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On Wednesday, 16 October, the University of Connecticut in Storrs will host a panel on “Gendered Publishing: The State of the Profession for Women Writers and Illustrators of Children’s Literature.” The discussion starts at 6:30 in the C...
On Wednesday, 16 October, the University of Connecticut in Storrs will host a panel on “Gendered Publishing: The State of the Profession for Women Writers and Illustrators of Children’s Literature.” The discussion starts at 6:30 in the Class of 1947 Room of the Homer Babbidge Library. Participants are:Barbara McClintock, author/illustrator Gene Kannenberg, Jr., director of ComicsResearch.orgLisa Rowe Fraustino, professor and department chair of English at Eastern Connecticut State University (ECSU) Susannah Richards, associate professor of Education at ECSU and member of the 2013 Newbery Award Committee On that recurring topic, last month The Horn Book published Martha Parravano’s essay “It’s Always Men’s Night at the Caldecott.” Since we live in the Most Overstated Era EVUH!, we can accept that Parravano’s “Always” actually referred to men winning the Caldecott Medal 63% of the time over seventy-five years. Over the last twenty years, male artists have been even more commonly rewarded: sixteen men and four women have won the Medal. However, a commenter signing on as “Scope Notes” noted:Total side note here, but an interesting thing I’ve found is that the Newbery has nearly identical numbers, but in reverse – 66% female to 34% male. Over the past twenty years, fourteen women and six men have won the Newbery Medal—again, a growing disparity. Of course, we should include a much harder factor to measure: how many men and women are writing or illustrating children’s books? Which gets us to another question: how many women and men are trying? I started attending SCBWI conferences about twenty years ago, and immediately saw how women outnumbered men in the audience. In organizing those conferences, we always ask the host hotel to turn a men’s bathroom into a ladies’ room for the day. Yet the gender ratio of people on the podium—i.e., the authors and artists who have achieved recognition in the field—is usually closer to parity. Adding to the complexity of the issue is how most parts of the children’s-literature chain—literary agencies, publishing departments, review journals, library staffs—are more female than male, though not as often at the top. And then there’s the question of who’s reading the most books.
about 1 hour ago
In case you missed them last week, check out our new batch of book reviews for October! Fourteen new titles were covered, spanning poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Find some great new fall reads, and look for next month's book reviews o...
In case you missed them last week, check out our new batch of book reviews for October! Fourteen new titles were covered, spanning poetry, fiction, and non-fiction. Find some great new fall reads, and look for next month's book reviews on November 1.
about 2 hours ago
Poor Emily Schultz. Her debut novel is getting trashed on Amazon — not because it’s a bad novel, but because a number of reviewers have confused her with Stephen King. (It doesn’t help that her magazine also shares a name with King...
Poor Emily Schultz. Her debut novel is getting trashed on Amazon — not because it’s a bad novel, but because a number of reviewers have confused her with Stephen King. (It doesn’t help that her magazine also shares a name with King’s novel.)
about 2 hours ago
Autumn is by far my favorite time of year. I feel like I say this a lot, but it’s absolutely true. Of course, I try to forget that the foreshadowing chill and shortened daylight means winter is not too far away. Those of you who li...
Autumn is by far my favorite time of year. I feel like I say this a lot, but it’s absolutely true. Of course, I try to forget that the foreshadowing chill and shortened daylight means winter is not too far away. Those of you who live in warm climates may not fully understand this fall phenomenon. However, the chai lattes, pumpkin pie, sweaters and changing colors of leaves just set the perfect mood for curling up with a great book and reading, don’t you think? Never mind the opportunity at the end of the month to finally BECOME your favorite literary character on Halloween! read more
about 2 hours ago
*waves* Remember me? About once every week I sit down to write a blog post and become convinced that this will be my return to blogging. That surely, now that I have written one, I will manage another one tomorrow. Alas, it seems that ke...
*waves* Remember me? About once every week I sit down to write a blog post and become convinced that this will be my return to blogging. That surely, now that I have written one, I will manage another one tomorrow. Alas, it seems that keeping up with the blog has become slightly more difficult lately. It does not mean that I will disappear, it just means that for the time being my blogging might remain a little irregular. Nonetheless, I shall strive to do better. Meanwhile, let me show you some picturesque pictures taken last weekend while we were on a trip to Friesland (possibly the flattest province in the Netherlands), and Frisian island Schiermonnikoog to celebrate my parents’ 25 year wedding anniversary. We had a lovely weekend, with a surprising amount of autumn sunshine. The only drawback was that I was suffering from a cold and trying not to let it get the best of me, which resulted in me having a complete breakdown each evening and the subsequent Monday. But oh well – it was a great weekend nonetheless. Lauwersmeer On the road to a lovely afternoon tea Look, it is Iris with a huge teapot! Afternoon tea at the Theefabriek One of the views from Schiermonnikoog Beach! Bas and I being silly on the beach.. Yes, there were grazing cows that we, in typical Dutch fashion, cycled among. So, this was possibly the most stereotypical-Dutch weekend I have ever had: cycling, cows, sunglasses in autumn while we celebrate that it is still 18 degrees celsius and that there was astonishingly little rain. What surprised me? How incredibly pretty some of the views were. Looking at the pictures now I might be tempted to admit that there is beauty to some of the Dutch scenery. Did you have a good weekend?
about 3 hours ago
As of this month, all of Susan Sontag’s books are available for purchase as e-books. This means you can grace your e-reader with The Benefactor, Sontag’s debut novel, as well as Against Interpretation, which contains the seminal es...
As of this month, all of Susan Sontag’s books are available for purchase as e-books. This means you can grace your e-reader with The Benefactor, Sontag’s debut novel, as well as Against Interpretation, which contains the seminal essay “Notes on Camp.”
about 3 hours ago
… The Autobiography of Jack the Ripper... | Sourcebooks.com.
… The Autobiography of Jack the Ripper... | Sourcebooks.com.
about 3 hours ago
The space to talk about the books you are reading, and find out which ones we are reviewing
The space to talk about the books you are reading, and find out which ones we are reviewing
about 3 hours ago
Today, I'm embarking on little bit of a new venture. I'll be reviewing a couple (or three or four, my mileage will I am sure vary) books a month over at Dear Author. These will be urban fantasy and parnormals, and I am so thrilled to be ...
Today, I'm embarking on little bit of a new venture. I'll be reviewing a couple (or three or four, my mileage will I am sure vary) books a month over at Dear Author. These will be urban fantasy and parnormals, and I am so thrilled to be leading off with the first book in an urban fantasy series that took over my life the minute I started it. Make sure to drop by today to see what I thought of J.C. Daniels' Blade Song.
about 3 hours ago
I'm finishing a new book: Spell Realm. Somewhat surprised to see that title has never been used.Anyway, I got through about 5/6th of the book and then lost faith in it. I've been eking out a couple of paragraphs a day since then.I'm t...
I'm finishing a new book: Spell Realm. Somewhat surprised to see that title has never been used.Anyway, I got through about 5/6th of the book and then lost faith in it. I've been eking out a couple of paragraphs a day since then.I'm thinking that all these fantasies I'm writing all have similar themes and I ought to just make them all one world. It will require some rewriting, but it isn't beyond my ability.Spell Realm is probably the first book of a trilogy that ends with Sometimes a Dragon. It will require that I rewrite SAD.Meanwhile, I've started thinking of a new book which might be the middle book, or it might be the first book in another trilogy.Meanwhile, I think my Lore books can be turned into Spell Realm books.I think what all this requires is a bunch of planning -- mapping it all out on a timeline, making everything consistent.Anyway, I read another 4 chapters of Spell Realm at writer's group last night, and it felt pretty good. It felt smooth. So I just need to push through to the end of the book in my next writing session, and then start drawing graphs and thinking it all through before I start anything else.
about 4 hours ago