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Huntsman Architectural Group have designed the Tolleson corporate offices in San Francisco, California. Description For Tolleson, a nationally recognized branding and creative agency, a relocation to 560 Pacific in San Francisco’s Bar...
Huntsman Architectural Group have designed the Tolleson corporate offices in San Francisco, California. Description For Tolleson, a nationally recognized branding and creative agency, a relocation to 560 Pacific in San Francisco’s Barbary Coast represents the third iteration of its studio evolution as well as partnership with Huntsman and Design Workshops.  Formerly the home and showroom for the Amtico flooring company, this two-story masonry and timber warehouse embodied many of the original office’s rustic characteristics such as exposed brick walls and wood trusses, wood floors, and skylights.   The building owner, Birmingham Development, specializes in the redevelopment of unique and historic properties in San Francisco and also served as the general contractor for this turnkey office delivery.  Working in tandem with Birmingham, Huntsman began to explore fitting Tolleson’s program into the 11,000 square foot upper floor while evaluating existing conditions to preserve, retrofit, and replace. Description continued after the gallery Description continued Coming from a 3,500 square foot space, Tolleson had the opportunity to configure its new office to better relate to how the firm currently works with its clients. This translated into a suite of spaces catering to client engagement, an expansion of the studio, and the addition of specialty functions such as video and audio editing and a photography studio. Huntsman planned the long, shoebox footprint of the building so the overall functionality maximizes space efficiency and circulation throughout. As visitors enter the building, they ascend to the second floor where reception and lounge await. At the helm of the office, a library, reading area, and lounge line the perimeter of the main conference room. Collaborating with Design Workshops, Huntsman designed the conference room to read as a floating volume within the warehouse space. Many of the features of the original office come into play here in the new location; the reception desk is made of hot rolled steel – a technique that defined the design direction of Tolleson’s first studio. Timber trusses and posts were bead-blasted to reflect the original redwood warmth and color. New steel beams form the edges of the room and define a contrast with the original construction. Reclaimed wood from former barns clad the sides of the room and extend up to a mezzanine level which was added as part of the building renovation. Four four-feet wide pivoting doors open the room to the surrounding space. Rippled glass panels hark back to the design elements of the first Tolleson office and provide both transparency and privacy. Flanked by the conference room on the South end, the studio lies behind and is centrally situated on the floor. On one side, open collaborative areas house flat files and a shared bar-height table for impromptu meetings. On the other side of the studio, a photo studio and editing room for video and audio media are easily in reach. Full height steel doors and wall panels clad the photo studio and editing room and make for additional pin-up space for designers. An opening in the ceiling allows natural light from rooftop monitors to permeate the two spines of circulation. A magnetic white board made of back-painted glass introduces new material technology and offers a neutral canvas for pinning up client work. New steel beams and posts remain exposed and define the outline of the studio. Mid-century icons like Eames’ LCW chairs nestle around a string of hand-dimpled copper lamps in the war room, where designers brainstorm client-confidential ideas. On the North end, a kitchen and break room anchor the other side of the studio. Natural and rustic materials help further articulate the restored warehouse aesthetic. Locally made tiles from Heath Ceramics and marble make up the backsplash of the kitchen wall. Design Workshops fabricated cabinetry that conveniently and elegantly hides kitche
about 2 hours ago
Just when we thought contemporary designers had done away with the overstuffed sofa for good, along comes Swell, the latest piece from Denmark’s Normann Copenhagen, with its pleasingly plump profile meant to reference a loaf of bre...
Just when we thought contemporary designers had done away with the overstuffed sofa for good, along comes Swell, the latest piece from Denmark’s Normann Copenhagen, with its pleasingly plump profile meant to reference a loaf of bread. A creation of Swedish designer Jonas Wagell, Swell’s exaggerated roundness is, in some ways, the antithesis of Moderism’s obsession with angular forms, and deliberately so. Says Wagell, ”I’ve always been fascinated by minimalism but I like to add a warm and personal touch to the products.” Our guess is that Modernists with an unspoken penchant for comfort will find Swell’s inviting cushioning not only warm, but refreshingly delicious. Images: Normann Copenhagen
about 2 hours ago
This L-shaped wooden house by Dutch studio Pasel Kuenzel Architects sits at the water's edge on an artificial island in Amsterdam. (more...)
This L-shaped wooden house by Dutch studio Pasel Kuenzel Architects sits at the water's edge on an artificial island in Amsterdam. (more...)
about 2 hours ago
Andy Ramus and Laurent Metrich of AR Design Studio have completed an extension to a 1950′s three bedroom house in Hampshire, United Kingdom. Description Commissioned by two Winchester based Doctors; The Medic’s House is the...
Andy Ramus and Laurent Metrich of AR Design Studio have completed an extension to a 1950′s three bedroom house in Hampshire, United Kingdom. Description Commissioned by two Winchester based Doctors; The Medic’s House is the latest extension project by AR Design Studio. Upon the arrival of their new baby daughter, the need for additional family space meant that the client’s existing 1950s three bed house desperately needed extending. The brief called for two additional bedrooms upstairs and a large open-plan family space with light, views and access to the beautiful garden at ground floor. AR Design Studio’s solution was to create a large charcoal grey living box at ground level with a full height glazed opening elevation to the garden. A timber clad sleeping pod is perched above at first floor level providing the additional bedrooms. At ground floor level the extension contains a utility, WC, kitchen, dining room and lounge area, fitted with 3 large eco-friendly sliding glass panels creating an uninterrupted view of the garden. The flush threshold and continuous floor surface enhance this connection with the garden by allowing the internal space to flow seamlessly out into it on warmer days. The walls are constructed from super insulated block and oversized insulated cavities ensuring a very thermally efficient envelope. Large opaque glass panels to the sides allow etch light to enter deep into the plan of the space. The structure is hidden in strategically placed fins that suggest living zones within the open-plan space. Upstairs, the western red cedar clad addition consists of a generous master suite with a separate dressing area and one other additional bedroom. This upper box is also fabricated in timber, allowing for a light weight structure that reduces the need for unsightly columns beneath. The construction contains over 250mm of insulation which AR felt was important at the upper level. This approach to construction was also carried through into the over insulated single-ply roof. The fenestration was resolved as a series of verticals that celebrate the depth of the walls with a combination of recessed and flush frameless windows. The overall composition was influenced by the ancient Greek theory of the ‘Golden Section’ in order to provide a well-balanced and proportioned rear elevation. Design: AR Design Studio Photography: Martin Gardner
about 3 hours ago
Working with local contractor Wind and Water House, the always original Vo Trong Nghia Architects have just completed an elegant cafe of bamboo in Kontum, Vietnam. The cafe is part of a hotel complex, offering a relaxing change of pace ...
Working with local contractor Wind and Water House, the always original Vo Trong Nghia Architects have just completed an elegant cafe of bamboo in Kontum, Vietnam. The cafe is part of a hotel complex, offering a relaxing change of pace for hotel guests by creating the feeling of a bamboo forest shelter. Siting in the open air cafe, visitors enjoy the nearby view across the water towards the mountains. Sited on a shallow artificial lake near Dakbla River in Kontum City, it is designed to offer a semi-outdoor banquet hall for wedding ceremonies. The construction is determined by the material characteristics of bamboo. Unlike timber or steel buildings, bamboo construction cannot be nailed. To achieve the consistency and accuracy needed,  the columns were prefabricated offsite before their erection in a unique construction. But traditional treatment methods were also used by soaking the bamboo in mud to pretreat it, and using low-tech joint ratten-tying bamboo construction. The roof was supported by the 15 bamboo columns, creating an open structure which maximises the wind flow into the building during the summer, while resisting harsh winds during the stormy season. The challenge of the project was to create a distinctive space unique to the unique characteristics of bamboo. This the 4th work we’ve covered from the talented and imaginative Vo Trong Nghia Architects, after a slick white square house with a breathable green wall, and a bamboo and steel girders house for slum dwellers. This is a post from Home Design FindUnique Prefabricated Bamboo Cafe from Vo Trong Nghia Architects
about 3 hours ago
If by yes
If by yes
about 3 hours ago
Why we turn off our cell phones during takeoff
Why we turn off our cell phones during takeoff
about 3 hours ago
Thank God
Thank God
about 3 hours ago
Victor Papanek
Victor Papanek
about 3 hours ago
Materials: Faktum, Trofast Description: After searching for a neat shoe-rack months we finally decided that IKEA is not able to provide what we want. Since our whole flat looks like a IKEA showroom and we are convinced with the cost-bene...
Materials: Faktum, Trofast Description: After searching for a neat shoe-rack months we finally decided that IKEA is not able to provide what we want. Since our whole flat looks like a IKEA showroom and we are convinced with the cost-benefit ratio we thought of giving the horizontal Faktum cabinets a try. Not only these three cabinets provide plenty of space for our shoes. We also added some hooks under the countertop to hang our jackets. Under the bottommost Faktum we furthermore added some aluminium profiles, so we can attach 2 Trofast Boxes for gloves and scarfs. Of course the lowest door is custom painted to match the room (not visible in photo). Have fun! ~ Markus, Austria
about 3 hours ago