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Anthony Gruppuso-USA TODAY Sports It’s hard to imagine that the Chicago White Sox will be as bad as they were in 2013 heading into next year. On paper, they’re not nearly as poor a club as their record would indicate, and are...
Anthony Gruppuso-USA TODAY Sports It’s hard to imagine that the Chicago White Sox will be as bad as they were in 2013 heading into next year. On paper, they’re not nearly as poor a club as their record would indicate, and are just a year removed from nearly grabbing a playoff spot out of the American League Central. Without a strong farm system to fall on, the White Sox will likely focus on free agency this winter to improve their club and try to get back into the postseason. We already know who at least one of their free agent targets will be once the market opens up, and that is outfielder Curtis Granderson. There are multiple reasons that Granderson would be a fit for the White Sox. Part of the appeal, for both sides, is the fact that Granderson is a hometown kid. It would be a move that would strike big with fans after a miserable 2013 season, and Granderson might find that appeal to be great. Obviously he’s a fit for them in the lineup as well. Granderson brings the necessary power to the mix, and an ability to get on base that this team currently lacks. He’d improve them greatly in each of those areas, as well as defensively. That aspect of it really goes without saying. It’s just a matter of money. What once looked like a major contract heading into this winter’s offseason now won’t cost nearly as much, as injuries limited him greatly during the season. That’s not to say that price won’t be a factor, and we don’t know how much money the White Sox have to play around with, but it won’t be as large as it could have been. It remains to be seen whether the White Sox could actually pull off a deal to bring Granderson to Chicago. They’re not exactly the New York Yankees, who offer up a much better chance at winning. But at the same time, Granderson may find passing up an opportunity to return home is too good to pass up. He’s a fit in that respect, and on paper. The Sox should push hard to bring him home to the Windy City.
about 2 hours ago
Jake Peavy has had a rollercoaster career. The 32-year-old righthander won the National League Cy Young award in 2007 while pitching for the San Diego Padres. A three-time all-star, he twice led the NL in ERA and strikeouts. He has also ...
Jake Peavy has had a rollercoaster career. The 32-year-old righthander won the National League Cy Young award in 2007 while pitching for the San Diego Padres. A three-time all-star, he twice led the NL in ERA and strikeouts. He has also suffered a career-threatening injury. In parts of five seasons with the Chicago White Sox, […] Read more Jake Peavy news
about 7 hours ago
Jake Peavy has had a rollercoaster career. The 32-year-old righthander won the National League Cy Young award in 2007 while pitching for the San Diego Padres. A three-time all-star, he twice led the NL in ERA and strikeouts. He has also ...
Jake Peavy has had a rollercoaster career. The 32-year-old righthander won the National League Cy Young award in 2007 while pitching for the San Diego Padres. A three-time all-star, he twice led the NL in ERA and strikeouts. He has also suffered a career-threatening injury. In parts of five seasons with the Chicago White Sox, he failed to put up the numbers he did in San Diego. Last night, he did what the Red Sox had in mind when they acquired him at the non-waiver trade deadline: He made a quality start in a postseason game. Peavy talked about the evolution of his career — including mechanical changes related to the injury — late in the regular season. —— Peavy on his 2010 injury: “I’ve changed quite a bit over my career. When you spend years doing what you do, you’re always looking for ways to better yourself. That’s whether it’s with new pitches, mental preparation or physical preparation. So much goes into what we do. “Over time, your body and your mechanics change. You have to find out what works well with what you can physically do at each point of your career. “I’d done the same thing basically my whole career, and then in 2009, I got hurt. I came back from that ankle injury trying to help our team make the playoffs. That was in Chicago, where I had been traded. I came back on a right ankle that wasn’t the best in the world. “I mechanically changed, not really knowing it. Pitching on an ankle that wasn’t right caused me to stay a lot taller and not drive toward home plate. Therefore, my arm angle changed. I had been traded in the middle of the season, so I didn’t have coaches who had seen me for years and years. The White Sox didn’t know I was that much different. “We didn’t really realize until about halfway through 2010 when we went back through some old footage of how I was throwing when I was in San Diego. It was a lot different than how I was throwing in Chicago, and it led to a pretty major arm injury. “When I came back in 2010, I was hearing things from Coop — Don Cooper, the pitching coach over there — I hadn’t heard before. ‘Get on top of the ball; stay tall.’ It was different lingo from different coaches. Everybody has their own verbiage. “I started realizing my stuff wasn’t the same, and that my arm was starting to hurt, in spring training. A few months into the season, we were looking at video. Juan Nieves was with us and he said, ‘You don’t look anything like this anymore.’ My arm angle was quite a bit different. I was standing tall and not using my legs. When you do something your whole life, you can’t suddenly change and not have soreness and problems with your arm. I had three or four MRIs and cortisone shots before I eventually blew out. I ended up having surgery nobody else in the game had ever had.” (A tendon and a muscle were reattached to his shoulder with a series of stitches and a titanium anchor.) On his mechanics: “I was a low-three-quarters guy. People talk about how you kind of sling the ball — you’re kind of a sidewinder — and I don’t necessarily not like that [description]. At the same time, I’m not just slinging it and hoping it goes where I want it to go. There are certain mechanics behind the way somebody throws. Even though it sometimes looked like I was out of control, there was a lot of thought and precision going into what I was doing. “Everybody in the world has a way they throw a baseball. They start that from the time they’re a youngster and go from there. You can look at guys who people say have the best mechanics in the world, and their arms may not last. You have other guys who throw in an unorthodox fashion and never have an arm injury. I don’t think anybody has it down to an exact science. But I also don’t think anybody is going to watch me and say, ‘Hey, son, watch the way Jake Peavy throws. Let’s mimic that.’ Not too many people are teaching their kids to throw the way I throw. “Up until this point in time, I’ve been a li
about 8 hours ago
"It's hard to say anyone is the best." Hawk Harrelson said that sentence -- or a derivation thereof -- a handful of times over the course of the season. Meanwhile (as Hawk might say), he spent the entire season disproving that very idea...
"It's hard to say anyone is the best." Hawk Harrelson said that sentence -- or a derivation thereof -- a handful of times over the course of the season. Meanwhile (as Hawk might say), he spent the entire season disproving that very idea. While the Ford A. Frick Award finalist is known for his catch phrases and homerism around baseball, his most locally appreciated trait is his tendency to tag players and teams with superlatives. He's Banksy with historical identifiers. After hearing one game with a number of "bests" and other adjectives ending in "-est" during a game in mid-May, I started logging as many specific superlatives as I could hear. Over the course of the season, many others (BuehrleMan, MarketMaker, Trooper, Uribe Down, 3E8, Steve_p and Mark among them) also conditioned themselves to pick up keywords. Some of these titles are generally agreed upon by baseball fans. Others need a moment of consideration, but ultimately make sense. And then he drops some onion-like labels that require quite a bit of peeling -- a player who is the best at performing one very particular skill of one facet of the game over a specific time frame. Harrelson has already declared him the tops before you even thought of thinking about it. It gets kind of ridiculous, but it's good, harmless fun in the end, and sometimes serves as discussion fodder, too. I counted clear superlatives, as well as qualifiers like "one of," "might be," "arguably" and others. In most cases, Harrelson didn't provide an alternative, and some categories were so hard to unravel that nobody else could do it themselves. After eliminating some and combining others, we ended up tallying 122 Hawk Harrelson superlatives over the last 4½ months of White Sox broadcasts. I've grouped them into categories with notes when warranted. Hitting (42) One of the best approaches to the pitch in all of baseball: Jose Bautista One of the greatest approaches in creating hang time in all of baseball: Jose Bautista The best top hands in all of baseball: Adrian Beltre, Julio Franco, Yan Gomes, Adam Rosales, Garry Sheffield (All of these players received "one-of" praise over the course of the season. Beltre, Franco and Sheffield are renowned for their vicious cuts and line drives. Gomes seems premature, but had a good year. Adam Rosales was DFA'd roughly 38 times in three weeks this season.) One of the best in the league at hitting good pitching well: Billy Butler In Hawk's top five for hitting the ball hard: Billy Butler The smartest right-handed hitters over the last 40 years: Miguel Cabrera, Manny Ramirez and Frank Thomas The world's best hitter, and might be the best one we have ever seen before it's over: Miguel Cabrera Only fearless player at the plate: Tony Conigliaro Possibly the most good under-the-radar hitter in the major leagues: Allen Craig ("Good" would seem to be assumed in any "under-the-radar" conversation.) More hits -- on a guy who has had a shift implemented against him -- taken away than any hitter Hawk has ever seen: Adam Dunn Had some of the best plate coverage against the Sox: Alcides Escobar The fastest a ball has been hit to right field by a right-handed hitter this season: Courtesy of Dayan Viciedo Hardest-hit line drives to right-center: Julio Franco Hit one of the longest home runs he has ever seen hit to left-center since Progressive Field was built: Avisail Garcia Most short-and-quick swing from a left-handed White Sox hitter. Conor Gillaspie Hits more balls off his feet and legs than anyone in the league: Alejandro De Aza Greatest first-ball fastball hitter we have ever seen: Vladimir Guerrero Best offensive player Hawk has ever seen: Rickey Henderson Quickest home run trot: Adam Rosales (This one is scientifically proven. Before Rosales, Harrelson said Frank Howard was the quickest.) Hit the ball farther to right field than any right-handed hitter: Bo Jackson Hit the ball farther to left field than any left-handed hitte
about 9 hours ago
Semien will potentially be doing things worth writing about. // Mandatory Credit: Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports The White Sox need to find an entire offense between now and April, and while much of that will need to be bought at a prem...
Semien will potentially be doing things worth writing about. // Mandatory Credit: Rick Osentoski-USA TODAY Sports The White Sox need to find an entire offense between now and April, and while much of that will need to be bought at a premium from abroad, nothing provides optimism about in-house position prospects like the Arizona Fall League. The helium-injected showcase got rolling this Tuesday and two White Sox infielders are already grabbing attention. Marcus Semien is rolling in after his Southern League MVP and three-level season and Micah Johnson is looking to flash his speed and re-trigger some of the offensive momentum that he lost after he left Low-A. After one day, well, at least MLB.com’s Bernie Pleskoff is impressed. #WhiteSox Micah Johnson is the player I want to see more this fall. He has blazing speed with good contact. Nice defensive player as well. — Bernie Pleskoff (@BerniePleskoff) October 8, 2013 @SpaldingBalls I like him and I think he can play both offense and defense. Can run as well. — Bernie Pleskoff (@BerniePleskoff) October 8, 2013 This came after an opening day where each players had two hits, Johnson stole three bases and Semien hit a two-out, game-tying single in the ninth inning. Since Dayan Viciedo clubbed a home run in his first game after being recalled in 2011, we know that superstar status is guaranteed for both. What a relief. The pair represent most of the White Sox intrigue at the AFL. Semien needs to revert back to the dominant form that characterized his MiLB season, as he’ll need all the momentum to force his way onto the Opening Day White Sox infield. Also, it will be interesting to see if his power responds to the ludicrous offensive environment. Johnson will be more legitimately challenged. He’s only cleaned up on Low-A pitching, so even if the league is entirely composed of Terry Doyles, it would represent an important new tier of pitching sophistication for him to conquer. Also, stealing 82 bases in A-ball is doable without an advanced baserunning approach and feel for reading pitchers, less so against higher-level catching prospects. So far Johnson seems like he’ll get the hang of it. There will be some pitchers of note present as well. Right-hand starter Chris Bassitt, a 16th round pick that FanGraphs’ Marc Hulet identified as a sleeper prospect, just completed a season of nearly 150 innings of work and smoothly handled a mid-season transition to Double-A (3.08 ERA overall). Also present will be right-hander reliever Kevin Vance, who struck out 84 batters in 69 innings in Double-A in 2013 after being taken in the 19th round of the 2011 draft. Charlie Leesman will be around as well and it would be nice if his ability to throw strikes would return, but even complete annihilation would obviously have some caveats. Mentioning Terry Doyle here is also key, since he’s the most recent iteration of “middling organizational arm goes bonkers in AFL and goes on to prove it doesn’t mean much.” If an older Leesman spends the month tricking green hitters, it doesn’t make him dark horse for the starting rotation. Left-hander Stephen McCray will also be present and his inclusion in this paragraph rather than the previous is not an accident. Heading up the sad train of toolsy outfielders is Jared Mitchell and Brandon Jacobs, who looks to pivot from being a disaster (.237/.291/.327 in Double-A Birmingham) since joining the organization. At this point, burning down the AFL isn’t going to dismiss concerns about either of them, especially Mitchell, who can flash athleticism-driven barrages over short bursts. Speaking of toolsy outfielders coming off rough years, Trayce Thompson is headed to the Venezuelan League alongside first basemen Andy Wilkins. Carlos Sanchez looks to be on the roster as well. More at-bats will offer more opportunities for Thompson to match the gains he made in contact rate this season with his prodigious natural
about 9 hours ago
Current Series Athletics lead the series 2-1 Fri 10/04 WP: Max Scherzer (1 - 0) SV: Joaquin Benoit LP: Bartolo Colon (0 - 1) ...
Current Series Athletics lead the series 2-1 Fri 10/04 WP: Max Scherzer (1 - 0) SV: Joaquin Benoit LP: Bartolo Colon (0 - 1) 3 - 2 win Sat 10/05 WP: Grant Balfour (1 - 0) LP: Al Alburquerque (0 - 1) 0 - 1 loss Mon 10/07 WP: Jarrod Parker (1 - 0) SV: Grant Balfour LP: Anibal Sanchez (0 - 1) 3 - 6 loss Oakland Athletics Athletics Nation @ Detroit Tigers Bless You Boys Tuesday, Oct 8, 2013, 4:07 PM CDT Comerica Park Dan Straily vs Doug Fister Sunny. Winds blowing in from center field at 5-10 m.p.h. Game time temperature around 65. Complete Coverage > Thu 10/10 8:07 PM CDT
about 23 hours ago
Frank being his typically bubbly self. // Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports As much as I love wallowing in sorrow and loooove making sardonic jokes about crappy baseball, we’re done with stewing in 2013. At least we...
Frank being his typically bubbly self. // Mandatory Credit: Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports As much as I love wallowing in sorrow and loooove making sardonic jokes about crappy baseball, we’re done with stewing in 2013. At least we’re done stewing in a way that doesn’t look forward for the new year. These “exit interviews” will be going over the entire 40-man roster and looking to see how each player does or does not fit into the White Sox future. The term “exit interview” is usually used when an employee is leaving the company. I took that into consideration…and kept it. Frank De Los Santos – Fairly anonymous trade acquisition. Potential LOOGY? (Note: Every left-handed pitcher is a potential LOOGY. Maybe every left-handed baseball player. Don’t rule out Alejandro De Aza being called upon to pitch to Prince Fielder in 2014) Age by 2014 Opening Day: 26 Contract: He’s never made the majors, and should have two option years left. Relevant stats: Across Rookie Ball, High-A, but mostly Triple-A in 2013: 30 games (two starts), 38.2 IP, 40 H, 4.89 ERA, 3 HR, 26 K, 14 BB, 1.86 K/BB Interpretation: The trade to acquire De Los Santos was not heavily publicized for immediately apparent reasons. He is NOT the return for Jesse Crain. Emblematic split: Triple-A left-handers only hit .158 vs. De Los Santos, but they also had eight walks to six strikeouts. Pre-season expectations: It was not a quick search to find someone with something substantive to say about their expectations about De Los Santos’ 2013 campaign, but The Process Report had this to offer : His fastball is lively and can touch the mid-90s. But the blemish on De Los Santos has always been lackluster secondary stuff. It isn’t obvious that De Los Santos has improved in that regard, as Adam Sobsey lamented about his fastball infatuation during the season. Despite mediocre strikeout rates, De Los Santos has posted solid groundball rates, and has the reputation for challenging hitters. Unless something has clicked for De Los Santos with his secondary offerings, the best you can hope for is that he develops into a situational reliever. He’s likely to begin next season in Durham. This is less of a prediction than a scouting report (which is needed because who is Frank De Los Santos?) and a warning (which is also needed because it’s very possible he is not a major leaguer). Quote of the year: Santos does not appear to be any minor league beat writer’s go-to-guy for quotes. Senior director of baseball operations Dan Fabian had this nice thing to say, however: “It’s just delivery,” Fabian said. “He’s one of those guys who needs a more consistent delivery in order to throw strikes, and if he does that, he has the stuff to succeed at this level.” This is also not a quote, but apparently the origins of De Los Santos’ baseball career lie in unspeakable personal tragedy. Frank’s story: De Los Santos’ workload this season was hampered by an early-season trip to the disabled list in May for apparently unspecified reasons and he didn’t work his way back to Triple-A Durham until mid-July. While health issues could explain why he never found his control in 2013, it doesn’t sound like injury troubles are a one-off issue for De Los Santos and still don’t explain away his inability to blow away lower-level hitters. Over the course of 2013, the Rays transitioned from just interested enough in De Los Santos to spend a roster spot to keep him around to making him the first target in an effort to clear space. Assessment: This is a flier in the truest sense at this point. The Sox could use some LOOGY depth and someone who can touch 96 mph from the left-hand side and poses no obligation to be promoted for the next two years is still more fun to have in Triple-A than Zach Stewart. If he figures it all out, a mid-2014 promotion is possible. Never hearing fr
1 day ago
The Arizona Fall League begins its season on October 8 and goes until November 14. The White Sox have sent RHP Chris Bassit, LHSP Charlie Leesman, LHP Stephen McCray, RHP Kevin Vance, INF Micah Johnson, SS Marcus Semien, OF Brandon Jaco...
The Arizona Fall League begins its season on October 8 and goes until November 14. The White Sox have sent RHP Chris Bassit, LHSP Charlie Leesman, LHP Stephen McCray, RHP Kevin Vance, INF Micah Johnson, SS Marcus Semien, OF Brandon Jacobs and OF Jared Mitchell to play for the Glendale Desert Dogs, along with prospects from the Dodgers, Marlins, Reds and Twins. The Venezuelan Winter League starts play on October 10. Trayce Thompson and Andy Wilkins will play for Tiburones La Guaira. Carlos Sanchez is likely to play for the Tiburones, as well. Avisail Garcia has played for Caribes de Anzoategui in the past. Nestor Molina has played for Cardenales de Lara in the past. The Dominican Winter League starts play on October 18. The 2013 Rookie Draft had RHP Euclides Leyer going to Tigres Del Licey, RHP Fracellis Montas and RHP Braulio Ortiz to Leones Del Escogido and LHP Jefferson Olacio to Toros del Este. This does not mean that they will play, simply that they are now property of those teams. Alejandro De Aza is confirmed to be playing for the Toros. Frank de los Santos is on the Toros' roster; RHP Simon Castro is on the Tigres' roster, Leury Garcia is on the Gigantes del Cibao roster; and Santos Rodriguez is on the Leones' roster. The Puerto Rican Winter League begins in November. Hector Santiago has played for Gigantes de Carolina in the past..
1 day ago
So the White Sox are interested in signing Curtis Granderson, eh? Seems predictable. Kenny Williams coveted Granderson at one point in time, and he’s shown a willingness to go get players he likes regardless of how many years have passed...
So the White Sox are interested in signing Curtis Granderson, eh? Seems predictable. Kenny Williams coveted Granderson at one point in time, and he’s shown a willingness to go get players he likes regardless of how many years have passed. Does Granderson returning to his hometown make any sense? Let’s get something out of the way: money matters. I don’t know exactly where to draw the line, but a line exists. On one side of it I’m all for the White Sox acquiring him, it makes sense. He provides leadership and it improves the team on the field. What it could also do is defer funds better spent elsewhere. How much Granderson wants to earn is a big part of making such a play. In 2011 he finished fourth in AL MVP voting. That feat activated a clause in his contract that elevated the price of his 2013 option from $13M to $15M. It was a steadily escalating contract, backloaded, to use the parlance of our times. He basically averaged a $3M raise each year in the six years he was inked. Most folks are looking for raises when changing employers and there’s a good chance Granderson shares this sentiment. A serious hometown discount is going to be needed for the soon to be 33 year-old to sign in Chicago without fan backlash about spending money for the sake of spending money. Alex Rios would have been getting $12.5M of the Chairman’s money had he not been shipped off to Texas. To me that makes an absolute ceiling for Granderson’s payout, but even that amount may still be unwise if it, say, cripples the chances of acquiring Jose Daniel Abreu. Would a return to Chicago make sense for Granderson? (John E. Sokolowski-USA TODAY Sports) Is Granderson better than Rios? Is he better than the other outfield options that would be taking at-bats should he not sign? Yes and yes. Last season was a bit of a lost one for Granderson, having had to deal with two freak injuries after being hit by pitches. In just short of 250 plate appearances he coughed up a .229/.317/.407 line, production not that far off what can be expected generally from Dayan Viciedo and Alejandro De Aza. Nobody owes Viciedo or De Aza any more MLB at-bats. Viciedo is not yet a lost cost, but it’s at the point where your waiting is more and more likely to be in vain with each back-wrenching strikeout. Alejandro is certainly playable, but his numbers are trending in the wrong direction and a crash could very well be in his future. On the other hand, Granderson’s numbers suggest a healthy year would yield healthy numbers. An OPS north of .800 would not be a stretch and if he approached that it would exceed anything a 2013 White Sox hitter had to offer. The only thing looking good for each of the incumbents in this situation is their age, but that only becomes a large issue if the Sox are entertaining a long-term commitment to Granderson. The White Sox have spent some time building a reputation. It’s a very Kenny Williams-driven reputation, but even with Hahn at the helm they’ve yet to free themselves of it. The previously mentioned ‘once-coveted veteran finally achieved’ is a part of it. The other more recently obvious part is the love of a high-strikeout hitter. Curtis Granderson does nothing to help out the high K rate of the White Sox, having once K’d a Dunnian 195 times in a single season. What does this say about a rebuild? Are they rebuilding if they go grab an outfielder off on the free agent market? Contrary to popular belief, rebuilding teams are not required to exclusively carry players under the age of the 30. In fact, veteran presences are almost always part of the mix. It’s the failure to compete that makes a team a rebuilding one. Even the Astros carried a 35 year-old Carlos Pena to start the year in 2013, and he’s awful to boot. One could argue that another season for Adam Dunn’s contract to disappear and the rebuild is in full effect since that would drop team salary a great deal lower than it already is, which is set to be lower than it’s b
1 day ago
Whether it's health care, phones or awful ballgames, too many choices can pose a problem. At least that's what I encountered when I tried ranking the worst White Sox games of 2013 The first sweep came up with a couple dozen games, and ...
Whether it's health care, phones or awful ballgames, too many choices can pose a problem. At least that's what I encountered when I tried ranking the worst White Sox games of 2013 The first sweep came up with a couple dozen games, and in the process of weeding out a handful that didn't measure up, I ended up playing a sadistic game of Memory (find the matching Jason Giambi walkoffs!). Too many games resembled each other to make a ranking both interesting and meaningful, and by the last month of the season, I'd wager that we all became too numb to feel a difference between them. So instead, I called an audible and sorted the games by the five ways the Sox stunned their own fans, highlighting the most "impressive" one of the bunch, followed by its identical or fraternal twins. If I missed any, let me know. The blown lead Archetype: Tigers 7, White Sox 6 on Sept. 22 Not only did the White Sox carry a 6-0 lead into the ninth inning and lose, but it also robbed Chris Sale of a much-needed win. While this game lacked the uglier moments of other losses, the history-making improbability puts it a cut above the rest. SEE ALSO: Sept. 24: Indians 5, White Sox 4(Giambi walkoff erases comeback in ninth) Sept. 7: Orioles 4, White Sox 3 (Reed blown save extends winless road trip) July 31: Indians 6, White Sox 5 (Reed blown save erases rare Jeff Keppinger heroics) June 28: Indians 9, White Sox 8 (Reed blows three-run lead to cap off awful doubleheader) June 11: Blue Jays 7, White Sox 5 (Jose Bautista proves Hawk Harrelson wrong) The total embarrassment The archetype: Indians 14, White Sox 3 on Sept. 12 Two quick out-of-hand innings led to Robin Ventura's shortest press conference of the season. Your browser does not support iframes. SEE ALSO: Sept. 10: Tigers 9, White Sox 1 (Conor Gillaspie's three-error game) Sept. 2: Yankees 9, White Sox 1(Eight-run third inning is the "most embarrassing" of Harrelson's career) July 23: Tigers 6, White Sox 2(Twice as many errors as runs) May 13: Twins 10, White Sox 3 (Awful defense forces early practice the next day) June 28: Indians 19, White Sox 10 (Punch-drunk play; Casper Wells pitched) The crosstown letdown The archetype: Cubs 7, White Sox 0 on May 27 After reaching .500 with a three-game sweep of Miami, the Sox opened a two-and-two series with the Cubs by playing awful defense and getting two-hit by Jeff Samardzija. They never sniffed .500 again. SEE ALSO: May 29: Cubs 9, White Sox 3 May 30: Cubs 8, White Sox 3 July 9: Cubs 8, White Sox 2 The slow death by baserunning The archetype: Astros 4, White Sox 3 on June 15 Jordan Danks is picked off of second for the final out of the game. While the Sox committed multiple basepath blunders on other days, Danks' futile pleading as the worst team in baseball celebrates is one of those indelible moments. SEE ALSO: Aug. 4: Tigers 3, White Sox 2 (Two misreads cost the Sox two chances at the go-ahead run) July 27: Royals 1, White Sox 0 (Alex Rios couldn't tag on sac fly-looking ball in ninth) The Pyrrhic victory The archetype: White Sox 5, Mets 4 on June 25 Speaking of indelible moments: SEE ALSO: June 5: White Sox 7, Mariners 5(White Sox blow a 5-0 lead in the 14th) May 6: White Sox 2, Royals 1(Jordan Danks' solo shot erases his own game-jeopardizing baserunning blunder)
1 day ago