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Strange Fantasy #9's great cover is followed by an panel that promises high horror: And the tale delivers on its promise. The guillotine theme adds plenty of oomph in what could have been a typical ghost story. Nicely executed,...
Strange Fantasy #9's great cover is followed by an panel that promises high horror: And the tale delivers on its promise. The guillotine theme adds plenty of oomph in what could have been a typical ghost story. Nicely executed,...
about 1 hour ago
TweetDynamite have started teasing projects this week, with the arrival of three images promising a project from Greg Pak, Fred Van Lente, and Frank Barbiere. Each of the teasers – released since Monday – have gradually start...
TweetDynamite have started teasing projects this week, with the arrival of three images promising a project from Greg Pak, Fred Van Lente, and Frank Barbiere. Each of the teasers – released since Monday – have gradually started building up a phrase, which presumably when completed will form the tagline for whatever the writers have planned. “What Is The” has been revealed so far, so we’ll either get an answer tomorrow and Friday… or this is a biography of Alex Trebek. #call_to_action h4{padding:0px 5px;} #social-essentials {margin: 0 0 10px 0;}
about 1 hour ago
Just ahead of New York Comic Con, Dark Horse has announced Mandala, an upcoming sci-fi graphic novel by Stuart Moore and Bruce Zick. The first chapter is available beginning today on Dark Horse Digital for $2.99. In Mandala, humanity is ...
Just ahead of New York Comic Con, Dark Horse has announced Mandala, an upcoming sci-fi graphic novel by Stuart Moore and Bruce Zick. The first chapter is available beginning today on Dark Horse Digital for $2.99. In Mandala, humanity is secretly enslaved by a mind-control cage galled the GRID, and it’s up to Mike Morningstar [...]
about 1 hour ago
Here we have the third teaser image from Dynamite Entertainment. Previously we got Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente along with the phrases “The Terrors Return…” and “The Future Fights Back…” Plus we have &#...
Here we have the third teaser image from Dynamite Entertainment. Previously we got Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente along with the phrases “The Terrors Return…” and “The Future Fights Back…” Plus we have “What Is…” Now we can add Frank Barbiere, “The Power Consumes…” and “The“. Three writers, three catch phrase and a question… “What is the…?” I’m still leaning towards it being ALF. We’ll get another clue tomorrow before the big reveal on Friday. Frank Barbiere And The Power Consumes Dynamite
ALF
about 1 hour ago
Posted On Today at 01:57:13 pm EDT by Blargh [Reply] [Quote] [New] Quote:Hi all. Long time no post. Anyhow, I've caught the first two episodes of Agents of SHIELD. So far, so good, but I'm still crossing my fingers and hoping ...
Posted On Today at 01:57:13 pm EDT by Blargh [Reply] [Quote] [New] Quote:Hi all. Long time no post. Anyhow, I've caught the first two episodes of Agents of SHIELD. So far, so good, but I'm still crossing my fingers and hoping for some of my favorite supers to show up. So it occurred to me this week that the Grant Ward character uses named, possibly AI flying robots similar to Armada. It's probably a stretch and the name is obviously different, but does anyone know the rules on minor Spiderman characters appearing in TV or movies? They obviously couldn't use the Green Goblin, but what about guys like Cardiac? ...I don't know why they couldn't use Green Goblin and not Cardiac. There's nothing that's been said about the Sony media writes on Spider-Man that would include some Spidey villains but not others (with the notable Kingpin exception, which was part of Daredevil rights before Fox let them revert back to Marvel). It is known that Marvel, post Disney merger, renegotiated the animated television rights for the few franchises that are still held by other movie studios, that being the F4, X-Men, and Spider-Man. This probably extends to video games as well. It is generally accepted that the rights held by outside studios (Sony with Spider-Man, Fox with F4 and X) aren't so much movie rights but live action rights. These re-negotiated animated rights probably led to the early demise of Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes, Spectacular Spider-Man, and Wolverine and the X-Men. So no, we won't be getting any Spider-Man or Spider-Man related stuff in SHIELD. And there's really no need to. There's so much to draw from and most of Spider-Man's villains probably wouldn't work too well in a universe without him. And the few that would probably have a Avengers/larger MU character that is close enough to work. We'll still have Ultimate Spider-Man (unfortunately), and Spidey might pop up in the related shows "Avengers Assemble" and "Hulk and the Agents of SMASH" but that's about it.
about 1 hour ago
Posted On Today at 01:49:56 pm EDT by Blargh [Reply] [Quote] [New] Would it make you feel better if this didn't use the Superior adjective? I thought it was a pretty good story. No, it didn't play into Infinity continuity hea...
Posted On Today at 01:49:56 pm EDT by Blargh [Reply] [Quote] [New] Would it make you feel better if this didn't use the Superior adjective? I thought it was a pretty good story. No, it didn't play into Infinity continuity heavily but it shouldn't have to. A good writer can still write their own story while taking into account the larger universe while, at the same time, not making their stories dictated by the larger universe. I really enjoyed the book and didn't even notice it wasn't a Yost penned story until I hit the end of the issue.
about 1 hour ago
The GoodTons of stuff happening in this issue! The crew continues to figure out how to trap a host and get it out of the house. Trick gets possessed by a ghost. The crew ends up staying at the Trask mansion past dark... cue the ghosts!I'...
The GoodTons of stuff happening in this issue! The crew continues to figure out how to trap a host and get it out of the house. Trick gets possessed by a ghost. The crew ends up staying at the Trask mansion past dark... cue the ghosts!I've said it before, and I'll say it again: I love the hell out of this book. This is a story that could easily be jumped right into and has the possibility of rushing through things way too fast, but writer Joshua Williamson does the right thing and eases the reader into this world and story. We're four issues in and Williamson gives the readers a new piece of the puzzle each issue. The book is paced extremely well and the character development here is stellar.The way Goran Sudzuka draws the ghosts, at the end of the issue, really works well. Normally, in most books, ghosts are full bodied and transparent. What Sudzuka does is just uses black to outline and minor details to draw the ghosts. It's a really cool and spooky effect that adds a lot to the overall feel of the book. Issue #4 ends with one heck of a cliffhanger as the reader finds out what actually happens when the sun goes down at the Trask Mansion, and it's not good. This series is great with these reveal pages. They really keep the reader engaged and wondering what's going to happen in the next month. It will have you hooked in. The BadMy only real problem with this entire issue was a consistent one. The shading/inking was really bizarre. Instead of using darker colors to shade, the artist (not sure if it was Goran Sudzuka or Miroslac Mrva) heavily shadows everything, and in a few scenes, it looks really awkward, like when Jay is stopped by King, and the shadow from the brim of his hat goes over his forehead and eyes, except his eyes are normally colored, not shaded at all. They awkwardly pop. The VerdictGHOSTED #4 delivers a thrilling and fantastic ride. Williamson and Sudzuka have something special here: a book with an "out there" story that plays out incredibly grounded.
about 2 hours ago
The GoodThere have been a lot of little plot points that have either been unanswered or seemingly brushed aside and one of the biggest is what, exactly, Maximus’ device is actually for. That may have been the most burning, unanswered que...
The GoodThere have been a lot of little plot points that have either been unanswered or seemingly brushed aside and one of the biggest is what, exactly, Maximus’ device is actually for. That may have been the most burning, unanswered question in this series for me. Well, Jonathan Hickman has answered that question, and it’s one helluvan answer. We also get our first glance at Thane, the son of Thanos and one of the main reasons that Thanos decided to come to Earth after the Avengers left. While all this is going on, Thor is sent to negotiate the terms of surrender with the Builders, because when you think diplomat, you think the drunkest, rowdiest Avenger. So yes, there is definitely something else going on. The writing in this book remains absolutely top-notch, balancing great characterization with absolutely top-notch action. A complaint I’ve seen is that the characters aren’t really developing, but I’ve never thought an event like this is for “development” as much as it is “solidifying.” Despite the vast, far-reaching cast, every character is written as they should be and it’s especially great seeing Captain America’s mind used tactically from somewhere besides the front line. It’s like when creators remember that Spider-Man has a genius-level intellect or that Batman is an amazing detective: something not everyone does, but everyone should.Jerome Opeña and Dustin Weaver’s art is, as always, top-notch and with Justin Ponsor coloring both, the tone and styles meld to the point that I hardly noticed the shift. Maintaining pace and tone is absolutely critical for an issue and that is certainly the case here. But more than maintaining, the art is clean and eye-catching, when action occurs (which, again, is not terribly often), it has a bone-shaking impact, particularly as Black Bolt and Thanos square off, and the dialog scenes are well blocked, with the characters’ body language communicating as much as their words. Something that doesn’t often get praised enough are truly great backgrounds. It’s one of the most frequently cut corners, but that is never the case here and it gives every panel a great sense of place and context.The BadA very specific character’s fate is left very, very vague, seemingly intentionally so, but it also seems like a somewhat blatant misdirect. I could be wrong about this, and I actually hope I am, but it stuck out to me. We’re still not sure exactly WHY Thanos wants his son dead so badly as it seems to transcend his normal lust for killing. It’s fine that not everything has been explicitly spelled out, but even a hint or inkling would be nice.The VerdictInfinity remains an absolutely top-notch event book, one that’s easy to pick up on its own, but becomes richer the more side-titles you read. The core book stands perfectly, though, and should be an example to all future “event” books. This issue also retains a trend that I’ve very much enjoyed in that the tide begins to turn against the antagonist gradually, so the book’s finale seems less pulled from out of nowhere or reliant on a deus ex machina to snap its fingers and make everything okay again. The pacing is amazing, the plotlines are skillfully juggled, and the characters are riveting. Add to that the sharp, intense art and you’ve got one great issue of a spectacular event.
about 2 hours ago
Planet of the Apes magazine v1 #11, 1975 - Escorted by Alex and Jason, the Lawgiver returns to the city to quell the violence and re-establish peace. Mike Ploog also returns to the traditional pencil and ink approach, continuing the stor...
Planet of the Apes magazine v1 #11, 1975 - Escorted by Alex and Jason, the Lawgiver returns to the city to quell the violence and re-establish peace. Mike Ploog also returns to the traditional pencil and ink approach, continuing the storyline from issue #8. Although higher contrast, greytones nicely add dimension to characters and settings. Ploog's opening splash depicts a relatively quiet scene
about 2 hours ago
ComiXology continues to expand its reach into the French-speaking world with an intriguing new addition: Viz Media Europe and its French subsidiary Kazé. In North America, Viz has chosen to go it alone with its own self-contained manga a...
ComiXology continues to expand its reach into the French-speaking world with an intriguing new addition: Viz Media Europe and its French subsidiary Kazé. In North America, Viz has chosen to go it alone with its own self-contained manga app, available for iOS, Android, Kindle, Nook, Kobo and the web. In fact, although almost all major [...]
about 2 hours ago