Burgers

add news feed

tweet a story

From A Hamburger Today Of course we love our mom & pops, and our favorite burger joints around the country are pretty much all independently owned, but there are certain times in life—overnight layo...
From A Hamburger Today Of course we love our mom & pops, and our favorite burger joints around the country are pretty much all independently owned, but there are certain times in life—overnight layovers, hungover Sunday mornings, all-day shopping trips at the outlets—that the only options around are the chains. Chain Reaction is here to help you decide when to go for the burger, and when you're better off sticking with the chicken fingers. [Photographs: Todd Brock] Dave & Buster's2215 D&B Drive, Marietta, GA 30067 (Map); 770-951-5554daveandbusters.com, 60+ locations in 27 statesThe Schtick: Super-sports bar/adult playground with massive arcade The Burger: Half-pound burgers are topped nicely, but have a weird soft texture that's seriously off-putting Want Fries With That? Fries are crisp, well-seasoned, and served in huge quantitiesSetting: D&B's feels upscale...unless you sit near the Million Dollar MidwayPrice:Black & Bleu Burger, $9.99; South Philly Burger, $11.99 Dave & Buster's used to be a big night out for me. This is when I was 23 and virtual reality was the hot new thing. My local Dave & Buster's was one of the few places that had the big setup, where you'd wait in line to strap on a helmet/visor that showed you yourself as a blocky stack of pixels strolling (quite smoothly onscreen, but flailing wildly in real life) through a 3-D landscape of different-colored blocky stacks of pixels, trying to shoot the blocky stack of pixels who accompanied you. Now Dave & Buster's feels like Chuck E. Cheese's for adults to me (or Vegas Lite). Total sensory overload, with every bell and whistle and flashing neon light designed to help vacuum money right out of your wallet while selling you on how much extreme fun you're having. A something-for-everyone vibe where they loop videos of well-dressed people high-fiving each other and getting impossibly giddy playing the grown-up equivalent of whack-a-mole, all designed to remind you to load more cash onto your Power Card for a long night on the Million Dollar Midway. It's a sports bar on steroids with an arcade on steroids. Yes, they serve food, but it's not a place you go for serious food. The chow is secondary to the high-tech gaming. Sadly, their burgers back that last notion up. It's a fairly large menu (back to that something-for-everyone philosophy) with steaks, ribs, pastas, tons of appetizers and snacks, sandwiches, and burgers. For beefeaters, there are four to choose from: a half-pound cheeseburger, a double cheeseburger, and the two I sampled this night. First up was the Black & Bleu ($9.99). Billed as "a half-pound of Angus beef seared with Cajun seasoning," it's also topped with melted blue cheese plus "frazzled and caramelized onions." Add bacon for 99¢, and that becomes the most prominent thing on the burger, as evidenced by that photo. It's the most prominent thing taste-wise, too. In a burger reviewing first for me, the initial impression that registered with my first bite was...soft. It was bizarre. The fluffy, almost-airy beef seemed to offer less resistance than the brioche bun it was nestled in, like vaguely-meat-flavored cotton candy. And while that's a genius idea for the state fair, a burger where the only real texture came from bacon (which was actually quite crisp and tasty) and frazzled onion (not usually my thing, but I'll take what I can get here) was just plain weird. But maybe, I hoped, it was just that one burger. The South Philly Burger ($11.99) showed more promise, at least in its plating, being served up in an impressive cast iron skillet. Wait. Make that a fake plastic prop skillet. Eww. My heart sank. Topped with thin-sliced steak "imported directly from Philly," it's also got peppers, onions, mushrooms, and melted white American cheese. The toppings here work, for the most part. Cheesy, peppery, decent crunch from the veggies—a little bite of Broad Street
1 day ago
From Chicago The Ghost Burger [Courtesy of Kuma's Corner/Facebook] So I realize I am terribly late in covering this story, but since it first came to my attention last week, it's only gotten more c...
From Chicago The Ghost Burger [Courtesy of Kuma's Corner/Facebook] So I realize I am terribly late in covering this story, but since it first came to my attention last week, it's only gotten more confusing. Hopefully this clears things up a bit. What Happened Kuma's Corner is serving a burger this month called The Ghost, which is topped with slow braised goat shoulder, aged white cheddar, ghost chile aioli, red wine reduction, and, oh yeah, a communion wafer. That latter ingredient offended some, and the resulting media storm has been covered by just about every single publication you can think of, from the Chicago Tribune and the Huffington Post to SPIN and the U.K.'s Daily Mail. The Heavy Metal Background Kuma's Corner offers a new burger special every single month. Like most of the burgers on its regular menu, the dish is named for heavy metal band. That was definitely the case last year when I ordered a Christ Inversion, named for the band of the same name. This month's special was named after Ghost B.C., a Swedish heavy metal band that is currently touring in the U.S. What's Happened Since Despite calls to remove the burger, Kuma's Corner held firm, posting an update on its blog that includes the following statement: "...we, in no way, created this as a commentary on religion or as an attack on anyones personal beliefs. In the past we have done a number of burgers dealing with this same exact topic to very little fanfare. Never in the spirit of offending anyone, and always in mindset of praising a band for the work that they do." Kuma's also announced that it would make a $1,500 donation to the Catholic Charities of the Chicago Archdiocese, writing that "we understand that they share our mentality of serving anyone in need from any walk of life." But that's not where this ends. The same charity released a statement claiming that it "has not received nor will we accept a donation from Kuma's Corner." But according to CBS Chicago, Kuma's owner, Michael Cain, claims that the "money's already been taken out of his bank account." So, there you go. Some people are really pissed, others are not. Perhaps getting lost in all of this is that a heavy metal band from Sweden is getting way more press than it ever imagined possible.
2 days ago
Does a concept where last week’s special was The Osso Bucco Burger (Osso Bucco patty, braised veal, braised ketchup, gremolata mayo, fried shallots and parsley) have a future as a chain? Rick Tasman, recently named CEO of Atlanta’s Flip ...
Does a concept where last week’s special was The Osso Bucco Burger (Osso Bucco patty, braised veal, braised ketchup, gremolata mayo, fried shallots and parsley) have a future as a chain? Rick Tasman, recently named CEO of Atlanta’s Flip Burger Boutique, is sure it does and he’s working to make that future bright. Flip’s Osso Bucco Burger Flip was opened in 2008 by Richard Blais, one of two “cheftestants” in Season 4 of Bravo’s “Top Chef” who opened burger joints (The other was Skip Mendelsohn, who opened D.C.’s Good Stuff Eatery. Additionally, Season 4 winner Stephanie Izard’s Little Goat Diner in Chicago has a prominent burger menu). A second Atlanta location has since opened, plus a unit in Birmingham, Ala. A third Atlanta location opens soon. Tasman says he joined up because he sees expansion opportunities for the upscale concept. “We aim to grow,” Tasman told BurgerBusiness.com. “I’ve been enamored with Flip for a long time. It’s a differentiated concept that holds a distinctive niche in the burger segment. It’s a crowded segment, certainly, but we occupy a different place in that we’re full-service with innovative, chef-created burgers, a full-service bar and a loyal following.” Flip CEO Rick Tasman Tasman has more than 35 years of restaurant experience, including a 14-year stint with P.F. Chang’s (lastly as its chief operating officer). Flip will look first at major markets, but Tasman says that there are several cities within 400 miles of Atlanta—including Charleston, S.C.; Charlotte, N.C.; Indianapolis; Louisville; Nashville and Raleigh N.C.—he is looking at. “There are some great markets out there where Flip would do very well in,” he says. “I don’t think well be a 200 unit concept but certainly there’s a possibility we could get to 100.” Franchising is not in the picture, Tasman says. Flip Burger Boutique is difficult enough to execute that it’s not wise to turn it over to others. Chef-founder Richard Blais intends to remain Flip’s culinary director. Despite the skills needed to execute Flip, Tasman doesn’t aim to change the concept. Blais will continue to be the restaurant’s face and culinary guide. Osso Bucco burgers are a bit epicurean, but that kind of creativity is what guests come for and it won’t change. “They look forward to the new items and the innovations,” Tasman says. For us to move away from our core guests would be a mistake.” Flip has a toney image but has worked to avoid being perceived as high-priced. The menu includes Red Haute Hot Dogs at $5.50; the Classic burger, fried chicken and turkey sandwich are all priced at $7.50. Burgers top out at $14 for the Earth+Turf. Tasman wants to increase Flip’s average check but not by raising prices. He wants to add bar appetizers and snacks that can boost customer traffic to the full-service bar. And the fall menu (being released later this month) will include Flip’s first entrée salad. Tasman expects more will follow. The Flip concept needs no significant changes, Tasman says. “We probably need to button up operations a bit and make sure we can replicate it and execute it in other markets,” he says. “So I want to make sure our culinary ops are in good shape and that we have the training materials needed so we can teach the concept. There are great opportunities out there.”
2 days ago
From A Hamburger Today VIEW SLIDESHOW: 7 Great Lamb Burgers Lamb Burger from The Breslin in NYC [Photograph: Robyn Lee] Beef is the p...
From A Hamburger Today VIEW SLIDESHOW: 7 Great Lamb Burgers Lamb Burger from The Breslin in NYC [Photograph: Robyn Lee] Beef is the protein of choice on the majority of burgers reviewed on AHT, but that doesn't mean we don't love a good lamburger now and then. The gamey meat can stand up to robust toppings, like spicy mayo, onion relish, and aggressive cheeses, making it a great base for experimentation. Check out seven of our favorite lamb burgers by clicking through the slideshow, or jump directly to the burgers, below » Lamb Burger from Badmaash in Los Angeles, [Photograph: Damon Gambuto] The Breslin, NYC » Lola, Seattle » The Fireside Cellars at Willows Lodge, Woodinville WA » Badmaash, Los Angeles » Balaboosta, NYC » Harlem Tavern, NYC » The Greenhouse Tavern, Cleveland » Related 12 Burgers with Unusual Toppings That Really Work 10 Great Cheesy Burgers That Aren't Just Cheeseburgers Mexico: Five Burgers Worth Checking Out In Tijuana About the author: Erin Jackson is a food writer and photographer who is obsessed with discovering the best eats in San Diego. You can find all of her discoveries on her San Diego food blog EJeats.com. On Twitter, she's @ErinJax Love hamburgers? Then you'll Like AHT on Facebook! And go follow us on Twitter while you're at it!
3 days ago
Categories: Hamburgers, Hot off the Grill, SandwichesTags: Asia Burger, Bravo Burger Taipei, China BurgerAccording to this list, Bravo Burger  in Taipei City is one of the 50 best hamburger joints  in the world.  Asia burger reporter Gui...
Categories: Hamburgers, Hot off the Grill, SandwichesTags: Asia Burger, Bravo Burger Taipei, China BurgerAccording to this list, Bravo Burger  in Taipei City is one of the 50 best hamburger joints  in the world.  Asia burger reporter Guillaume Cadilhac, who doubles as Brand Ambassador for Remy Martin, stopped in and had the guacamole, mushroom cheeseburger and pronounced it “c’est fantastique!”(Read more...)The post Taipei, Taiwan – One of the 50 Best Burgers in the World appeared first on Burgers, Dogs, & Pizza, Oh My!.
4 days ago
From A Hamburger Today [Photographs: Above, TGI Friday's, all others, Erin Jackson] After nearly two years of development, TGI Friday's revealed their new line-up of double-patty Stacked Burgers o...
From A Hamburger Today [Photographs: Above, TGI Friday's, all others, Erin Jackson] After nearly two years of development, TGI Friday's revealed their new line-up of double-patty Stacked Burgers on Tuesday. They're made with two fresh, 3.6-ounce, 75/25 grilled USDA Choice beef patties with toppings on top, below, and in between. About 80 percent of locations will be serving the burgers on fresh-baked, brioche-style buns delivered by local bakery partners, while the remaining 20 percent of locations will have par-baked buns, according to an in-depth interview with Dan Dillon, TGI Friday's senior director of menu development, about the new burgers on burgerbusiness.com. Here's a run-down of the three burgers with their menu descriptions: All-American Stacked Burger: Melted sharp cheddar cheese, onion bacon jam and Asiago and Parmesan spread between two fresh burgers with Thousand Island dressing and peppered bacon, 1460 calories Philly Stacked Burger: Braised shredded beef, mozzarella, Asiago and Parmesan spread, roasted cremini mushrooms, spicy giardiniera and green onion between two fresh burgers with Swiss cheese, lettuce, tomato, horseradish spread, onion bacon jam and peppered bacon, 1470 calories Bleu Cheese Stacked Burger: Melted bleu cheese, roasted cremini mushrooms, balsamic and green onions between two fresh burgers crusted with bleu cheese, and roasted garlic rosemary aioli and peppered bacon, 1490 calories When I dropped by my local Friday's to test-drive the new burgers, it was apparent that there's still a learning curve going on in the kitchen. Two out of the three burgers were delivered with multiple toppings missing, and one was put together with one large beef patty instead of two smaller ones. The one burger the kitchen got right on my first visit was the All-American Stacked Burger ($11.79). From the beef to the bacon to the cheese, plus three different condiment spreads (Asiago-Parmesan, onion bacon jam, and Thousand Island) there is a lot going on with this burger—too much, to be specific. With so many toppings, it's inevitable that most of them will mush together or just get totally lost in the fray, which is exactly what happened. I could only really taste the bacon onion jam, the bacon, and the bun. When I picked off a piece of beef to taste solo, it was greasy, a bit rubbery, and tasted like a mass-produced patty that was cooked in advance and had been hanging around in a warming tray. Taken as a whole, the burger might have looked like an upgrade, but in terms of flavor, it tasted like an over-dressed fast food burger on an eggy brioche bun. Things got worse with the Philly Stacked Burger ($11.79), which has the misfortune of being stacked up with a dozen different toppings. Between the shredded beef, the horseradish spread, and the bacon and onion jam, the beef was rendered completely invisible. The only purpose it served was to increase the height of the burger. Flavor-wise, it didn't taste like a burger at all, but like an extra salty and oily roast beef sandwich. I managed only a few bites. If you like blue cheese and absolutely have to order a burger at TGI Friday's, go with the Bleu Cheese Stacked Burger ($11.79). The beef wasn't any better, but the blue cheese had a nice tangy bite to it, and it paired well with the roasted garlic rosemary aioli and bacon. Skip the roasted cremini mushrooms, though. They're covered in a slick of oil and make no improvement on the flavor of the burger. My overall impression of TGI Friday's new burgers wasn't good. Piling on all of those toppings only serves one purpose: disguising the beef. If a great burger is what the chain was going for with this launch, they still haven't achieved it. Fresh, not frozen, beef was a step in the right direction, but not if the patties are pre-formed, mass-produced, and cooked without any care. So, unless what you're looking for in a bur
6 days ago
Pal’s Sudden Service restaurants don’t look like those of any other burger chain in America, so it’s only right that it has an advertising strategy all its own. Pal’s latest campaign doesn’t spotlight Millennials, teens or heavy us...
Pal’s Sudden Service restaurants don’t look like those of any other burger chain in America, so it’s only right that it has an advertising strategy all its own. Pal’s latest campaign doesn’t spotlight Millennials, teens or heavy users but people who can’t visit its restaurants. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3eJO9jI8U8o “Come Home to Pal’s” is the theme of the marketing campaign that broke this week. The 25-location chain, based in Kingsport, Tenn., knows that some of its loyal fans have moved away for one reason or another. The chain says approximately 20% of its 48,000 Facebook followers live outside its northeastern Tennessee/southwestern Virginia territory. So the chain is inviting those who love its Big Pal burgers, hot dogs and Frenchie Fries to submit a 150-words-or-less essay via http://palsweb.com/comehome nominating someone who should come on home to Pal’s. Nothing else looks like a Pal’s restaurant. “We consistently receive comments through our social media sites from folks who used to live in our region, wishing that they were back home so that they could enjoy the Pal’s menu,” said Pal’s President-CEO Thom Crosby. “Just in time for the holidays, we are going to delight one lucky person with that opportunity. We will select one person, who can bring a guest, to receive round-trip airfare home for a visit with old friends and a catered meal to feed up to 25 people from Pal’s.” The multimedia campaign, created by longtime Pal’s agency Creative Energy in Johnson City, Tenn., uses broadcast, outdoor and social media to connect with current and past Pal’s customers. A TV spot (above) features a woman who makes a friend homesick by enjoying a Pal’s hot dog during their online Skype conversation. The contest runs through Nov. 15, 2013.
6 days ago
From A Hamburger Today [Photograph: Rockit Burger Bar on Facebook] We've seen mac and cheese in a burger patty, mac and cheese on top of a burger patty, fried mac and cheese on top of a burger patt...
From A Hamburger Today [Photograph: Rockit Burger Bar on Facebook] We've seen mac and cheese in a burger patty, mac and cheese on top of a burger patty, fried mac and cheese on top of a burger patty, and cheeseburger mac and cheese. Is that enough mac and cheese + burger action for the world? No, says Rockit Burger Bar in Chicago, whose limited time Mac Attack burger fills the void of burgers with fried mac and cheese for buns. The burger also comes with scallions, sriracha ketchup, lettuce, and tomato. It's only available available this Sunday, October 6, but seeing as Rockit Burger Bar introduced this burger back in September, I'd be surprised if they didn't bring it back in the future. Rockit Burger Bar also serves a mac and cheese-topped burger on their regular menu [PDF]. If anyone tries the burger, let us know how it is. [via HuffPo] About the author: Robyn Lee is the editor of A Hamburger Today and takes many of the photos for Serious Eats. She'll also doodle cute stuff when necessary. Read more from Robyn at her personal food blog, The Girl Who Ate Everything.
6 days ago
From A Hamburger Today Burgers from The Wright Bar and The Longhorn Cafe [Photographs: Left: Erin Jackson, Right: Damon Gambuto] This week, we're curious if you like your toppings on top of, or bel...
From A Hamburger Today Burgers from The Wright Bar and The Longhorn Cafe [Photographs: Left: Erin Jackson, Right: Damon Gambuto] This week, we're curious if you like your toppings on top of, or below, your burger patty (and why). Do you find that putting the toppings on the bottom helps the bun from getting soggy? Do you like having everything up top so that the veggies stay nice and crisp? Maybe it's a mix of both, or you haven't noticed a difference whether the toppings are above or below the beef. Either way, we want to know. Poll: Do You Like Your Burger Toppings Above or Below the Beef? Results from Last Week's Poll Daily Double from McDonald's [Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt] Last week, we asked if you'd opt for a healthy side over fries at McDonald's. Here's what a few of you had to say: No. I only eat at McDonald's 2-3 times a year so I will order fries and not think for a second to have a salad or fruit. —finsbigfan A decent side salad, sure. A feeble mix of browning iceberg, carrot shreds and rock-hard pink tomatoes, no way. —MargieNash No chance. I already know what I'm doing to myself when I go to McDonald's. That is not my "make myself healthy" time...that is my "destroy the dollar menu" and eat some fries time. —TehBuLL Poll Results Yeah, you want fries with that. Nearly half (47 percent) of AHT'ers said fries are a must at McDonald's, while only 25 percent said they would opt for a healthier alternative (the least popular answer, after "maybe", with 28 percent of the vote). Note: the poll remains open, so these numbers may shift slightly in the future. About the author: Erin Jackson is a food writer and photographer who is obsessed with discovering the best eats in San Diego. You can find all of her discoveries on her San Diego food blog EJeats.com. On Twitter, she's @ErinJax Love hamburgers? Then you'll Like AHT on Facebook! And go follow us on Twitter while you're at it!
7 days ago
From A Hamburger Today Andrea's Ramen Burger Sliders [Photograph: Andrea's] The ramen burger has made it all the way to Vegas. The latest copycat is Andrea's, an upscale Asian fusion restaurant at ...
From A Hamburger Today Andrea's Ramen Burger Sliders [Photograph: Andrea's] The ramen burger has made it all the way to Vegas. The latest copycat is Andrea's, an upscale Asian fusion restaurant at Wynn Las Vegas. There, you can get ramen burger sliders made with pan-fried ramen noodle "buns." Toppings include oven-dried tomato, spicy relish, Bibb lettuce, and red onion. House-made pickles come on the side. The ramen burger sliders are available every Tuesday evening, starting today (October 8th) with a beer cocktail pairing for $23. The Gunner (Jameson Irish Whiskey, Disaronno Amaretto, lemon sweet 'n sour, pasteurized egg white, and Innis & Gunn Irish Whiskey Cask beer) sounds pretty good...but I can't help but notice that those "buns" look verrrry tightly packed. [via: Eater Las Vegas] Related Get Ramen Burgers This Weekend at Smorgasburg in Brooklyn How to Make a Ramen Burger Ramen Burgers at RakiRaki in San Diego About the author: Erin Jackson is a food writer and photographer who is obsessed with discovering the best eats in San Diego. You can find all of her discoveries on her San Diego food blog EJeats.com. On Twitter, she's @ErinJax Love hamburgers? Then you'll Like AHT on Facebook! And go follow us on Twitter while you're at it!
7 days ago