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Folk Art Man Kicks Mule. What is left of a "Man Kicks Mule" Whirligig. Intricate mechanism inside allows the arm to be pulled down producing a firm kick in the rear. Circa 1930? Collection Jim Linderman
Folk Art Man Kicks Mule. What is left of a "Man Kicks Mule" Whirligig. Intricate mechanism inside allows the arm to be pulled down producing a firm kick in the rear. Circa 1930? Collection Jim Linderman
about 2 hours ago
Asian treasures on display at Vietnam History Museum VietNamNet Bridge - An exhibition entitled “Asia-Colorful Culture” will open on October 8 at the Vietnam National Museum of History, displaying nearly 100 ancient treasures of many ...
Asian treasures on display at Vietnam History Museum VietNamNet Bridge - An exhibition entitled “Asia-Colorful Culture” will open on October 8 at the Vietnam National Museum of History, displaying nearly 100 ancient treasures of many Asian countries like India, South Korea, Indonesia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and China. The exhibits include architectural materials, household appliances, ornaments, and worship objects made from such materials as bronze, clay, stone, terra cotta, wood, silver, gem and ivory. The host country’s exhibits are bronze worship objects dating back to the Le-Nguyen Dynasty in the 15th-19th century. The exhibition will run through January 2014. The exhibition is held on the occasion of the 4th Conference of Asian National Museum Association 2013 (ANMA 4). The event, with the theme “Museums Contribute to Social Change,” will take place from October 7-9 at the Vietnam National Museum of History. This item is made of gold, pearl and crystal (Vietnam, Nguyen Dynasty, 19-20th centuries). Pottery vase of Vietnam, Later Le Dynasty, 15th century. This item was salvaged from an ancient shipwreck in Cham Island, Hoi An twon, Quang Nam province. Earrings made of gem stone and glass of Vietnam, Sa Huynh culture, about 2500-2000 years ago. Earrings made of gem stone and glass of Vietnam, Dong Nai culture, about 2500-2000 years ago, from the Giong Ca Vo archaelogical site in Ho Chi Minh City. The Vishnu of Cambodia, Angkor period, 11-12th centuries. Wooden statue of a dancer of Cambodia, 19-20th centuries. Silver enamel inlaid bowl of Cambodia, 19th century. Rectangular box decorated with leaf and geometric patterns, made of wood inlaid with mother-of-pearl of Cambodia, 19th century. Polygonal box decorated with flowers and geometric patterns, made of wood inlaid with mother-of-pearl and glass of Cambodia, 19th century. Pen holder carved with 18 Buddhas of China, the Qing Dynasty, Qianlong reign (1736-1795). The gem item from China, the Qing Dynasty, 18th century. Pillow made of gem from China, the Qing Dynasty, 18th century. Avalokitesvara stone reliefs of India, Pala Empire, the 10th century. Bronze statue of Kuan-yin of India in the 17-18th centuries. Colorful ceramic plates of Japan, Edo period, Kutani style, 17-18th centuries. Shiva on the back of Nandin bull statue, made of gold-plated bronze of Thailand, 19th century. Silver bowl of Thai Lan, Chakri period, 19th century. Bencharong multi-colored ceramic bowl of Thailand, the Chakri period, 18-19th centuries. T. Le
about 5 hours ago
On the one hand, preach it, Brother Ruskin! So true, so true. On the other, this sentiment is buried by John Ruskin in a footnote on page 93 of the fifth volume of Modern Painters (1860), meaning somewhere around the 1,850th page of th...
On the one hand, preach it, Brother Ruskin! So true, so true. On the other, this sentiment is buried by John Ruskin in a footnote on page 93 of the fifth volume of Modern Painters (1860), meaning somewhere around the 1,850th page of the entire monumental work, about 2,300 pages in the 19th century edition I read.The first volume of Modern Painters was supposed to be the only one. The 24 year-old Oxford punk meant the book to be a defense of the reputation and artistry of J. M. W. Turner, 68 at the time, but he soon discovered that it was impossible to understand Turner’s paintings - really, really understand them – without exploring taste, truth, beauty, perception, geology, botany, atmospheric science, and to a limited degree art history, among many other topics. The subtitle of the third volume (1856) is “Of Many Things,” a title both accurate and useless, but perhaps more inviting than that of the fourth volume (also 1856), “Of Mountain Beauty,” 497 pages on just what it says.So I detect irony, that is what I am trying to say. “No use to write them.” I will come back to this idea.During the seventeen years it took to write Modern Painters, Ruskin also wrote the three volumes of The Stones of Venice (1851-3), masterful 1,500 page sequel or supplement or appendix to Modern Painters (or vice versa) and several other works that I have not read. His final delay came from a request by the National Gallery to organize and catalogue the huge mass of Turner drawings the artist had bequeathed to the nation.In seven tin boxes in the lower room of the National Gallery I found upwards of nineteen thousand pieces of paper, drawn upon by Turner in one way or another. Many on both sides; some with four, five, or six subjects on each side (the pencil point digging spiritedly through from the foregrounds of the front into the tender pieces of sky on the back); some in chalk, which the touch of the finger would sweep away; others in ink, rotted into holes; others (some splendid colored drawings among them) long eaten away by damp and mildew, and falling into dust at the edges, in capes and bays of fragile decay… (Vol. 5, Preface)How I would love to continue that quotation. Ruskin should have been offered a baronetcy for his efforts.Over the last six years, I read Modern Painters, The Stones of Venice, and a couple of shorter Ruskin books, which would feel like an accomplishment if moving one’s eyes across a page of text and flipping pages were in and of itself so difficult. I have written about Ruskin in fragments over that time, as needed, as useful, but never in a concentrated burst, which is what I will do this week, without argument or goal, but simply as a pleasant rummage through the book in front of me, the fourth and fifth volumes of John Ruskin’s Modern Painters.I’ll get this out of the way here: reading all of Modern Painters and The Stones of Venice is Much Too Much, certainly, but the abridgements I looked at were Not Nearly Enough. Much great writing is omitted. I do not have an answer. The Stones of Venice is the more interesting of the two books.
M
about 10 hours ago
I'm finding it hard to write this post because so many things happened this Fall at the Antique Show so I wasn't sure where to start. First up, it was so hot...I think it was one of the hottest shows we've had in a long time and I've do...
I'm finding it hard to write this post because so many things happened this Fall at the Antique Show so I wasn't sure where to start. First up, it was so hot...I think it was one of the hottest shows we've had in a long time and I've done some pretty hot shows this year (hot, not meaning in a good way?). The humidity was just aweful. It made those out at the show not really want to shop. You just can't think straight when you are so hot. I heard that someone actually passed out from the heat. I think crowds were down some, even though I saw many people pass my tent daily. They seemed to be in a hurry to get somewhere, possibly to air conditioning.Then the rain came and flooded my booth and we had to deal with this. Once the rain stopped it made it almost unbearably hot again. We had hoped it would cool it off. Of course, we've had to deal with this many times at the shows. You just have to plan for all aspects of the weather because you can never predict the weather. One of the highlights of my show was getting to meet Korie Robertson of the Duck Dynasty Clan. It was during the Blog Party and she was passing my tent. I had heard that all three wives of the show were out shopping but I only saw her with a few others from the show. Speaking of the Blog Party, I am so thankful for all those that came out to the party. We had a great crowd at the party. We always have a great time no matter what. Thanks to all the customers that shopped with us and to those that stopped in to say hello.Overall, we had a decent show. I also had some things happen at this show that made it hard to continue to keep a smile on my face. Sometimes it's true that God will put you through a test and I do believe I was tested many times in the last two weeks. I did take a few pics of my booth, but my pics didn't seem to turn out as well as the others listed below. Possibly because I too was too hot to try to focus on things. Check out these:Sarah with Barn Chic Antiques,Lisa with Peace, Love, and all the Good Stuff, and Ashley with Ashley's Finds:They all did the best at reporting on Round Top/Warrenton. Please click on their blogs to see pics of my space and to read about their experience here. You'll really enjoy their take on the shows.I'm already hoping, praying, and planning for a better Spring 2014 Show. Keep watching for details about this. Hope to see you at the next show, which is in a week and half at The City Wide Garage Sale in Austin Texas on Oct. 19-20.
about 14 hours ago
Now that Junior Senator Crazy Cruz has somehow achieved the impossible: becoming as hated as it took fellow Republican Dick Nixon DECADES to do…the debt looms over us like never before. Cruz, formerly best known as an advisor to George...
Now that Junior Senator Crazy Cruz has somehow achieved the impossible: becoming as hated as it took fellow Republican Dick Nixon DECADES to do…the debt looms over us like never before. Cruz, formerly best known as an advisor to George Bush (the little one) also of Texas (purportedly) he is now widely recognized as the biggest fruity pebble in the box. So it is appropriate Texas has offered to pay off the Chinese with the biggest bucks in history, the 5 times the size of regular dollars "Houston Bucks" each of which is worth one million dollars, and fully backed by the bank of the memory of Sam Houston! With the motto "The Eyes of Texas" (are upon you) the huge currency lauds the city, but omits that the state has 25 million inhabitants without health insurance. Not to matter! With money like this, every one of us can afford even a hangnail with one bill! BIGass Houston Dollar 1952 Premier Printing Houston Collection Jim Linderman
1 day ago
For a long time M. Lokeswara Rao chose to depict the environs of forests on his canvases he clearly knew on account of being an Indian Forest Service Officer. Moving on to fresher subjects, the IFS officer-cum-painter has based his la...
For a long time M. Lokeswara Rao chose to depict the environs of forests on his canvases he clearly knew on account of being an Indian Forest Service Officer. Moving on to fresher subjects, the IFS officer-cum-painter has based his latest set of works on Buddha. This collection was recently showcased at the Tea Lounge in Taj Palace. “The first thing that Buddha does to one is bring peace of mind. To quote Pandit Jawahar Lal Nehru, ‘We live in an age of conflict and war, of hatred and violence, all over the world. Never before has the need been greater for all of us to remember the immortal message of Lord Buddha’,” says Rao explaining his theme. For Rao, Buddhism is an institution and not just a religion. On display were 30 works in acrylic, each inspired by different symbols of Buddhism like conch, lotus, unending knot, dharma chakra etc. Buddha Abhishekam, one of Rao’s favourites, had Buddha with kesar and chandan water, falling on his head, with some leaves of peepal tree in the background. One of the works was just done in dots sans any lines for which the artist had used acrylic glitters. For another favourite work of his ‘Buddha Pada’, he says, “Buddha did not visit some of the countries where Buddhism was preached so they took Buddha’s feet with them, and it signified the unending knot.” Lotus was a recurring motif in many of the works. The painting with four lotuses was inspired from Tibetan Buddhism which signifies the change in our state of minds from stressful to peaceful ones. IFS officer and painter M. Lokeswara Rao depicts all that Buddha stands for
1 day ago
Chinese Leisure Seal with Scholar Old Chinese leisure seal with a scholar reading a book as handle. As actual seal 2 characters are engraved: xing su ?? (quite go) Side engraving with Details and artist’s name Ke ting shan ren. ...
Chinese Leisure Seal with Scholar Old Chinese leisure seal with a scholar reading a book as handle. As actual seal 2 characters are engraved: xing su ?? (quite go) Side engraving with Details and artist’s name Ke ting shan ren. ???? 21 x 13 x 94 mm, good condition. More old Chinese seals: HERE
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