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There is news on the LADEE mission. I got a kick out of the SpaceRef entry, made it sound like a secret. Oh yes, I know the gov”shutdown” and all, spacecraft controllers are “essential”, right? I would hope so any...
There is news on the LADEE mission. I got a kick out of the SpaceRef entry, made it sound like a secret. Oh yes, I know the gov”shutdown” and all, spacecraft controllers are “essential”, right? I would hope so anyway. Good news just the same. From SpaceRef: According to someone at NASA: “Early this morning (October 6), we fired LADEE’s main engine in a braking maneuver known as the Lunar Orbit Insertion (LOI) burn.” “This slowed the spacecraft’s velocity enough for it to be captured by the Moon’s gravity. This critical burn went flawlessly and LADEE is now in lunar orbit! Two more main engine burns, on October 9 and 12 will adjust LADEE’s trajectory, settling it into its commissioning orbit.” There should be two more orbital adjustment burns, one today, October 9th and the third on October 12 when LADEE should be close to the 250 km (155 mile) altitude goal. After the low orbit has been achieved the 30 day commissioning of the three science instruments begins, sensors are exposed and the laser communication demonstration of high-speed optical communications will start.  It will be fun to see how the laser communications works out. After the commissioning phase the mission begins. Hopefully the bickering in the government will be over with and the mission teams can get to work. We shall see. Image: NASA
about 2 hours ago
The smartphone is slowly becoming an invaluable tool for a photographer thanks to a growing number of photography apps that make use of its hardware and computing capabilities. There are apps, for both Android and iOS, that add to the pi...
The smartphone is slowly becoming an invaluable tool for a photographer thanks to a growing number of photography apps that make use of its hardware and computing capabilities. There are apps, for both Android and iOS, that add to the picture taking experience on smartphones like apps for camera enhancement, photo editing, and photo sharing. The most popular of such apps include Pixlr, Cymera, Adobe Photoshop Express, Instagram, Snapseed, 500px, and many others. This article is not about such apps. This article is about Android apps that help a photographer in using the smartphone as a tool to aid him in photography in various different ways. All the apps listed here are free but most of them have paid versions with additional features. 1. Photo Tools If there is one app that every photographer should consider, it has got to be this one. This app bundles all sorts of essential photography tools in one place. There are tools to calculate depth of field, hyperfocal distance, field of view, exposure, and flash exposure among others. There are weather tools like the Sunny 16 (EV) calculator, blue and golden hour calculator, and the moon phase and exposure calculator. There are also a lot of other tools too that you might find useful. 2. DoF Calculator This is a great app to help you quickly calculate the depth of field for a particular focal length and aperture. There are four different modes – simple, advanced, reverse, Av. The app supports most SLRs, DSLRs, and compact cameras from all major brands. It also tells you the hyperfocal distance which can prove useful in landscape photography. 3. DSLR Remote This app allows you to use your smartphone as a remote control for your DSLR camera via infrared, cable, or Bluetooth. It’s great for use as a remote shutter release, or as a timer. It can also be of good use as an intervalometer to capture time-lapse photographs. 4. LightMeter Free As the name suggests, this app allows the smartphone to be used as a light meter to measure exposure. It features incident light metering which requires a light sensor in the phone, and reflected light metering (requires a camera in the phone) but is not compatible with all models. 5. Sun Surveyor Lite This app is useful in location scouting for landscape photography as it predicts and visualizes the Sun’s trajectory, as well as Sunrise and Sunset positions. It’s useful in pre-visualizing and planning for the ‘golden hour’ using the 3D compass where the Sun’s position and orientation are shown on a map at the selected location. If you are looking for an app that predicts Moon path and phase, there is a cool app called Moon Trajectory.net. 6. Photoshop Tutorials Free There is always something new to learn in Photoshop. If you are looking for tutorials on the go, this is a good app. This app provides a wide variety of Photoshop tutorials and tips. The tutorials are not in the form of videos but text and images, which helps limit unnecessary data download. 7. Right Click For those who want to learn the fundamentals of photography, this app is a great starting place. It helps you to visually understand the effect of aperture, shutter speed and ISO on an image and also lists the basics of various photography styles like landscape, sports, portraits, and others. For advanced and more ‘serious’ photography lessons, there are some great paid apps like Photography Trainer, Photo Academy, and PhotoCaddy. 8. Map-A-Pic Location Scout We are always scouting for photographic locations and wouldn’t it be nice if you never forgot a great location for photography? This app does just that. It helps you save your photographic locations and scout for great locations that have been saved by other users. 9. Digi-Review – Cameras & Lenses If you are someone who wants to keep an updated list of all cameras, lenses and accessories from all major brands at your fingertips, this app is for you. It currently lists models from Canon, Nikon, Sony, Oly
about 22 hours ago
The Juno spacecraft will make a very close flyby of Earth tomorrow as it gains a gravitational boost in speed along its way to Jupiter. There will be a lot of data collected including images from the JunoCam observations of the Moon and ...
The Juno spacecraft will make a very close flyby of Earth tomorrow as it gains a gravitational boost in speed along its way to Jupiter. There will be a lot of data collected including images from the JunoCam observations of the Moon and Earth. The closest part of the flyby will bring the spacecraft to just 559 km / 347 miles at 19:25 UTC. Will we ever see the data? Eventually, it’s a question of how long we will have to wait. If you happen to be a ham radio operator you can participate. Video
1 day ago
After images are added to the database they are cataloged to provide metadata. Note that the number of records returned by the link will be less than the number of newly cataloged photographs if some of those cataloged photographs have ...
After images are added to the database they are cataloged to provide metadata. Note that the number of records returned by the link will be less than the number of newly cataloged photographs if some of those cataloged photographs have no digital image available.
1 day ago
Images are added to the database prior to being cataloged for metadata. This makes them available for viewing while the catalog process is in work.
Images are added to the database prior to being cataloged for metadata. This makes them available for viewing while the catalog process is in work.
1 day ago
The First Quarter Moon is Saturday October 12. Mars and Jupiter are prominent in the early morning. Venus is easily visible in the western evening sky with Mercury below it. Saturn lowers in the evening sky. Venus comes close to the b...
The First Quarter Moon is Saturday October 12. Mars and Jupiter are prominent in the early morning. Venus is easily visible in the western evening sky with Mercury below it. Saturn lowers in the evening sky. Venus comes close to the bright star Antares. Comet C/2012 S1 ISON visible in telescopes close to Mars.The First Quarter Moon is Saturday October 12. The Moon is at Perigee on the 11th.Evening sky looking west as seen from Adelaide at 20:00 pm ACDST on Thursday October 17. Venus is quite high in the evening sky above Saturn and Mercury, with the Moon just above the pair. The insets shows the telescopic view of Venus and Mercury at this time. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local times. Click to embiggen.Venus climbs higher in the evening twilight. It can easily be seen 20 minutes after sunset (indeed, with a little effort you can see it before sunset). The brightest (spectacularly so) object above the western horizon it is visible up to two hours or more after sunset (depending on how flat your western horizon is).Venus traverses the head of the Scorpion and comes close to the bright star Antares. It is a distinct gibbous shape in even small telescopesMercury is now easily visible in the evening twilight. Mercury climbs higher in the evening sky this week heading heading for Saturn. The pair are close on the 7th. Mercury is highest in the sky on the 9th, and will return towards the horizon after this. Saturn is still visible above the western horizon in the early evening twilight in the constellation of Virgo. Telescopic views of the ringed world are progressively harder as the planet gets lower in the sky and deeper in the twilight. Saturn sets around 9:00 pm local daylight saving time.Neptune is passed opposition, and still visible in strong binoculars. Location maps here which can be used in conjunction with the printable PDF maps below. My images with a little point and shoot camera here. Morning sky on Tuesday October 15 looking north-east as seen from Adelaide at 5:30 am ACST in South Australia. Jupiter is close to the star Wassat. Comet C/2012 S1 ISON is below Mars, and visible in amateur telescopes. The inset shows the view of Jupiter through a telescope at this time. Similar views will be seen elsewhere at the equivalent local time (click to embiggen).Jupiter is in the constellation Gemini. Mars is is in the constellation of Leo.Mars rises still higher in the morning twilight, and is visible well before twilight. Mars comes closer to the bright star Regulus and is closest between the15th and 17th .Jupiter is now well above the north-eastern horizon, above and well to to the left of Mars. It is quite easy to see in the morning sky well into the twilight. During the week Jupiter rises higher and draws away from the moderately bright star Wassat. Jupiter's Moons are now readily visible in binoculars.Comet C/2012 S1 ISON is expected to become very bright in late November Early December. Currently it is visible in modest amateur instruments such as 12" reflecting telescopes. The image to the left shows a high power view of the region around Mars with ISON (expanded from the unaided eye view above).While the comet will be around magnitude 10 at the beginning of October and around 8.6-9 mid October, it is never very high at Astronomical twilight (5 and 7 degrees above the horizon in most of Australia). The horizon murk means that that it will be mid October before the comet is visible in smaller telescopes such as 4" reflectors and late October for strong binoculars.The comet is just below and to the left of Mars (one degree and 2 arc seconds), making finding it relatively easy. Comet ISON was closest to Mars on October 1, but the orbital geometry means that from Earth it will appear closest on the 15th. There are lots of interesting things in the sky to view with a telescope. Especially with Venus so prominent in the sky. If you don't ha
1 day ago
Tonight (October 7 - 8) is the peak of the Draconids meteor shower. It is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour during the peak, but some meteors can be seen one day before and after the peak. It originates from ...
Tonight (October 7 - 8) is the peak of the Draconids meteor shower. It is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour during the peak, but some meteors can be seen one day before and after the peak. It originates from dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900. Continue reading →
2 days ago
The mighty lion. It is ferocious, majestic, and powerful. It’s the king of the jungle for a good reason. Despite the high intimidation factor associated with lions, they’re extremely popular with humans. When kids visit the zoo, lions ar...
The mighty lion. It is ferocious, majestic, and powerful. It’s the king of the jungle for a good reason. Despite the high intimidation factor associated with lions, they’re extremely popular with humans. When kids visit the zoo, lions are usually near the top of the list of animals they want to see first. And people who go on safari know that the lions are the main draw, even if they won’t admit it outright. Yeah, landscapes, elephants, wildebeests, whatever. It’s all about the lions. Because they’re spectacularly photogenic. Here’s proof. Yo El Rey by flickrohit, on Flickr Tree climbing Lion in Uganda 0186 by Merv Colton, on Flickr Lion: Panthera leo by Pius Mahimbi, on Flickr lazy lion || Fauler Löwe by paraflyer, on Flickr Lion Eyes by puliarf, on Flickr Keeping a Watchful Eye by Ian Sane, on Flickr Slowly… back… away by JustinJensen, on Flickr A nice portrait of one of the brothers by Tambako the Jaguar, on Flickr Mr. Lonely by Ali -Arsh, on Flickr The Lion ‘King’ by jinterwas, on Flickr Hungry by *~Dawn~*, on Flickr Little Lion by GIO®D@NO™, on Flickr Brothers nose to nose by Tambako the Jaguar, on Flickr His Royal Highness King Zawadi Mungu by Ian Sane, on Flickr An Elegant Predator by jDevaun, on Flickr Lioness Sunbathing by NZ Alex, on Flickr Open Wide! by left-hand, on Flickr Untitled by Good Eye Might, on Flickr On Lion’s Pond by jurvetson, on Flickr Daydreaming Of Africa by digitalART2, on Flickr King of the Jungle_Zoo by Todd Ryburn, on Flickr More Animal Photography Resources The Three Main Challenges of Zoo Photography The Beauty of the Super Long Telephoto Lens – Useful for animal photography too! 10 Tips to Improve Your Wildlife Photography 12 Great Online Tutorials on Wildlife Photography Author informationJason D. LittleJason Little is a photographer (shooting macros, portraits, candids, and the occasional landscape), part time writer, and full time lover of music. You can see Jason’s photography on his photography blog or on Flickr.TwitterFacebookBlogFlickrThe post 21 Majestic Photos of Lions appeared first on Light Stalking.
2 days ago
Neptune and Triton 3 days after flyby. Triton is smaller crescent and is the closer of the two. Credit: NASA Here’s a parting shot from the Voyager 2 spacecraft of the planet Neptune and its large moon Triton taken shortly after th...
Neptune and Triton 3 days after flyby. Triton is smaller crescent and is the closer of the two. Credit: NASA Here’s a parting shot from the Voyager 2 spacecraft of the planet Neptune and its large moon Triton taken shortly after the historic flyby of August 25, 1989. Triton is an odd moon. Inclined 23 degrees from the plane of Neptunes equator and orbiting the planet in the opposite direction of the planet’s rotation would seem to indicate Triton was captured by Neptune’s gravity and not formed with the planet. Many moons in the solar system are retrograde (mostly around Jupiter) but Triton is by far the largest, at 2,706 km, it’s not much smaller than our moon. Triton is very cold, only 38 Kelvin or – 235 C (-391 F). You’d think it would be frozen solid, yet the moon has a rather “young” surface. It is thought when the moon was captured it not unxepectedly had an eliptical orbit which became circular over time thanks to tidal forces from Neptune. The flexing and streching of the moon created heat in the interior of the moon and led to volcanic activity. Volcanic activity in this case would involve ices and not lava. Read more about Neptune here and Triton here.
2 days ago
Images are added to the database prior to being cataloged for metadata. This makes them available for viewing while the catalog process is in work.
Images are added to the database prior to being cataloged for metadata. This makes them available for viewing while the catalog process is in work.
2 days ago