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Well, maybe ...There is a movement on to put PEANUTS' Snoopy on California license plates. The official site, with photos of mock-up plates (like the one above) is here.Now there is a bill, signed by Governor Brown, that may put this all...
Well, maybe ...There is a movement on to put PEANUTS' Snoopy on California license plates. The official site, with photos of mock-up plates (like the one above) is here.Now there is a bill, signed by Governor Brown, that may put this all in action. The press release states:(Santa Cruz, CA) -- On Saturday, October 5, 2013, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed Assembly Bill 482 "California Cultural and Historical Endowment" by Assemblymember Toni G. Atkins (D-San Diego). The bill moves the California Cultural and Historical Endowment (CCHE) from the State Library to the Natural Resources Agency and lays the foundation to launch a Snoopy special interest license plate to support California museums. A campaign to put the beloved, comic beagle on license plates in California, and help the state's museums at the same time, has been underway for several years. Over 10,000 Californians have already expressed interest in purchasing a Snoopy special interest license plate by completing an online form atwww.snoopyplate.com. A statewide marketing campaign will be launched soon to pre-sell Snoopy license plates and the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) will begin issuing the plates upon receipt of 7,500 paid applications.The rest is here.
about 4 hours ago
Here's a new book about Bob Montana, the creator of Archie, and his life in the Lakes region of New Hampshire. But there's no Archie inside the book.THE NEW ENGLAND LIFE OF CARTOONIST BOB MONTANA: BEYOND THE ARCHIE COMIC STRIP by Carol L...
Here's a new book about Bob Montana, the creator of Archie, and his life in the Lakes region of New Hampshire. But there's no Archie inside the book.THE NEW ENGLAND LIFE OF CARTOONIST BOB MONTANA: BEYOND THE ARCHIE COMIC STRIP by Carol Lee Anderson chronicles the life of Bob Montana in New Hampshire.From NewHampshireLakesAndMountains.com: "What surprised me the most," said Anderson, "wasn't the fact that people don't know that local people and places were drawn into the Archie strip, but the fact that they aren't aware that Bob Montana had been a permanent, year-round resident of Meredith for thirty years. He raised his family there and drew the strip at his home on Meredith Neck." The book describes the development of the Archie comic, but Anderson feels that what will amaze readers the most is learning how much Montana contributed to Meredith, but to the state and the country as well. Surprisingly, little has been written about his life in the Lakes Region.In an interview with The Cocheco Times, Ms. Anderson thanks Bob's daughter Lynn, who works in the area, for her invaluable assistance. Ms. Anderson also cites that there will be no Archie art in the book. The book has 79 photos and art -- but no Archie. (Note: the link takes you to a PDF of the entire issue.)"Bob didn't want his friends to think he was all about the comic strip," said Anderson. "One of his friends told me that he used to say, 'What kind of person would you think I was if my ego and self worth were wrapped up in a comic strip?'"THE NEW ENGLAND LIFE OF CARTOONIST BOB MONTANA: BEYOND THE ARCHIE COMIC STRIP is published by History Press.
about 4 hours ago
Daily Cartoon - Wednesday October 9th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
Daily Cartoon - Wednesday October 9th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
about 9 hours ago
On a quickie break…
On a quickie break…
about 20 hours ago
Al Jaffee in his studio. Photo Alison Leigh Cowan for the New York Times.Comics Alliance reports that Al Jaffee will leave most of his art to the rare book and manuscript library at Columbia University.He was approached by KAren Green, a...
Al Jaffee in his studio. Photo Alison Leigh Cowan for the New York Times.Comics Alliance reports that Al Jaffee will leave most of his art to the rare book and manuscript library at Columbia University.He was approached by KAren Green, a Columbia librarian, about this at the 2012 New York Comicon. The extensive collection includes his Mad Magazine "Fold-Ins," which he has been creating since 1964, numerous drawings, and several comic strip proposals.
1 day ago
Daily Cartoon - Tuesday October 8th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
Daily Cartoon - Tuesday October 8th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
1 day ago
Here are three shots, taken in what looks like the same minute, in Louis Raemaekers' (1869-1956) studio at some point during The Great War. That's my guess, based on what's on his drawing board -- and the fact that he was th...
Here are three shots, taken in what looks like the same minute, in Louis Raemaekers' (1869-1956) studio at some point during The Great War. That's my guess, based on what's on his drawing board -- and the fact that he was the one private individual who exercised a real and great influence on the course of the 1914-18 War. There were a dozen or so people (emperors, kings, statesmen, and commanders-in-chief) who obviously, and notoriously, shaped policies and guided events. Outside that circle of the great, Louis Raemaekers stands conspicuous as the one man who, without any assistance of title or office, indubitably swayed the destinies of peoples. [New York Times 1956 obituary]Forgotten today, the Dutch-born Raemaekers, having heard of the atrocities the invading German army inflicted on the citizens of Belgium, went against the tide of refugees, secretly visiting Belgium to get the story first hand. He then went on a cartoon crusade, depicting what he heard. From Animation Resources "The Cartoonist Who Helped Win the First World War:"Raemaekers cartoons were instrumental in fighting against deeply entrenched American isolationism, and in 1917 the United States entered the war. Raemaekers quickly organized a lecture tour of the US and Canada, rallying the allies to support the French and mobilize against the Germans. The Christian Science Monitor said of Raemaekers, “From the outset his works revealed something more than the humorous or ironical power of the caricaturist; they showed that behind the mere pictorial comment on the war was a man who thought and wrought with a deep and uncompromising conviction as to right and wrong.”John Adcoock has a terrific write up on the man at his Yesterday's Papers blog here.
2 days ago
Daily Cartoon - Monday October 7th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
Daily Cartoon - Monday October 7th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
2 days ago
Daily Cartoon - Sunday October 6th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
Daily Cartoon - Sunday October 6th, 2013Like today's cartoon? Forward it to a friend, share it on Facebook, or tweet it on Twitter!Thanks!Andertoons.com | Browse Cartoons | Subscriptions | Custom Cartoons | Blog
3 days ago
Produced and Directed by Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera.Credits: Animation – Lew Marshall, Layout – Paul Sommer, Backgrounds – Dick Thomas, Written by Warren Foster, Story Director – Alex Lovy, Titles – Art Goble, Production Supervision – Ho...
Produced and Directed by Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera.Credits: Animation – Lew Marshall, Layout – Paul Sommer, Backgrounds – Dick Thomas, Written by Warren Foster, Story Director – Alex Lovy, Titles – Art Goble, Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.Voice Cast: Pixie, Professor, Monkey – Don Messick; Mr. Jinks, Dixie, Guy in Suit – Daws Butler.Music: Jack Shaindlin, Geordie Hormel, Spencer Moore.Episode: Huckleberry Hound Show K-051.First Aired: week of February 27, 1961.Plot: Jinks is at the mercy of an anti-gravity machine that keeps him in the air. This cartoon is a dud. Well, it’s not a dud if you like to see Mr. Jinks get bashed around without deserving it. Or if you like characters to spend screen time explaining what they’re going to do before doing it. Or if you like a comedy that has dialogue without punch lines. Or if you like a cartoon that relies on a catchphrase to bring it to a sudden end. It’s too bad. Warren Foster came up with a pretty funny premise that he could have filled up with try-and-fail type gags like he did with Sylvester in the Tweety cartoons at Warners. But the premise alone can’t carry the cartoon. And the dialogue is so uninspired, even Daws Butler can’t find many places for Jinksie to perform his customary word-mangling. It may simply have been a case that Foster had to quickly churn out another story that could be inexpensively animated. The cartoon was one of the last new Pixie and Dixies to be aired in the 1960-61 season. The first two scenes reveal Jinks has started a new job and the meeces check the want ads in the paper to see what it may be. Dixie: There it is. “Cats Wanted For Fur Factory.”Pixie: He wouldn’t want a job there. It’s just not funny. It could have been, even though Pixie is merely stating the obvious, but Don Messick gives the line a straight-forward read without any tinge of facetiousness or irony. We learn Jinks is being employed by a space scientist for a weightlessness experiment using a de-gravitising machine. The next scene features plenty of yapping between the scientist and a guy in a three-piece suit who is never identified. The scientist spends gobs of time explaining stuff then doing it.Professor: I’ll show you how it works. I have put a wire in the cat’s tie for an antenna. And when I turn on the “juice,” as we call it...Guy: Ha ha ha ha ha.Professor: Heh heh. Heh heh heh. Heh heh heh. Heh-um. I’m missing something here. What’s so funny about “juice”? I could understand if it was a pun, or even a bad pun. The scientist and the guy go off to lunch, leaving Jinks napping. That’s the cue for a giggling experimental monkey to get out of his cage and start playing with the machine, lifting Jinks up and down, crashing into floors and ceilings. The cartoon’s almost half over by the time this begins, by the way. Jinks first thinks he’s having a “night-time mare,” then that he’s suffering from “halu-kinations.” The monkey leaves the machine in the “up” position and hops away. Jinks crashes into the overhang of a roof. “Pixie and Dixie will never believe this,” he says, crawling down the side of the building. We are to gather the meeces are his friends in this cartoon, otherwise he wouldn’t care what they believe. Cut to the next scene. Jinks arrives at the door of his home holding a heavy metal garbage can (do they still make those?) and makes a dash for his bed. He doesn’t get there, rising to the ceiling instead. “Help, fellas!” cries the cat. “Get me down. I’ll have to walk around grasping an ashcan all my life. But if I stay up here, I’ll starve to death.” Dixie tries to toss Jinks a small rope to pull him down, but it hooks around the cat’s tail instead. Jinks looks at us and disgustedly says “Meeces!” That may be the best dialogue in the cartoon. Meanwhile, the scientist and suit guy run past the same window seven times. The scientist notices the cat is gone and his machine is overheating. But he’s outside. How can he tell? (No, he doesn’t look in the window; he
4 days ago