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Job hunting can be a very stressful thing for many people. If you’re between jobs, the thought of not having an income for a while can be overwhelming. Not to mention the fact that you need to really impress when it comes to the applicat...
Job hunting can be a very stressful thing for many people. If you’re between jobs, the thought of not having an income for a while can be overwhelming. Not to mention the fact that you need to really impress when it comes to the application process. Like any other type of stress, job hunt stress can become paralyzing and have a hugely negative affect on your ability to source and secure a job. However, there are some simple strategies that you can put in place to minimize your stress and help you land your dream job in a fun and exciting way. Strategies To Minimize Job Hunt Stress Below are four actions that you can take to help you minimize stress while job hunting. 1. Listen To Music When you’re browsing job boards online, tidying up your resume or getting dressed for your upcoming job interview, play some of your favourite tunes and get your groove going. Music has proven to have many scientific benefits that will help you stay relaxed, stay positive and stay focused on the task at hand. Music also creates a more fun environment to help you reduce your job hunt stress. 2. Go Somewhere Different There’s no need to lock yourself away silently staring at the computer screen at home. You’re currently not working, so why not enjoy it as much as you can? Keep things exciting and interesting and make the most of your current time off of work. Go out, find new places and explore the world while you’re job hunting. Try going to libraries, cafes, parks, beaches and take your laptop with you. You might just find that when you take yourself out of your normal environment and into something new that you think more clearly, have more positive thoughts and can actually job hunt more effectively and efficiently. This is a sure-fire way of reducing stress while job hunting. 3. Join A Class In Your Area Of Specialty This is a great one. Not only will you be keeping up to date with the latest skills and expertise in your industry, you’ll also have the opportunity of meeting other people with similar interests and who will also have contacts or networks that you could tap into to support your job hunt. Joining a class will help you stay motivated, energised and focused on what it is that you do best. It will help you maintain your confidence throughout the job application procedure and will ultimately support you in minimising any job hunting stress. If you’re at college or university and you’re looking for graduate jobs, then you’re already in a great place. Speak with your tutors and lecturers and see where they can support you. 4. Involve Your Friends And Family Job hunting in isolation can be very stressful. However, there’s no reason why it should be done alone. Your family and friends can be your best support while you are job hunting. Not only will your they be there to support you and keep you motivated, they can also act as conduits to more opportunities and a wider network to call upon. The more support from family and friends you have, the more relaxed you will feel while job hunting. All in all, when you’re out of work, enjoy it as much as possible while you can! Finding a job can be a full-time job, but you’re in control of that full-time job. So why not make it a really fun one? Enjoy this article? You’ve got time for another! Check out these related articles: 3 Reasons For Stress In The Workplace Career Advice For The Unemployed: Stress Less Create A Stress Strategy BEFORE You Need It Photo Credit: Shutterstock The post 4 Strategies To Minimize Job Hunt Stress appeared first on CAREEREALISM.
about 4 hours ago
As you know from reading our blog, we’re obsessed with finding the best and latest solutions to the problems in your career. Thanks to a little research and some inspiration from one of the books in our office’s bookshelf, we thought of ...
As you know from reading our blog, we’re obsessed with finding the best and latest solutions to the problems in your career. Thanks to a little research and some inspiration from one of the books in our office’s bookshelf, we thought of another way we can guarantee you and all of our readers the resources and advice that you deserve to give you a happy and productive career. Almost a decade ago, James Surowiecki wrote a book called “The Wisdom of Crowds” to describe his findings in collective intelligence. He discovered that a crowd of people can often be smarter than any individual in it. We’ve applied that same belief to our newest venture. Great Minds Coming Together (We’re Talking About YOU!) CAREEREALISM has created a career advice forum for our users. No matter what question or comment you have about your career, there’s a place for you to ask, praise, talk, or chat about it. We’re even going to have many of our certified career experts involved to make sure your questions are answered. There are three sections to the forum: Ask A Career Expert, Off-Beat, and CAREEREALISM News. Ask A Career Expert Have a question you’d like an answer to that relates to your job, career or job search? Ask here, and you’ll receive some insight from our best approved experts. If you’re not a career expert or answer-seeker but still have something valuable to share from your past experience, then you can chime in as well. You can create your own discussion thread or add to an existing one. Off-Beat If your post doesn’t directly have to do with advice or news about us, then Off-Beat is the section for it. Is there a type of music you listen to at work that makes you feel productive? How about your favorite activity to do with your co-workers? Any comments like those are welcome. This section in particular will go where you want to take it. CAREEREALISM News This section is meant for us to share news we have about our site, and for you to tell us how it could help job seekers. Never Been A Forum User? We Can Help! If you’d like to participate in the CAREEREALISM Forum but you’re a little confused about how you can, read our frequently asked questions and the other details we’ve shared below. How Do I Get To The CAREEREALISM Forum? The forum is right here. The header and footer of our website are also on the forum page, so you can easily get to and from the other parts of CAREEREALISM. How Do I Register For The Forum? You can follow this link to the registration page, where you can either create an account with your email address or sync up with your Facebook Profile. How Do I Write A Comment? Find the button that says REPLY on the right side of your screen and click it. Then fill out your question or comment and click ADD REPLY to share it with everyone. How Do I Start My Own Thread? On each forum section’s page, there is a NEW TOPIC button toward the right side of your screen. Click that, then continue as you would with any other comment or question post. How Do I Set Up My Profile? When you are signed in, click on CONTROL PANEL on the left side of your screen. There, you can change your email address or password, add a profile picture, create a signature to be placed at the bottom of all of your posts, and add to/alter other sections of your profile. How Is The Forum Different From Posting A Comment Directly On The Article? Posting in the forum makes it easier for people with related ideas to see your comment if they didn’t read that specific article. By making it more available, we can have more basic information out there for everyone, so the discussion can develop even further without taking a lot more time. Are There Any Guidelines Or Rules For Using The Forum? We ask that you use common courtesy when posting. Please refrain from obscene language or images. You are welcome to disagree with other commenters, but please be respectful when you do. Make sure your intention is to make the discussion more valuable for everyone, not to make peo
about 4 hours ago
Computers have undoubtedly changed the world. They have made tasks that previously seemed impossible, possible. They allow us to instantly connect with people all over the world. They have hugely enhanced business productivity. The list ...
Computers have undoubtedly changed the world. They have made tasks that previously seemed impossible, possible. They allow us to instantly connect with people all over the world. They have hugely enhanced business productivity. The list goes on. However, computers can also change the way we see the world – and not in a good way! OK, so staring at a screen for too long probably won’t make your eyes turn square like your parents used to say, but it certainly can have a very adverse impact on your vision. Long hours in front of a computer can cause you to suffer from dry eyes, blurry vision, headaches and in some cases even lead to short-sightedness or scarring of the cornea. Let’s say you stare at your computer screen for eight hours on a working day, that’s 40 hours a week, and (let me just get my calculator out) 2080 hours a year! What makes this statistic even more frightening is that most of us then go home and proceed to stare at even more screens – mobile phones, televisions, laptops, tablets. There are habits that can prevent eye damage at work and keep you healthy everywhere though. Here are the most important ones: 1. The 20-20-20 Rule The what? Every 20 minutes, take your eyes off your screen for 20 seconds, and look at something 20 feet away. This rule helps to relax your eye muscles and consequently reduces eye fatigue throughout the day. Of course this is only a guideline – the 19-22-20 rule or the 17-20-25 rule will work just as well! 20-20-20 just has a nicer ring to it, don’t you think? 2. Remember To Blink! When we stare at a screen for a prolonged period of time we tend to forget to blink! In fact, in the minute you’ve spent reading this article so far you have probably only blinked about 4 times, whereas if your eyes weren’t focused on anything in particular you would have blinked approximately 12 times! Blinking frequently is essential as it helps to lubricate the eyes and keep them from feeling dry and irritated. 3. Set Up Your Desk Ergonomically Having a bad desk layout is one of the most common reasons for eyestrain in the workplace, and one of the easiest to fix. Your eyes should be in line with or just below the top of your computer screen, which should be approximately 20-30 inches away from your eyes. It is also important to ensure that your computer screen is unaffected by glare from ceiling lights or windows. 4. Find A Comfortable Level Of Brightness This works two-fold in that the brightness of both your screen and your surroundings are equally as important for maintaining healthy eyes in the office. Your computer screen should not seem any brighter or darker than the lighting in your office. If you’re struggling to read what is on your screen, or similarly if your screen is an obvious light source (as in the photo above) then change the settings! 5. Take Short Breaks This tip is similar to the 20-20-20 rule in that it gives your eye muscles a chance to relax. What I always see in my office is people browsing the web on their lunch hour – but this is the perfect opportunity to get away from your computer and give your eyes a break! It is also important to take short breaks throughout the day – this can be making yourself a cup of tea or even just walking to the printer and back (make sure you actually print something or this can look a bit weird). Enjoy this article? You’ve got time for another! Check out these related articles: 5 Tips For Maintaining Eye Health At Work Say What? Hearing Health And Your Career 6 Eye-Tracking Secrets That Will Get Resumes Read Photo Credit: Shutterstock The post 5 Ways To Stop Eye Damage At Work appeared first on CAREEREALISM.
about 5 hours ago
You’ve worked hard, you’ve kept your nose clean and you’re sure that you can pass even a stringent background check. You’ve even put in the time and effort to make sure that you’ll come out smelling like a rose if a potential employer de...
You’ve worked hard, you’ve kept your nose clean and you’re sure that you can pass even a stringent background check. You’ve even put in the time and effort to make sure that you’ll come out smelling like a rose if a potential employer decides to check your online reputation. You’re sure that you’re in the clear… but have you checked your credit? An employer checking applicants’ credit records and scores isn’t anything new. It is something that has been done for the last couple of decades. According to CBS, about half of all employers will not just check an applicant’s credit but use bad or negligible credit histories against an applicant during the decision process. It’s a terrible place in which to be, especially since getting a good job is precisely what can help someone repair and rebuild their credit standing. So what do you do? How do you make sure that your credit won’t keep you from getting that dream job (or any job at all, given this market)? 1. Obtain A Copy Of Your Report Do not fall for any of the online ads offering you credit monitoring for X amount of dollars each month. Right now your primary concern is getting your hands on your report and your score. Here’s the good news: every single person in the US is entitled to one free copy of their report from each of the main credit reporting agencies (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) every year. The best place to get these reports is through AnnualCreditReport.com. Annual Credit Report is the only credit reporting portal that has been endorsed by the US government. Note: Annual Credit Report is just a portal. Don’t freak out when it sends you to the primary websites for Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion. 2. Correct Any Mistakes According to LexingtonLaw.com, a quarter of US residents have mistakes in their credit report. Even worse, those mistakes are often enough to considerably drag down your credit score and history! Luckily, you are allowed to dispute everything reported in your report. If the reporting agency cannot verify the item’s legitimacy, it will be removed from your record. Go through those reports with a fine toothed comb. Look them over more carefully than you did your senior thesis. Dispute every single mistake you see, no matter how minor it might seem! Every correction helps you out. 3. Get On Track Financially Keeping your finances intact while you’re searching out your dream job doesn’t need to be difficult. Here are the basics: Don’t spend more than you have/are earning. Pay more than the minimum amount due on your cards and loans every single month (never pay late). Put money away into savings. Even five bucks each week is helpful. A credit score is based upon a number of things but rest assured your employers are going to look at your debt to income ratio—not just now but if they decide to hire you. They are also going to be looking at your payment histories. A metric ton of student loan debt doesn’t matter as much as whether or not you are making payments on it regularly and faithfully. These are just three things that you can do to help make sure that you’re building up your credit history and score. If you want to make sure that your credit doesn’t keep you out of your dream job, the sooner you can start using these tips, the more employable you will be! Enjoy this article? You’ve got time for another! Check out these related articles: 6 Tips For Managing Your Finances During A Career Transition The #1 Financial Mistake Career Changers Make How To Pay The Bills While Pursuing Your Dream Career Photo Credit: Shutterstock The post Can Bad Credit Make You Unemployable? appeared first on CAREEREALISM.
about 5 hours ago
There are two kinds of job searches, reactive and proactive. Most people use reactive job search strategies, which means they look for job openings and then apply to ones that interest them. So, when you send your resume to recruiters an...
There are two kinds of job searches, reactive and proactive. Most people use reactive job search strategies, which means they look for job openings and then apply to ones that interest them. So, when you send your resume to recruiters and respond to job board postings, you are really at the mercy of what comes up. In a proactive job search, you pick the companies and the jobs you are seeking. This way, you get the job that you chose and worked to get versus just hoping a good job comes your way through the recruiters and job boards. Before you do any job searching, make sure you have a really great resume and LinkedIn profile, since employers will use these to see if they wish to speak with you. There are four key steps in the proactive job search and these are: Identify which companies interest you Research the companies Leverage your network Reach out to hiring managers Identify Which Companies Interest You There are a number of ways you can identify companies. Start by making a list of 30-60 companies that you think you would love to work for. Talk to your friends and colleagues and see who they recommend. Note that LinkedIn has a very strong company search feature that can help. Go to LinkedIn and choose Companies and select Search and then move to the Search Companies tab. This brings up the Advanced Search options. LinkedIn gives you the option to focus your search using options in the “Refine By” column on the left. Here you can find companies by location, industry and size. If you find a company that might interest you, click on their profile, and see if it is one that interests you. If you like them, remember to click on the Follow button so company updates and messages are sent to you. Research The Companies The next step in the proactive job search is to learn more about the organization and determine if it is a place you really want to join. There are a number of ways to do this. The first thing to do is to visit the company web site and go to the About Us section. You can review the company history, products, and services and make sure you check out the News and Press Release section to see the latest newsworthy events. Make sure you look at their blog, if they have one, as it gives you a good idea of their areas of expertise and corporate culture. Also check them out on Twitter and remember to follow them. There are a number of excellent web tools and I highly recommend Glassdoor.com and Vault.com as they provide anonymous reviews of thousands of companies, salaries being paid, reviews of the corporate culture and evaluations of top executives. Sometimes they will even show you questions that are asked in an interview. Finally, don’t forget to search both Google for the company name, as you never know what will show up. Leverage Your Network Go back to LinkedIn’s Company Search capability and enter the name of the company that interests you. Note that when the listing comes up, it will tell you how many people in your network are employed there. This is a good place to start and you can reach out to these people for assistance. Tip:  People respond much better when they are asked for advice versus being asked to help you get a job. A good communication might be “I am looking at XYZ as a potential employer and was wondering if you could tell me about the corporate culture there?” You can also send this type of message to your extended network. Reach Out To Hiring Managers Now that you have identified companies that interest you, it is time to identify people who work there. Again, LinkedIn is a great tool here. Start by identifying the hiring manager and staff in the area you wish to join. Look for people who would be your peers and their managers. Now see what LinkedIn Groups they’ve joined. This is important because if you join the same group, you can now communicate with them for free without updating your LinkedIn account. Look to see if they have participated in any group discussions. Thi
about 5 hours ago
How do you change industries without experience? The short answer is networking. We’ll explain why. If you want a job in a new field, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have to start at the bottom. Talk to someone in the field w...
How do you change industries without experience? The short answer is networking. We’ll explain why. If you want a job in a new field, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have to start at the bottom. Talk to someone in the field who’s in the position you want to obtain. (Chatting with two or three people is even better.) Find out how they got experience. Have they seen people without the necessary experience getting a job with their company or another? What would it take for their firm to make an exception for that kind of role? Ask these types of questions and provide value to these people however you can, so they can become a trusted part of your network (and vice-versa). If you show how your skills and past experience are similar to what the company wants, the people in your network could even refer you for a job with their company, thanks to the attitude you demonstrated and your background. CAREEREALISM founder J.T. O’Donnell talks to hiring managers every day that say they can’t find talent. There are many capable unemployed people, but what they need is more involved than that. They define talent as someone that can give them exactly what they need. Nobody knows who the real talent is without interviewing them, so any candidate that doesn’t get an interview doesn’t have the chance to prove they’re the talent the company is looking for. In An Interview… When you’re in an interview, you’re being evaluated on three things: Personality, Aptitude, and Experience. It’s initially done in that order. You are immediately being judged on your personality. Could the interviewer see working with you each and every day? Do they feel connected to you? If something’s off, you don’t make the initial cut As you describe how you’ve done the things you have, they’ll examine your aptitude. Is that how they do [a certain task]? Would you be able to adapt to their situation? Do you have the transferable skill sets that can make it work between the two of you? After all of that, they look at your experience. Have you done this before? Do you have enough knowledge of the industry? In each phase of the hiring process, those three things come into play and even intensify. Hiring someone is an expensive purchase, so you absolutely need to get along with people, figure out how to do things and not need a lot of learning based on your past experience. What is outdated about job application these days? You send a resume with your past experience on it! That has almost nothing to do with your personality or aptitude, because it’s very hard to have them shine through (even on a great resume). This goes to show why networking is so important. It’s a way for you to exhibit your personality and aptitude, so you don’t get discounted because of your experience. There are plenty of people with enough experience, but not enough of the first two qualities. Networking is the solution to get into a field you don’t have prior experience in, for all of the above reasons. When you share how you dealt with problems (or opportunities) in the past, you’re exhibiting your aptitude. If you can communicate well with the people you’ve networked with, you have the right personality. Before they know anything about your experience (regardless of how much you have), you have already satisfied the two biggest requirements of any new hire. You might get the chance to learn how to do the job best with tools the company provides if you don’t have prior experience, so they can pick someone who will grow into the role, assuming you have the personality and aptitude to make it happen. Enjoy this article? You’ve got time for another! Check out these related articles: Video Tip: The Surprising Key To The Hidden Job Market How To Mention Unrelated Work Experience On Your Resume Using Military Experience in a Job Search Photo Credit: Shutters
about 5 hours ago
Did you know you should have strong action verbs strategically placed throughout your resume? Well, now you do! Most importantly, you want them at the beginning of the majority of your bullet points and accomplishment-based statements. P...
Did you know you should have strong action verbs strategically placed throughout your resume? Well, now you do! Most importantly, you want them at the beginning of the majority of your bullet points and accomplishment-based statements. Please do yourself —and every hiring manager out there—a favor; do not start your sentences with: Responsible for… worked with… or any other opening that lacks power and punch. These really do nothing for your resume or experience except hurt it. Hiring managers are not exactly captivated by the phrases, “responsible for” or “worked with.” They are just so boring and repetitive—and it’s because just about every job seeker out there uses them. Hiring managers want—need—words that jump off the page and captivate them. Here are a few examples of my favorite action words: Captivated Championed Directed Exceeded Pioneered Formulated Generated Intensified Leveraged Masterminded Maximized Mentored Optimized Orchestrated Re-engineered Spearheaded Structured Proliferate Recaptured Rejuvenated Truthfully, the list could go on. Don’t believe me? Use the synonym feature in Microsoft Word or go to Thesaurus.com. Be creative in your action verb choice, and choose strong words that convey ACTION to begin every sentence. These words communicate action, results, accomplishments, and contributions—which are all key components in creating a powerful and captivating resume. Enjoy this article? You’ve got time for another! Check out these related articles: Top 100 Most Powerful Resume Words 3 Steps To A Killer Resume 4 Rules For Every Resume Photo Credit: Shutterstock The post 20 Powerful Action Verbs To Kick Your Resume Up A Notch appeared first on CAREEREALISM.
about 5 hours ago
Want to know the key to acing an interview? Imagine stepping into a deep conversation with a friend. You may share the same posture, hand gestures, tone, and rate of speech. You can also tell when other people are in deep conversation by...
Want to know the key to acing an interview? Imagine stepping into a deep conversation with a friend. You may share the same posture, hand gestures, tone, and rate of speech. You can also tell when other people are in deep conversation by similarities in body language. What’s happening is mirroring. It’s subconsciously helping those in conversation maintain rapport through similarities observed from body language. There is a sense of ease talking with one another and a sense of the same mood. Establishing good rapport is vitally important during a job interview and it may make the difference between getting an offer or not. Remember, people hire people they like so, the next time you find yourself in a job interview, apply the technique of mirroring to help you get a better handle of the other person and to make everyone feel at ease with the conversation that is taking place. Mirroring is about observing the other person’s body language, which may include posture, hand gestures, facial expressions, tone, volume and rate of speech, and applying it to your body language. Of course, mirroring should be sincere and natural. Keep in mind the following tips to help observe body language and apply mirroring subtly. Body Posture Review body posture, which may include sitting upright, leaning forward and placing hands on the table. Wait at least 10 seconds after observing before making adjustments to your own body posture to match. Hand Gestures Watch how your contact makes hand gestures when talking and, if applicable, do the same when it is your turn to talk. Voice Review the tone, volume and rate of speech when your contact speaks and apply the same when you are responding with comment. Head Movement Look out for head gestures such as a nod or tilt of the head and respond accordingly. Facial Expressions Facial expressions may include a raised eyebrow or smile. Make a connection with your own facial expression to exemplify that you understand what the other person is saying and that you are engaged in the conversation. Be careful though. If mirroring is not done sincerely, you can come off as dishonest and it can ruin your chance of making a positive impression. Take care in applying the tips above and avoid mirroring negative connotations in body language. Negative connotations may include crossing arms over the chest, looking at the clock or watch, leaning the chin on the hand, yawning and turning the body sideways. Mirroring is a technique that is effective, easy to apply and offers a simple way for you to establish a connection in new ways by reinforcing perceptions and physical behaviors. Apply the technique during a job interview, networking, and many other instances in life to help build rapport and relationships with important constituents. Enjoy this article? You’ve got time for another! Check out these related articles: Interview Tips: Master Your Nonverbal Communication Using The Correct Body Language During An Interview 5 Things Every Employer Wants To Hear In An Interview Photo Credit: Shutterstock The post #1 Tip For Acing An Interview: Mirroring appeared first on CAREEREALISM.
about 5 hours ago
NOTE: This is a book excerpt with minor edits from Mandatory Greatness: The 12 Laws Of Driving Exceptional Performance by J.T. O’Donnell and Dale Dauten. Never trust a manager who loves everything you do. Next, she gave me an examp...
NOTE: This is a book excerpt with minor edits from Mandatory Greatness: The 12 Laws Of Driving Exceptional Performance by J.T. O’Donnell and Dale Dauten. Never trust a manager who loves everything you do. Next, she gave me an example of what can happen when you get a boss who has nothing to offer but compliments. (Think about that last phrase: nothing to offer but compliments. Slap.) She’d met a Steve Gavatorta, who’s now a speaker and sales trainer, but who was reminiscing about his days as a young sales guy. He went from college to one of the giant consumer products companies, selling to retailers. Although he was a solid prospect as a sales guy, his boss didn’t know what to do with him, so Gavatorta struggled, untrained and un-led. Because the boss was what Gavatorta called “an attaboy manager,” it never occurred to him how poorly he was doing. Then, one day, he accidentally got the truth. Another manager, not his boss, went with him on his rounds one day and wrote up a summary of woeful impressions, then sent it to Gavatorta by mistake. Reading that report, his first real analysis of his performance, and unaccustomed to taking criticism as a compliment, Gavatorta was shell-shocked. He said that after reading the report, he had to go lie down, and once he did, he began thinking, “This is my first job and I’m going to get fired. I’ll go back home a failure, and go to work in my father’s produce shop. This is the lowest day of my life.” But rather than crawl home, he decided to take a shot at changing companies, even taking the odd step of asking an executive at his current employer to write a recommendation. That executive agreed, but then made a call and got Gavatorta transferred – to work for the man who’d written the scathing report. Punishment? Just the opposite. The new manager was a teacher/coach, one who taught Gavatorta to sell and about whom he says, “He turned my career around in a matter of months and I worked for the company another 10 years. He taught me the fundamentals – he passed a skill set to me that I still use and teach to others.” Yvonne summed up that story by saying, “Notice that the turnaround happened on what he thought was the worst day of his life. It was actually the best day of his career, because he’d found a boss who was wiling and able to tell him what he was doing wrong and how to fix it.” I wondered aloud how his first boss, the lousy one, had gotten in that position and stayed there. But Yvonne didn’t share my doubt, shrugging it off. “What happens is that these bosses let people fail, blame the employee, and hire someone else. But leadership is not about getting rid of employees — any idiot can throw away assets — but about making them better, about teaching and training and even about saving them. Leadership is creating a better future for the company by creating better employees.” Mandatory Greatness is presented as a conversation between a high-powered business coach, Yvonne Wolfe (described as having “skirts of steel”), and a young manager who won a day of her coaching in a charity raffle. She observes him in his work, then offers a stark and startling analysis of him and his approach to his job: By imitating other managers he is making himself “a commodity product” destined for “inadvertent mediocrity.” She then teaches him to remake himself into a highly-valued teammate and a true leader using The 12 Laws of Driving Exceptional Performance. Sign Up For This Webinar! Join us on Wednesday, October 23 at 1 PM (EST) for this special presentation on these 12 Laws of Driving Exceptional Performance. Presenters: J.T. O’Donnell and Dale Dauten, authors of Mandatory Greatness: The 12 Laws Of Driving Exceptional Performance. NOTE: Can’t attend the live broadcast? No worries – A recorded version will be sent out to everyone who signed up within 48 hours. SIGN UP NOW ? Photo Credit: Shutterstock The post Mandatory Greatness: Never Trust A Manager Who Loves Everything
about 6 hours ago
Blogging has become a viable marketing tool for professionals who are applying for work or those who are trying to establish a personal brand. Below are some proven techniques for creating a great blog. Follow these five tips to create a...
Blogging has become a viable marketing tool for professionals who are applying for work or those who are trying to establish a personal brand. Below are some proven techniques for creating a great blog. Follow these five tips to create a professional blog that will impress the interviewers you’re talking to and attract the readers you’re looking for. 1. What’s Your Angle? Before you start writing, decide what the focus of your blog will be (often referred to as your niche). Thinly disguised ad copy won’t attract repeat readers or impress employers. Do you have expertise that you can use to inform or inspire your audience? Can you provide interesting commentary about news in your industry? Decide how you will add value that will keep your readers checking back for your next post. 2. Establish Your Voice Once you have an angle, don’t forget to add some personality. Avoid generic posts; personalize them with stories from your own professional experience. Letting your readers get to know you is the best way to create reader loyalty. Pitch your voice to match your professional goals. For example, if you’re trying to establish yourself as a financial expert then you should limit the amount of humor in your posts. If you’re a motivational coach, then make sure your posts are inspirational. If you find it hard to match your personal voice to your blog niche, you might want to reconsider your niche. 3. Grab Attention The first thing that readers notice about a blog post is the title. Readers are far more likely to read a post if they’re intrigued by its title. While there are no absolute rules for creating titles that grab attention, there are some general rules that established bloggers recommend: Short, simple titles are usually the most effective, but you need to provide enough information to let the reader know something about the subject of the post. Grabbing attention with a shocking or controversial title can also be effective as long as the post delivers useful information and doesn’t attempt to fool the audience into reading. 4. Use Social Media Successful bloggers use social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn to engage with new and repeat readers. Create profiles for your blog on social media websites and share a link each time you publish a post. Promote your blog by consistently using it as your user name on social media platforms. Include standard icons on your blog that provide readers with quick access to your social media profiles. 5. Keep It New Don’t let your blogging fall into a rut: repetition should be your enemy. Keep your blog content fresh by staying on top of news in your industry. Use Google Alerts to find new content on specific subjects. Allow your blog to evolve by trying new things and taking risks. Invite guest bloggers to contribute, interview leaders in your industry, add video or a podcast, create an infographic. On days when you don’t have an original idea for a post, write about something you’ve found on another blog or website and include a link for your readers. A final tip about blogging for your business or your personal brand: Don’t expect overnight results. In the beginning, you may feel discouraged because your readership is low. Keep writing high-quality posts on a regular basis, use social media to promote your blog and soon you may find that you have what it takes to create a great professional blog. Even if you never build a large readership, you can use your blog to demonstrate your professional abilities to potential customers or employers. This article was written by Social Media Outreach Coordinator, Harrison Kratz, on behalf of CAREEREALISM-Approved Partner, 2tor — an education technology company that partners with institutions of higher education such as University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to deliver their distance learning MBA online. Enjoy this article? You’ve got time for another! C
about 6 hours ago