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where can i purchase CAPUTO 00 (BLUE) FLOUR?Submitted by verve on October 9, 2013 - 8:04am. Hello,  I need to get my hands on caputo blu 00 pizza flour. the only place i found online is amazong and the sellers are charging more for deliv...
where can i purchase CAPUTO 00 (BLUE) FLOUR?Submitted by verve on October 9, 2013 - 8:04am. Hello,  I need to get my hands on caputo blu 00 pizza flour. the only place i found online is amazong and the sellers are charging more for delivery than the actual cost of the flour :-/  Is anyone on here holding a surplus maybe and would like to sell me 1-5 kilos of the flour? I'm desperate!!!!  I'm based in London.  Many thanks,  David
about 2 hours ago
4 Years have passedSubmitted by arlo on October 9, 2013 - 7:01am. I just finished my bake this morning;  the loaves came out of the WFO just lovely, and I am proud of the new night mixer I have trained and graciously added to the team. H...
4 Years have passedSubmitted by arlo on October 9, 2013 - 7:01am. I just finished my bake this morning;  the loaves came out of the WFO just lovely, and I am proud of the new night mixer I have trained and graciously added to the team. His end game isn't baking, in fact, its medical studies and the sort. But he mixes some amazing doughs consistently, and works very hard each shift. I appreciate his efforts, and have been reminding him daily that I find his work ethics impressive and honorable.An alarm went off on my phone at 3:30 a.m. this morning, I was already about two hours into my work day when I checked to see if it was a message from my partner telling me about her closing shift and how she is walking on her way home safely, or perhaps my Mother informing me of how my sick Grandmother was doing.Turns out that it was a reminder.Four years ago today I started my first position baking for a living. I remember exactly that moment too when I looked at the clock. I know, it sounds so movie-sentimental. But really, lately, everything I have been going through with my first Management position in the baking world...it has made me realize what I chose to do that day, and what it takes at times to follow something you love. I wonder if I would have done this if I knew how different professional can be from home at times!I remember waking up at 2:30 a.m. and being so bleary-foggy-headed that morning/night and thinking, "What on earth...", my fiance at the time rolling over and covering her head with a pillow because of my alarm ringing was thinking the same. But I did it! I awoke. From that day forth and still to this day, I have never been late for a 3:30 a.m., 2:30 a.m., 1:30 a.m. or even a 12:30 midnight shift at a bakery. I guess I was just born to do this kinda thing.It was chilly, I drove with my music blaring loudly, something punk rock I am sure, Dead Kennedys, Misfits, Minor Threat...something. That hasn't changed still to this day. No amount of tea or coffee could make my body understand why I was up right now. That really hasn't changed either. For a moment I asked myself what I was doing. I was a bread enthusiast, baked some loaves at home, took a class or two prior with my fiance, owned a few books on the topic, but I was a medical major in college and was working a nice paying job full-time as well. A nice paying job I quit to start something I didn't even know if I had the potential to do. I suppose it was the push from my fiance to do something I actually enjoyed instead of considering money and 'down-the-line' all the time. It also seemed so romantic -to bake bread for the community! Regardless, I pulled in to the Great Harvest to see a fellow already scaling some ingredients. He greeted me with a kind smile and the heat of the bakery hit me. I was welcomed kindly by two other bakers and the owner. I was to be put right to work mixing the first sponges and some pastries as well; muffins, scones, cookies. The morning moved quickly and I did a bit of everything that day; Mixing using a large hobart, scaling ingredients, prep work, shaping loaves, baking and taking home my first loaf of bread I 'professionally' baked. I could go more into detail about the exacts of my shift, but I'll hold off.Eight hours later though I was done and on my way home with a smile on my face, also a nap on my mind. When my Grandfather found out I was baking, he laughed. Before the war he baked in a European-minded bakery and always used to mention how hot the ovens were in the morning for the rye bake, and how he hated cleaning the pans more than anything. Suppose it is in the family too...The years passed and I continued to bake and learn more and more, never happy with my results, always striving for more. The following years saw me complete my degree in restaurant-hospitality management, become an ACF Pastry Chef, become a head-baker at a small shop, work a stint out of state, work another m
about 3 hours ago
First Ciabatta BakeSubmitted by rgt10 on October 9, 2013 - 6:37am. Good morning all, Yesterday I tried my hand at making this,http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2984/jasons-quick-coccodrillo-ciabatta-bread#comment-139806 Following the dire...
First Ciabatta BakeSubmitted by rgt10 on October 9, 2013 - 6:37am. Good morning all, Yesterday I tried my hand at making this,http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2984/jasons-quick-coccodrillo-ciabatta-bread#comment-139806 Following the directions to the letter, weighed all my ingredients, and ended up with these nice loaves on the second try.  I am totally enthralled with this recipe.  Its very nice to not need a set of stainless steel teeth to eat the crust. And the crumb is soft, moist and tastes very good.  This will be a wonderful dipping and sandwich bread for my wife and I.  I said earlier that this was my second batch of the day, well, after the initial mix, and 10 minute rest, I put in the dough hook and at speed 4 began mixing the dough.  About 4 minutes into the mix, I remembered that I had forgotten the salt.  So, stopped the mix, and added the salt.  This is where it all went bad on me.  Something about adding the salt at this point changed the properties of the dough.  It went from starting to become a nice smooth ball into a gloppy, pancake batter consistency.  I beat this at speed 4 for 40 minutes and it never balled up and came off the bowl sides.So, into the garbage it went.  I was determined to make this recipe.  Cleaned everything up, and started over.  Again, weighting all my ingredients, and following the recipe to the letter.  Mix, 10 minute rest, add salt, mix again this time at #6 speed on my KA.  Miracle of Miracles!!  At about 3 minutes, I had a wonderful ball of dough on the hook, all off the bowl sides, and starting to lift off the bottom of the bowl.  At about the 6 minute mark, all of the dough was on the hook, with none on the bowl sides or the bottom of the bowl.  At 8 minutes I stopped the mix, and put it into my proofing container.  1 1/2 hour proof, divide into 4 pcs and rough shape in baugettes.  Another 45 minutes to rise, and into a hot, hot oven on baking stones.Wonderful oven spring as you can see in the pictures.  My only complaint was that the crust got darker than I would have liked.  Next batch I may try a lower oven temp, say around 450, At this temp though, I dont know how long to bake them.  Any advise on time would be most appreciated.The wife and I made one loaf disappear at dinner in a matter of minutes.  Very nice bread, with a minimum of work involved.Thanks for looking.Roger
about 3 hours ago
I know that guy!Submitted by PMcCool on October 9, 2013 - 5:04am. Hats off to Brad Price, winner of the Student category in America's Best Raisin Bread competition at the IBIE in Las Vegas this week.  We've been friends of his ...
I know that guy!Submitted by PMcCool on October 9, 2013 - 5:04am. Hats off to Brad Price, winner of the Student category in America's Best Raisin Bread competition at the IBIE in Las Vegas this week.  We've been friends of his family for 15 years or so. Brad is a student at K State in Manhattan, KS.  It's great to see a young person pursuing his passion.Paul
about 5 hours ago
Whole Wheat Flour?Submitted by keriann on October 9, 2013 - 2:16am. I just bought this "Whole Wheat Flour" from a bakery supply store near my home in NW China. Can anyone tell me how to put it to the best use?Here's a picture of the...
Whole Wheat Flour?Submitted by keriann on October 9, 2013 - 2:16am. I just bought this "Whole Wheat Flour" from a bakery supply store near my home in NW China. Can anyone tell me how to put it to the best use?Here's a picture of the back of the package:Here's a close-up of the flour:When I mix it with water it becomes very dark brown and extremely sticky. If I don't add AP flour it is quite unmanageable!Can anyone give me a suggestion of the easiest ways to use this flour? Thanks!Keriann
about 8 hours ago
If you’ve been anywhere on the internet these days, you have probably seen pumpkin spice EVERYTHING wherever you’ve gone. Pumpkin spice lattes have taken over Starbucks ads, pumpkin spice muffins are nearly rolling off the sc...
If you’ve been anywhere on the internet these days, you have probably seen pumpkin spice EVERYTHING wherever you’ve gone. Pumpkin spice lattes have taken over Starbucks ads, pumpkin spice muffins are nearly rolling off the screen, and this meme is everywhere: The artwork by peasandcrayons is based on artist and blogger Allie Brosch’s hilarious writing over on Hyperbole and a Half. Her over-the-top childhood self portrait has become the icon for how we can take something we like and turn it into a raging tidal wave from which there is no escape. Or IS there? For years we’ve enjoyed a pumpkin cream cheese roll as part of our fall/Thanksgiving holidays. It’s something I’ve looked forward to year after year, sneaking into the fridge to shave off just enough for a taste, but not enough so anyone would notice a big piece missing. But with pumpkin pie, pumpkin cookies, pumpkin bread, and pumpkin doughnuts on the menu, too, I’m ready for a break in the pumpkin action. Enter our old and dear friend, banana. Texturally pumpkin and banana share a lot of traits, and both have a richness that can stand up to a cream cheese filling. How about if we swap in banana in our favorite holiday roll? No hyperbole here, this roll is AMAZING! It’s like fresh banana bread with a schmear of cream cheese, only gilded in gold and served by cherubs. The caramel-rum sauce adds an extra touch that really earns this roll a place at the holiday buffet. Let’s make Banana Cream Cheese Roll. Preheat the oven to 375°F. In a small bowl combine: 1 cup (4 1/4 ounces) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda Whisk until well combined and lump free, and set aside. Mash 1 medium banana, about 1/2 cup. In a stand mixer, whip 2 large egg whites (reserve the yolks) until foamy. Continue to beat as you slowly add in 1/4 cup sugar. Whip until you have stiff, but not dry peaks. Remove from the mixer and set aside with your other ingredients. Rinse your mixing bowl and put the two reserved egg yolks into the bowl. Beat on medium-high speed until the eggs lighten and thicken. Keep beating while you gradually add 1/2 cup sugar. The egg yolks should fall from your beater or spatula in a thick ribbon, almost like pancake batter. If it runs off like thin liquid, you’ll want to beat it a bit longer. Once the yolks are thick, gently stir in the mashed banana, then the flour mixture. Finally, fold in the whipped egg whites. Try to make large, gentle folds to keep the batter as light as possible. Prepare a parchment-lined jelly roll pan. These pans are smaller than cookie sheets, measuring around 9″ or 10″ by 14″ or 15″. Trim your parchment to fit, and spritz with cooking spray. Pour in the batter and spread to the edges and corners. Bake the cake for 8 to 12 minutes. The edges will begin to pull away from the sides of the pan and the center will spring back when lightly pressed. Remove the cake from the pan by lifting the parchment paper. Place the cake on the counter and trim off the edges to make rolling easier. Turn the cake over onto a clean towel well sprinkled with confectioners’ sugar. Peel off the parchment paper. Roll the cake up as though the towel were the filling. Cool the cake, rolled up, for 20 to 30 minutes. Be sure to cool on a rack so that the bottom of the cake doesn’t become soggy and stick to the counter. While the cake is cooling, prepare the filling. To make the rum syrup, place 1 cup of brown sugar with 1/2 cup of  water in a medium-sized sauté pan over medium heat. Cook until the sugar dissolves and the liquid turns syrupy, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and stir in 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 to 4 tablespoons of rum. Allow to cool to room temperature. You can certainly leave the rum out, but it brings amazing flavor to the party. If you prefer rum extract, use about 1/4 t
about 8 hours ago
Pumpkin Seed Atta Sourdough Batard, Trial 1 & 2Submitted by bakingbadly on October 8, 2013 - 10:33pm. Three weeks ago I attempted Marcus's Polenta Pepita Sourdough formula, with a few adaptations. I substituted the pumpkin seeds wit...
Pumpkin Seed Atta Sourdough Batard, Trial 1 & 2Submitted by bakingbadly on October 8, 2013 - 10:33pm. Three weeks ago I attempted Marcus's Polenta Pepita Sourdough formula, with a few adaptations. I substituted the pumpkin seeds with sunflower seeds, replaced the whole wheat flour with medium rye flour, and adjusted a few procedures to suit tropical conditions. Pumpkin Seed Atta Sourdough Batard, Trial 1The following week I wanted to try a more authentic version of Marcus's formula. Pumpkin seeds were finally in stock (and very costly), and I found "chakki atta" (stone-ground whole durum wheat flour), generally used for Indian flatbreads. That's as close to whole wheat flour I was going to get.Unfortunately, on bake day I realized I had forgotten to pre-soak the cornmeal (polenta) the night before.  Pumpkin Seed Atta Sourdough Batard (Crumb), Trial 1Keeping my composure, I substituted the cornmeal with atta and increased the water amount of the final dough. The result? A triple whammy: My loaf was under-hydrated, under-developed, and under-proofed. "You need to get back to the fundamentals," said Zita to himself, in a brash tone. Pumpkin Seed Atta Sourdough Batard, Trial 2Last Sunday I re-attempted my last formula. I omitted the cornmeal (replacing it with an atta soaker), increased the hydration of the dough, added more stretch and folds, and extended the proofing period of my dough. My efforts were rewarded with the above. Pumpkin Seed Atta Sourdough Batard, Trial 2Flavour profile: Due to negligence I over-cooked the crust, thus a bit bitter and smells more "roasted", coffee- and charcoal-like. Not necessarily a bad thing. The flesh was subtly sweeter than my last loaf, faintly sour (almost non-existent), and not as dry. Overall, a better, more acceptable loaf but still not good enough.Rainfall at a rice field in CambodiaWhat's the purpose of baking bread if you can't share it? I don't know about you, but it's disconcerting to bake something that stems from your heart and bar others from experiencing it.Good bread is hard to come by here in Cambodia, and I'm keen on propagating my love and joy in the form of sourdough. Perhaps I'll have that opportunity soon.Best wishes and jolly baking, fellow bakers,Zita
about 11 hours ago
Experiment: Starter + salt / Starter + lemongrassSubmitted by leekohlbradley on October 8, 2013 - 8:24pm. I live in Taiwan where it's hot and humid. I love the weather (probably one of the very few!) and so does my sourdough starter...
Experiment: Starter + salt / Starter + lemongrassSubmitted by leekohlbradley on October 8, 2013 - 8:24pm. I live in Taiwan where it's hot and humid. I love the weather (probably one of the very few!) and so does my sourdough starter. A little too much, in fact. It doubles in 2 hours! It makes great bread but honestly it's too much to handle. I had it in the fridge before but was facing the opposite problem. It was very sluggish and unpredictable. So I've decided to try two experiments: Feed a starter with a low percentage of salt to limit fermentation and yeast / bacterial activity. And feed another with added lemongrass, which grows here and I'm led to believe has antibacterial properties. Given how long it lasts in my fridge I'd say it's true haha. Anyway I will try to post results here and if anyone has advice/thoughts then I'd be delighted to hear! Lee
about 13 hours ago
In mid-September we took a trip to New York City with our good friends the Grizzlies. Grizzly is not their real name. This is just my pet nickname for them as they share many of the same personality traits as grizzly bears. As you may kn...
In mid-September we took a trip to New York City with our good friends the Grizzlies. Grizzly is not their real name. This is just my pet nickname for them as they share many of the same personality traits as grizzly bears. As you may know, grizzly bears hibernate for the winter.  In preparation for hibernation, […]
about 15 hours ago
Interior crumb of my poolish bouleSubmitted by Casey_Powers on October 8, 2013 - 4:41pm. This expanded but it has nice crumb.  What do you think? I was so surprised based on the boule expansion.
Interior crumb of my poolish bouleSubmitted by Casey_Powers on October 8, 2013 - 4:41pm. This expanded but it has nice crumb.  What do you think? I was so surprised based on the boule expansion.
about 17 hours ago