and other living arrangements for aging relatives.
about 5 hours ago
Besides being hurtful on an emotional level, a 2002 Yale University study on “elderspeak” revealed this startling result: it hurts life expectancy too.
Besides being hurtful on an emotional level, a 2002 Yale University study on “elderspeak” revealed this startling result: it hurts life expectancy too.
about 7 hours ago
Your mom and dad are showing signs that they are not acting as sharply as they once were, and you are slowly noticing the change. Dishes are starting to pile up, hygiene is beginning to decline and your parent or elder is starting to for...
Your mom and dad are showing signs that they are not acting as sharply as they once were, and you are slowly noticing the change. Dishes are starting to pile up, hygiene is beginning to decline and your parent or elder is starting to forget normal routines, monthly bill payments or their usual doctor appointments. Because you do not live with them, you are concerned the little signs are indications of larger issues. As we age our state of mind and physical condition changes and making adjustments guarantees a safer, more comfortable and happier living condition. Starting the Conversation Regardless of the state your senior is in, discussing caregiving options early on and jointly is vital. Your conversation approach should come from a calm, understanding place where you highlight the advantages and specific reasons to why you think additional help is necessary. Outlining and examining what they want compared to the needs you anticipate should bring all pieces to a level playing field. Shift to a more emotional method if your mom or dad becomes hostile. Really explain your worries and if you already act as the family caregiver, tell him or her how the stress is starting to affect your own life. After coming to some form of agreement, it is time to decide on the best caregiving service. Discussing Options  The aging population is growing rapidly, and the senior care industry is creating numerous solutions for families in need. Assisted living, nursing homes, in-home care, adult day care and respite care are all options to consider. It can sometimes be difficult to make the smartest choice, but that is why the whole family’s opinion needs to be considered. AARP asked baby boomers about their most desired location as they aged, and 80% of participants stated they wanted to stay in their own home instead of an assisted care facility. Staying at home is usually the most appealing due to the desired need for independence, and your family may prefer this solution. In-home care is the option that most greatly affects the entire family, and having a plan will make the transition go smoothly. How In-Home Care Affects You In-home care can come in three forms. The first circumstance is where the senior moves into your home. The second is where you check in on your mom and dad at their home. Finally, the third option includes the first or second option with additional respite care from a third party provider. Accommodating an additional person in your home affects your family. Rooms can be reassigned or your home may need remodeling for handicap accessibility, an extra room or a new user-friendly bathroom. Safety elements also need to be reviewed in your home’s current state. Emergency response systems, fall sensors and 24-hour monitoring structures are some of the common safety precautions installed in the home. Financial changes also need to be considered in all three types of in-home care. Home remodels, food, respite care, transportation and many other expenses could be subtracted from your household’s income. However, time is often the most overlooked element to in-home care services. Juggling your own personal life and household against added doctor appointments, mealtimes and errands can be difficult. Two schedules can be stressful on a family caregiver, so making sure the entire family is on board will also reduce the stress by finding the gaps between schedules. Why Open Communication? Taking on the responsibility and role of family caregiver is life changing. Resentment, hostility and stress-induced arguments can arise. Keeping the lines of communication open can reduce the negative tension between family members and help manage your new family dynamic. Working efficiently as a family allows things to run smoother and make for a happier home. For any additional questions, please contact us in the comments below. About the Author: Kym Clark, RN, BSN, CLNC, CSA is the Director of Home Care Services and Quality Administration for Com
about 7 hours ago
A new Web site aims to connect seniors and caregivers to community dental services.
A new Web site aims to connect seniors and caregivers to community dental services.
1 day ago
The University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community will host a workshop for aging services providers on Tuesday, October 15 from 9am to 3pm on the UIndy campus. Helping Professionals Help Older Adults Embrace a New Purpose: Rec...
The University of Indianapolis Center for Aging & Community will host a workshop for aging services providers on Tuesday, October 15 from 9am to 3pm on the UIndy campus. Helping Professionals Help Older Adults Embrace a New Purpose: Recreation & Volunteerism is designed to give people who work with older adults a better understanding of how to help their clients develop and pursue a full life through the pursuit of various leisure and volunteer activities.As we age, our purpose in life changes. This may be a result of retirement, changing relationships with adult children, and a realization that we are moving into a new phase of life. Whatever the impetus for that change, professionals who work with older adults can help their clients navigate the changes and identify a new, fulfilling purpose for themselves.RecreationThe morning session of this workshop will focus on recreation. Jeff Gilbert, Manager of the Denton Senior Center in Denton, TX, will join us to explore the broad definitions of "recreation," how to encourage older adults to find recreational activities they love and to embrace new experiences. Jeff will also discuss trends in older adult recreation -- just what DO the Baby Boomers want, as well as addressing the topic of developing recreational opportunities for different cultural groups of older adults.VolunteerismThe afternoon session will be conducted by Pat Gilbert, Network and Civic Engagement Director for The Oasis Institute. As part of the senior management team at the national headquarters, Pat provides leadership for volunteer engagement throughout the OASIS network, which encompasses 43 cities in 28 states. Pat has been a frequent presenter at the Aging in America Conference on volunteer engagement as a key strategy to increase organizational sustainability and social impact.*CEUs will not be offered for this event, however each participant will receive a certificate of completion.CostThe cost of the workshop, which includes materials, continental breakfast and lunch is only $20. Students may register for $10. (Proof of student status required.) To register, click here. These workshops were made possible by a generous contribution in memory of Nelle Worthington, long-time aging advocate and Indiana State Health Insurance Assistance Program employee.
2 days ago
The AgeWatch Index gives us a window on the world, through which we can learn and share new ways to meet the challenges of an aging population.
The AgeWatch Index gives us a window on the world, through which we can learn and share new ways to meet the challenges of an aging population.
2 days ago
As the days get colder and winter looms near it is important for seniors to limber up as well s layer up. One of many misconceptions about seniors and exercise is that seniors should rest and avoid too much strenuous activity during the ...
As the days get colder and winter looms near it is important for seniors to limber up as well s layer up. One of many misconceptions about seniors and exercise is that seniors should rest and avoid too much strenuous activity during the winter. This is in large part due to the increased chances seniors have of experiencing a fall during the winter time when the snow is thick and the ground can be slick. For many, the fear of falling is enough to make them go into hibernation during the winter and as a result live a much more sedentary lifestyle. While many seniors are less capable, or find it less convenient to get good exercise during the winter, one thing they must consistently do to remain healthy is stretch.  Stretching is not only a healthy practice in general but highly regarded anti-aging tip. Here are some of main benefits of stretching and how they can help seniors live healthier through the winter: Loosens and Lengthens the Muscles Stretching helps you maintain good balance by lengthening and loosening your muscles. Many seniors become more stiff due to less activity during the winter time and after a while this can make them more susceptible to falls. A good habit to get into is to stretch in the morning when you wake up or at the very least right before you go outside for long durations in the snow. Those who have already experienced an injury or are disabled should always use some sort of mobility aid with properly padded feet for the slick ground. Strengthens the Immune System by Promoting Healthy Blood Flow The variety of movements and angles in stretching helps to promote healthy blood flow to every part of your body. Getting that blood pumping and increasing circulation can be extremely beneficial to your immune system and decrease your chances of getting sick during the cold winter months. Longer, more thorough periods of stretching can even burn a decent amount of calories and serve as a subtle method of exercising. Joint Pain Relief Along with proper hydration, the joints need to have warm, loose muscles to support proper functioning. When the joint muscles become tight or weak it puts extra strain on the bones to support the body as you move, consequently as we get older our joints tend to ache more due to the strain put on them by the lack of proper muscle function. When you loosen up those tight muscles that support your joints, overtime you will find you can move much more smoothly and fluidly without joint pain. Makes you more Energized and Eager to be Active Ever notice that you always feel a little more spring after a good stretching period. Now that you’ve loosened up and got the blood pumping you feel like you are ready to do something active. AS mentioned above stretching in the morning is a good habit to get into so that you feel energized and ready to take on the day. In addition to stretching, a healthy diet, and adequate hydration are essential for keeping you healthy through those cold winter months. Always try to find a way to remain active for a small period every day and keep that metabolism going, even if the activity is modest. Taking care of your muscles through stretching is as important during the winter as taking of your body in eating. Roll those feet out of bed, reach your hands to the ceiling and then reach down to touch your toes. Sit down on the floor, fold your leg over and stretch that stiff hip. Prepare your body for an active day and you’ll keep age and sickness away. About the Author  Cheryl Swanson is a writer for the rollator supplier Just Walkers. As a both a writer and personal trainer to the elderly she enjoys sharing her knowledge and experience to help seniors stay active on their feet.
2 days ago
The parole of Anthony D. Marshall, son of the late socialite Brooke Astor, raises concern among some experts that financial abuse of the elderly still is not being taken seriously enough.
The parole of Anthony D. Marshall, son of the late socialite Brooke Astor, raises concern among some experts that financial abuse of the elderly still is not being taken seriously enough.
5 days ago
Get highlights from this week's top trending discussion about the emotional aspects of aging and caregiving.
Get highlights from this week's top trending discussion about the emotional aspects of aging and caregiving.
5 days ago