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The director of the U.S. National Security Agency wants you to trust his people.The NSA needs to regain the trust of U.S. residents and the country's telecom and Internet companies, General Keith Alexander said Wednesday, following recen...
The director of the U.S. National Security Agency wants you to trust his people.The NSA needs to regain the trust of U.S. residents and the country's telecom and Internet companies, General Keith Alexander said Wednesday, following recent media leaks about massive data collection and surveillance operations.In addition to its surveillance role, the NSA also has responsibility to protect the U.S. against cyberattacks, and the agency needs cooperation and trust to accomplish its cybersecurity mission, Alexander said in a speech at the Telecommunications Industry Association's annual conference.The media reports, based on leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, has hurt a foundation of trust between the NSA and U.S. businesses, the NSA's director said. Alexander defended the data collection and surveillance programs as necessary to protect the U.S. against terrorism.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here
about 1 hour ago
Being a photographer can sometimes be a lonely prospect. Even photographers that often work with people as subjects or on crowded streets will have to put in countless hours alone, editing their work. This fact only makes it even more im...
Being a photographer can sometimes be a lonely prospect. Even photographers that often work with people as subjects or on crowded streets will have to put in countless hours alone, editing their work. This fact only makes it even more important for photographers to actively reach out and form communities, if not for the sake of their work then at least for the sake of their social lives and sanity. A few years after moving to Atlanta I was invited to attend a local photographer meet-up. It would later turn into a monthly meet-up, at least for a little while, and it was easily responsible for one of my biggest periods of growth as a photographer. This wasn’t necessarily because the meet-up was particularly informative or instructive, but because the environment was refreshing and it was nice to engage with other photographers from different backgrounds in a casual, non-competitive arena. It was akin to being back in a really good class at college, but now you actually have some semblance of what the heck you’re doing. I met numerous people and got to learn about and understand their various fields of photography and how they came to them. A lot of these are people I would now call good friends, and several of them have helped me get a number of well-paying jobs since then. The group also provided several opportunities that can be difficult to find outside of the classroom. We would have monthly critiques of each other’s work, we’d discuss new software or our old favorite go-to’s, and we even had a couple of guest speakers. Now these are all things that can of course be emulated through news sites and online groups but there’s something missing in that experience. This provided a much more trusted first-hand account. There was a face to associate with that lens recommendation, somebody was actually standing in front of you explaining the new technique you’d read about several times but never actually tried. It all just felt much more tangible and, as a result, more satisfying. This satisfaction wasn’t just on an informational level either. There was an energy given off by the group at every single outing. It’s easy to get worn out during those long hours editing your photos or even if you’re just in a string of less-than-desirable jobs, but every time I left the group, regardless of my state of mind beforehand, I felt good. I felt good, not only about my photography, but about myself in general. I felt energized, and usually walked away with some seedling of an idea for a new personal project I wanted to try after talking to somebody else about their work. As I mentioned above, our group sadly did not last more than a few months, but the personal connections I made, the information I gleaned, and the reinvigorated excitement it provided made it a great experience nonetheless. As a result, I strongly suggest you seek out your own local photography community. If one doesn’t exist yet, make one. This group didn’t exist before the few group leaders randomly decided to put it together one day. The same could be said of you and your future photography community. If you should decide to take on this endeavor yourself, here are a few things I learned from the organizers responsible for our group that will hopefully help you make your group a success. 1. Know What You Want Know what you want the group to be before you start it. Don’t let the group vote on it. Democracy is a great thing but often, in situations like this, it just means a muddled message of what you’re trying to achieve. Instead of pleasing everybody you usually just end up with chaos. Decide what you want the group’s purpose to be and establish that beforehand. If you want it to be for critiques, then make sure to tell people to have work ready to present. If you just want it to be a casual dinner group that shares stories, make sure people know that. That said, also allow the gro
about 2 hours ago
After months of teasing and speculation, Samsung has finally announced its curved smartphone. The Galaxy Round is a 5.7-inch device with a curved 1080p, AMOLED display. Like its Galaxy S4 and Not 3 predecessors, the Galaxy Round features...
After months of teasing and speculation, Samsung has finally announced its curved smartphone. The Galaxy Round is a 5.7-inch device with a curved 1080p, AMOLED display. Like its Galaxy S4 and Not 3 predecessors, the Galaxy Round features a 13-megapixel camera. The Galaxy Round's unique shape allows for a different user experience. According to Samsung, the phone is more comfortable to hold than flat phones and users can take advantage of some features unique to the curved device. Click through for more details at connect.dpreview.com
about 2 hours ago
SLR Magic has announced the launch of a new HyperPrime Cine 12mm T1.6 lens.
SLR Magic has announced the launch of a new HyperPrime Cine 12mm T1.6 lens.
about 2 hours ago
Just answer a simple question correctly and you could win one of ten day passes to PhotoLive 2013!
Just answer a simple question correctly and you could win one of ten day passes to PhotoLive 2013!
about 3 hours ago
Nikita Morris takes a look at Case Logic's Journal Folio for Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1.
Nikita Morris takes a look at Case Logic's Journal Folio for Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1.
about 3 hours ago
If you’ve been wishing and hoping for Lytro-like ‘take now, focus later” technology to appear in smartphones, it looks like a couple of different companies are planning on making that wish come true. Not only did Toshib...
If you’ve been wishing and hoping for Lytro-like ‘take now, focus later” technology to appear in smartphones, it looks like a couple of different companies are planning on making that wish come true. Not only did Toshiba announce its own refocusing module just a couple of weeks ago, it seems OPPO will be putting similar tech into their future camera phones too. The news comes straight from DigitalOptics, whose MemsCam we introduced you to back in March. The company’s 8MP and 13MP modules promise Lytro-like refocusing and lightning fast autofocus thanks to the built-in MEMS (microelectromechanical silicone system) tech the camera is named for. And it’ll do it all while consuming a fraction of the energy of traditional camera sensors. As you might imagine, several companies expressed interest in putting the MemsCam into their phones, and it seems that OPPO won out in a big way. According to the DigitalOptics president John Thode, OPPO is an “exclusive launch partner” for the MemsCam, and will be “the first smartphone OEM to incorporate MemsCam products in volume.” He continued on to say that he was impressed with the recently released N1 from OPPO, and that “integrating MemsCam modules into OPPO’s best-in-class smartphones will bring an exciting computational imaging user experience that further delivers on OPPO’s brand promise.” No word on when the modules will make their actual debut in an OPPO phone, but expect the next major smartphone release from the Chinese company to offer much more than a swiveling camera. (via Engadget)
about 3 hours ago
Use coupon code PX40CCSALE at AdoramaPix to get a custom cover, lay flat 10x10 photo book for 40% off. Photo books make great gifts - get yours early to avoid holiday delays.
Use coupon code PX40CCSALE at AdoramaPix to get a custom cover, lay flat 10x10 photo book for 40% off. Photo books make great gifts - get yours early to avoid holiday delays.
about 3 hours ago
Earlier this year, we said that we'd like to do a better job of bringing our readers along the journey with us as we review the latest digital cameras to hit the IR Lab. That includes sharing image comparisons and print quality analy...
Earlier this year, we said that we'd like to do a better job of bringing our readers along the journey with us as we review the latest digital cameras to hit the IR Lab. That includes sharing image comparisons and print quality analysis earlier in the review process. After all, we know you're hungry for information on these hot new models. In that spirit, we've just published our initial Olympus E-M1 image comparisons and print quality analysis of the company's yet-to-be-released flagship mirrorless camera. Click here to see a... (read more)
about 3 hours ago
Read our full review of the Olympus OM-D E-M1, a premium weather sealed mirrorless camera with DSLR styling.
Read our full review of the Olympus OM-D E-M1, a premium weather sealed mirrorless camera with DSLR styling.
about 4 hours ago