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Just shipped a new release of RestSharp to NuGet. For those who don’t know, RestSharp is a simple REST and HTTP API Client for .NET. This release is primarily a bug fix release with a whole lotta bug fixes. It should be fully compatible...
Just shipped a new release of RestSharp to NuGet. For those who don’t know, RestSharp is a simple REST and HTTP API Client for .NET. This release is primarily a bug fix release with a whole lotta bug fixes. It should be fully compatible with the previous version. If it’s not, I’m sorry. Some highlights: Added Task Overloads for async requests Serialization bug fixes ClientCertificate bug fix for Mono And many more bug fixes… Full release notes are up on GitHub. If you’re interested in the nitty gritty, you can see every commit that made it into this release using the GitHub compare view. I want to send a big thanks to everyone who contributed to this release. You should feel proud of your contribution! Who are you and what did you do to Sheehan?! Don’t worry! John Sheehan is safe and sound in an undisclosed location. Ha! I kid. I’m beating him senseless every day. Seriously though, if you use RestSharp, you should buy John Sheehan a beer. Though get in line as Paul Betts owes him at least five beers. John started RestSharp four years ago and has shepherded it well for a very long time. But a while back he decided to focus more on other technologies. Even so, he held on for a long time tending to his baby even amidst a lot of frustrations, until he finally stopped contributing and left it to the community to handle. And the community did. Various other folks started taking stewardship of the project and it continued along. This is the beauty of open source. We at GitHub use RestSharp for the GitHub for Windows application. A little while back, I noticed people stopped reviewing and accepting my pull requests. Turns out the project was temporarily abandoned. So Sheehan gave me commit access and I took the helm getting our bug fixes in as well as reviewing and accepting the many dormant pull requests. That’s why I’m here. Why RestSharp when there’s HttpClient? Very good question! System.Net.HttpClient is only available for .NET 4.5. There’s the Portable Class Library (PCL) version, but that is encumbered by silly platform restrictions. I’ve written before that this is harms .NET. I am hopeful they will eventually change it. RestSharp is unencumbered by platform restrictions - another beautiful thing about open source. So until Microsoft fixes the licensing on HttpClient, RestSharp is one of the only options for a portable, multi-platform, unencumbered, fully open source HTTP client you can use in all of your applications today. Want to build the next great iOS app using Xamarin tools? Feel free to use RestSharp. Find a bug in using it on Mono? Send a pull request. The Future of RestSharp I’m not going to lie. I’m just providing a temporary foster home for RestSharp. When the HttpClient licensing is fixed, I may switch to that and stop shepherding RestSharp. I fully expect others will come along and take it to the next level. Of course it really depends on the feature set it supplies and whether they open source it. As they say, open source is about scratching an itch. Right now, I’m scratching the “we need fixes in RestSharp” itch. When I no longer have that itch, I’ll hand it off to the next person who has the itch. But while I’m here, I’m going to fix things up and make them better.
about 20 hours ago
The first GitHub Data Challenge launched in 2012 and asked the following compelling question: what would you do with all this data about our coding habits? The GitHub public timeline is now easy to query and analyze. With hundreds of...
The first GitHub Data Challenge launched in 2012 and asked the following compelling question: what would you do with all this data about our coding habits? The GitHub public timeline is now easy to query and analyze. With hundreds of thousands of events in the timeline every day, there are countless stories to tell. Excited to play around with all this data? We'd love to see what you come up with. It was so successful, we did it again this past April. One of those projects really caught my eye, a site that analysise Popular Coding Conventions on GitHub. It ended up winning second place. It analyzes GitHub and provides interesting graphs on which coding conventions are more popular among GitHub users based on analyzing the code. This lets you fight your ever present software religious wars with some data. For example, here’s how the Tabs vs Spaces debate lands among Java developers on GitHub. With that, I’m sure nobody ever will argue tabs over spaces again right? RIGHT?! What about C#?! Sadly, there is no support for C# yet. I logged an issue in the repository about that a while back and was asked to provide examples of C# conventions. I finally got around to it today. I simply converted the Java examples to C# and added one or two that I’ve debated with my co-workers. However, to get this done faster, perhaps one of you would be willing to add a simple CSharp convention parser to this project. Here’s a list of the current parsers that can be used as the basis for a new one. Please please please somebody step up and write that parser. That way I can show my co-worker Paul Betts the error of his naming ways.
2 days ago
I avoid mailing lists the same way I avoid fun activities like meetings and pouring lemon juice into bloody scrapes. Even so, I still somehow end up subscribed to one or two. Even worse, once in a while, despite my better judgment, I sen...
I avoid mailing lists the same way I avoid fun activities like meetings and pouring lemon juice into bloody scrapes. Even so, I still somehow end up subscribed to one or two. Even worse, once in a while, despite my better judgment, I send an email to such a list and am quickly punished for my transgression with an onslaught of out of office auto replies. You know the type: Hey there friend! Thanks for your email! No seriously, I’m thanking you even though I haven’t read it. I’m sure it’s important because I’m important. Unfortunately (for you), I’m off to some island paradise drinking one too many Mai Tais and probably making an ass of myself. If you need to reach me, you can’t, LOL! You can contact this list of people you don’t know in my absence. Good luck with that! Wait till you see the punishment for sending an email during the holidays! Photo by: Tomas Alexsiejunas license: CC BY 2.0 If you have such a rule set up, let me humbly offer you a friendly constructive tip: NOBODY FUCKING CARES! The universe has gone on for around 14 billion years before you were born just fine. And chances are, it’ll continue to survive after your death for another 100 googol years until the entropy death of the last proton, or another universe inflates to take its place. Whichever comes first. So in the grand scheme of things, nobody cares that you’re out of the office, on vacation, or worse, too busy to respond to email so you automatically send me one as if I have all the time in the world to deal with more email. Ok, that might have come across as a eensy weensy bit ranty. I’ll try to tone it down and offer something more constructive. After all, I’ve probably been guilty of this in my past and I apologize and have paid my penance (see photo above). Maybe there’s a tiny bit of a purpose The first time I experienced widespread use of out-of-office replies is during my time at Microsoft. And to be fair, it does serve a small purpose. While 99.999999% of the world doesn’t care if you’re out of the office (that’s science folks), sometimes someone has a legitimate need to know who they should contact instead of you. For example, at Microsoft, I had an internal reply set up that directed emails to my manager. The lucky guy. Fortunately for those using Outlook with Exchange, you can choose a different reply for internal emails than external emails. So definitely go and do that. The two email rule of out-of-office replies But what about the rest of us who really don’t care? I offer the following simple idea: If you must have an out-of-office auto reply, create a rule to only send it when you receive two direct emails without a response. The idea here is that if I send you one email directly, I can probably wait for you to get back to respond. If I can’t, I’ll send you another “hey, bump!” email and then receive auto notice. After all, if I send you two emails, sending me one is fair game. Also, make sure you never ever ever send an auto-reply when you are not in the TO list. That rule alone will cut out billions of email list out-of-office spam. Ideally, the auto-reply should only occur if you’re the only one in the TO list. Chances are someone else in the TO list will know you’re gone and can reply to the others if necessary. Again, the two email rule could come into play here. In the meanwhile, I think I’m going to switch tactics. Spam me, I spam you. So I may respond to those auto-replies with something like: Dear So-and-so, Hey dude, thanks for letting me know that you’re not in your office. I bet you’re on a really important business trip and/or vacation! I bet you have such important things to do there! Me? Not so much. I wish I was on an important business trip and/or vacation. It turns out, I have nothing better to do than respond to your automatically generated email to me! Thank you so much for that. The fact that it had your name at the bottom of the email and my email address in the TO: list was
22 days ago
If you are like me, who don't get much chance to get your hands dirty in fine tuning sql server queries, then you must watch this videos. I am really thankful to this guy, who has posted such a useful videos. http://www.youtube.com...
If you are like me, who don't get much chance to get your hands dirty in fine tuning sql server queries, then you must watch this videos. I am really thankful to this guy, who has posted such a useful videos. http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2900t3sPCl1MZi88lYsRLUcSled8wAMU Frankly speaking their is lot of materials out their on this topic and I always avoid learning because of that.
25 days ago
There’s something about being outdoors in Alaska that inspires poetic thoughts. In my case it’s all bad poetry so I’ll spare you the nausea and just show a photo instead. This was taken descending from Flattop, a strenuous but easy clim...
There’s something about being outdoors in Alaska that inspires poetic thoughts. In my case it’s all bad poetry so I’ll spare you the nausea and just show a photo instead. This was taken descending from Flattop, a strenuous but easy climb. At the top, we couldn’t see more than ten yards because of the clouds. But as we descended, they suddenly cleared giving us a sliver of a view of the ocean and coastline. My first experience of Alaska was when my family moved out here from the tropical island of Guam. Yeah, it was a bit of a change. I went to high school there and returned to Anchorage every Christmas and Summer break during college. When I lived there, I was completely oblivious to the existence of a software community out here. But around four years ago, I brought my family out to visit my parents and on a whim gave a talk to the local .NET user group. This has become kind of a thing for me to try and find a local user group to speak at when I go on vacation. This summer, after subjecting my wife to back to back weeks of travel, I decided to give her a long overdue break from family duties and take my kids to Alaska. One benefit of working at a mostly distributed company is I can pretty much work from any location that has good internet. My parents were game to watch and entertain the kids while I worked from their house. Since I was up there, I also got in touch with folks about giving another talk. Unfortunately, the .NET user group had disbanded not long after I left. They assured me it wasn’t my fault. It turns out that it is very difficult to get good speakers up there. This isn’t too surprising. Alaska is pretty out-of-the way for most people. At the same time, it’s an amazing place to visit during the months of June and July. The days are long and sunny. There’s all sorts of outdoor activities to partake in. So if you’re a decent speaker passionate about technology and happen to find yourself up there for vacation or otherwise, let me know and I can put you in touch with some people who would love to have you give a talk. You can probably even write-off a portion of your vacation if the talk is related to your work (though you should talk to your tax person about that and don’t listen to me). They put together an ad-hoc event while I was there and we had around twenty-five or so people show up. It doesn’t sound like a lot, but it’s a pretty good number for Anchorage and they really appreciate it. Afterwards, I recommend going out for some Alaskan Amber. It’s quite a good beer! And definitely hike Flattop.
25 days ago
I have came across a useful site which will be helpful in generating C# Class from JSON File or URL. This will be very useful when you are using JsonConvert.DeserializeObject Method. http://json2csharp.com/
I have came across a useful site which will be helpful in generating C# Class from JSON File or URL. This will be very useful when you are using JsonConvert.DeserializeObject Method. http://json2csharp.com/
25 days ago
Following code will help you to generate JSON file from database table. //Get records from database var products = db.Products.ToList(); //Generate JSON from database data using (StringWriter writer = new StringWriter()) {     ...
Following code will help you to generate JSON file from database table. //Get records from database var products = db.Products.ToList(); //Generate JSON from database data using (StringWriter writer = new StringWriter()) {     // Json.Write sends a Json-encoded string to the writer.     System.Web.Helpers.Json.Write(products, writer);         // When ready, you can send the writer     // output
25 days ago
Recently I have learned good way to add column to sql server using database defensive programming technique from my co-worker.  All the credit for this blog post goes to him.  Thank you sir incase you are reading this blog post. (I have ...
Recently I have learned good way to add column to sql server using database defensive programming technique from my co-worker.  All the credit for this blog post goes to him.  Thank you sir incase you are reading this blog post. (I have purposefully avoid mentioning name of co-worker due to privacy reason.) Following example is very simple and self explanatory, Incase if you didn't get anything
about 1 month ago
This is the 2nd post out of my 10 post series of my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information. You can get that in Paperback(USA) andKindle(Worldwide). Running SQL Code When we run SQL code, it is oft...
This is the 2nd post out of my 10 post series of my 10th book – SQL Basics. Today will show the importance of data and information. You can get that in Paperback(USA) andKindle(Worldwide). Running SQL Code When we run SQL code, it is often a series of SQL statements created by someone else. Still […]...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.
about 1 month ago
ASP.NET 4.5 web forms support model binding features. Additionally they can make use of model validation using data annotation validators. The validation errors thrown by data annotation validators can be easily displayed in a web form u...
ASP.NET 4.5 web forms support model binding features. Additionally they can make use of model validation using data annotation validators. The validation errors thrown by data annotation validators can be easily displayed in a web form using ValiationSummary control. While this arrangement works great, at times you want something customized. This article shows how model errors can be displayed inside a GridView column. You can use similar technique for other databound controls such as DetailsView...Did you know that DotNetSlackers also publishes .net articles written by top known .net Authors? We already have over 80 articles in several categories including Silverlight. Take a look: here.
about 1 month ago