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Windows Phone 8 device displays might soon reach previously unheard of sizes if a report published today holds any water.Over at the Windows SuperSite Paul Thurrott shared some scoops, including word that the expected Windows Phone 8.1 &...
Windows Phone 8 device displays might soon reach previously unheard of sizes if a report published today holds any water.Over at the Windows SuperSite Paul Thurrott shared some scoops, including word that the expected Windows Phone 8.1 "Blue" update could add support for devices with displays up to 10 inches large.We already heard that the GDR3 Windows Phone update might add support for 5- to 6-inch devices, but it seems the update after that - the Windows Phone 8.1 release, code named "Blue" - might push that even farther.Although "this obviously infringes on Windows RT/8.x tablets," as Thurrott put it, "so it's not clear what the thinking is there."This town's not big enoughWill WIndows RT and Windows Phone 8 eventually merge?Can Microsoft possibly maintain and explain three very different operating systems that are all on devices of the same size?Windows 8 and Windows RT are already doing battle over the 10-inch Surface tablet. What will be left standing if Windows Phone 8 tablets of the same size join the fray?Microsoft may want to think twice before potentially cannibalizing itself any further, though it would behoove us to keep in mind that this is nothing more than an unsubstantiated rumor at this point - and one that doesn't necessarily make sense, anyway."Back" to the futureThe same report highlights some other potential features of WP 8.1, like increased API compatibility between Windows Phone and Windows RT - which actually supports the idea that they could someday merge.In addition, Windows Phone will reportedly become less Android and more iOS with the substantial update when Microsoft axes the "back" navigation button from hardware specifications because it "just doesn't make sense."Finally, multitasking will reportedly improve and become more efficient with Windows Phone 8.1.Will Windows Phone ever match the success of iOS and Android? Microsoft says it's key to the company's transformation.
about 4 hours ago
Google's original Nexus 7 tablet blew the bottom end of the tablet market wide open last year with top specs and a low price, but how does it stack up against its leaner, meaner brother of the same name?Rather confusingly we're going to ...
Google's original Nexus 7 tablet blew the bottom end of the tablet market wide open last year with top specs and a low price, but how does it stack up against its leaner, meaner brother of the same name?Rather confusingly we're going to have to refer to the two tablets by the year they were made, as they both sport the Nexus 7 name - no "Nexus 7 2" here, but that's a minor blot on what are a couple of impressive devices.There's no surprise that the new Nexus 7 (2013, date fans) has a better spec sheet than its predecessor, but we're going to take a detailed look at how the two compare.The reviews: Nexus 7 (2012) | New Nexus 7DesignThe first thing you'll notice between the two is the design. While both obviously have the same size 7-inch display, Google (well actually Asus, the firm behind the creation of both tablets) has fine-tuned the body of its latest offering.Measuring 114 x 200 x 8.65 mm the new Nexus 7 (2013) is actually fractionally taller than the original (although only by 1.5mm), but it's got noticeably thinner in width and depth making it just that little bit easier to hold with one hand.The one handed operation is further aided by a drop in weight for the Nexus 7, down from 340g to a delicate 290g on the new version - making it considerably lighter than the Amazon Kindle Fire HD (395g), Nook HD (315g) and the larger, yet thinner iPad mini (308g).Couple that size and weight with a fully rubberised rear and the new Nexus 7 (2013) is just as easy, if not easier, to handle than its predecessor, while still maintaining a solid build - although neither ooze the same premium finish as Apple's smaller tablet.We're treated to stereo speakers on the rear of the new Nexus 7, with a strip of speaker holes running across the top of the tablet, and a broken strip towards the base - broken by the bump for the microUSB port.Gone is the four-pin dock connector found on the bottom left side of the old Nexus 7, replaced by exactly nothing on the newer version, while the headphone jack has been shifted from the base to the top of the tablet.DisplayThe new Nexus 7 seriously steps things up in the display department, boasting a stunning 7-inch, full HD display which sports an eye-popping 1920 x 1200 resolution and 323ppi pixel density - compare that to the 1280 x 800, 216ppi original Nexus 7 and you get why it's such a step up.Both the Nexus 7 (2013) and Nexus 7 (2012) use the same LED-backlit IPS LCD screen technology, and while colours don't pop as they do on the Super AMOLED displays we get on some smartphones, the quality is still top notch.Put the two tablets side by side and the new Nexus 7 clearly has the beating of its predecessor in real life as well as on paper, with sharper, brighter images and crystal clear video playback. Beautiful.Operating SystemOperating system is less of a close run thing as both tablets now run the latest version of Google's platform - Android 4.3 Jelly Bean.The new Nexus 7 launched running Android 4.3, while the 2012 version kicked things off with Android 4.1, although it has subsequently been updated to 4.2, and most recently 4.3.This means that both the new and old Nexus 7 tablets offer up the same functionality and features, although the inclusion of a rear facing camera on the new Nexus 7 obviously offers something additional.As these are both Google's own-brand products we'd expect the tablets to be hastily upgraded to Android 4.4 KitKat, which is rumoured to launch in mid October.PowerThe original Nexus 7 was certainly no slouch with a 1.2GHz quad-core processor and 1GB RAM, but once again the new Nexus 7 ups the ante with 1.5GHz quad-core chip and 2GB of RAM.This means the already smooth running Jelly Bean runs even more effortlessly on the new Nexus 7 (2013) - you're rarely ever left waiting for anything to load.That's not to say the old Nexus 7 (2012) offers up a poor user experience - far from it in fact - it's just that its younger brother is even better.CameraThe new Nexus 7 comes
about 7 hours ago
Financial giant NASDAX OMX has transformed from a "semi-regulatory utility" into a forward-thinking, for-profit exchange, thanks to Dell's infrastructure solutions. With supercomputers that can process more than a million message...
Financial giant NASDAX OMX has transformed from a "semi-regulatory utility" into a forward-thinking, for-profit exchange, thanks to Dell's infrastructure solutions. With supercomputers that can process more than a million messages per second, NASDAQ OMX enables today's lightning-fast pace of trading. "Being part of an exchange means being part of the heartbeat of an economy," says Anna Ewing, EVP and CIO, NASDAQ OMX. "It also means being part of market events from a macroeconomic perspective. It is very exciting and continually keeps you on your toes."But things weren't always so efficient. Not so many years ago, NASDAQ was a US-based equities market looking to go global. When Ewing took on the role of CIO at NASDAQ 11 years ago, she was brought in as part of the firm's transformation. "Back then we were a single US equities market and part of our transformation was to move from what we were then - in essence a semi-regulatory utility - to a for-profit exchange that was really now operating in a very competitive landscape," she says.YouTube : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54YitIZTtxsWhen NASDAQ acquired OMX in 2008, the firm became the world's leading provider of exchange technology.The exchange's for-profit environment needs to operate in a highly competitive landscape around the world. As the company started to transform, it partnered with Dell, gaining the right technology to power work behind the scenes. By combining IT solutions and business knowledge, Dell and Intel's platform enables the exchange to continually innovate. Speed is a competitive differentiator in trading, so it was integral that Dell's infrastructure matched NASDAQ OMX's high expectations. "We will process up to a million messages per second on any given day," Ewing says. "The ability to have a marketplace that is fast moving is really important to our customers."Today, NASDAQ OMX technology is running in 70 markets and 50 countries. "Technology is core to everything that we do," says Ewing. "We have been using technology to really change what it means to be an exchange."Storage and networkingIn addition, storage solutions from Dell help secure NASDAQ OMX's position as the leading provider of exchange technology. Dell's storage and networking solutions securely power the exchange, allowing NASDAQ OMX to disseminate trading information without skipping a beat."Anna Ewing and her team at OMX have the biggest challenge in the world," says Ken Gazda, Global Account Manager at Dell. "They need to make sure that they are the fastest, and the best in the market."And with Dell's solutions in place, NASDAQ can do what it does best; using technology to transform the market. Ewing says: "We are certainly very confident about the platform we have in place, but you need to continually innovate - you don't stop."
about 9 hours ago
We've got more rumoured info on the Nexus 5 – which means that now you should wonder what don't we know about the forthcoming Google superphone.Well, there are a couple of new tidbits of just-surfaced info which we weren't aware of, conc...
We've got more rumoured info on the Nexus 5 – which means that now you should wonder what don't we know about the forthcoming Google superphone.Well, there are a couple of new tidbits of just-surfaced info which we weren't aware of, concerning the differences between the two versions of the handset.According to a source speaking to PhoneArena, each variation will be powered by a different capacity battery.The 16GB Nexus 5 will allegedly have a 2,300mAh battery while the 32GB will pack a 3,000mAh variant. Oddly however, the leaked LG Nexus 5 manual we spotted the other day claimed the 32GB model has a 2,300mAh battery - the opposite of what we're hearing now.The price is rightThe same source also reports the prices of the models. Apparently the 16GB will be priced at $299 (around £186, AU$315) and the 32GB will cost $349 (around £217, AU £368).A 3,000mAh 32GB model will certainly go down better with buyers, but it's just a shame that we won't be getting that 64GB variant we so wanted. Then again, this could be nonsense, so remain open-minded for now. The Nexus 5 is expected to touch down this month and be the first device running Android 4.4 KitKat, which is going to excite those looking for the best vanilla Google experience.
1 day ago
Can we call it a Raspevolution yet? The UK (the Sony-owned Pencoed factory in South Wales, to be precise), has baked its one millionth Raspberry Pi.Announcing the figure in a blog post on its company website, the Raspberry Pi Foundation ...
Can we call it a Raspevolution yet? The UK (the Sony-owned Pencoed factory in South Wales, to be precise), has baked its one millionth Raspberry Pi.Announcing the figure in a blog post on its company website, the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that a total of 1.75 million of the diminutive computers have been built to date.Three quarters of a million were made in China, where the first Raspberry Pis were made back in 2011 before production was moved to the UK in September 2012.Golden touchAnd if you're wondering what's happened to the millionth Raspberry Pi made in the UK, it's been housed inside a gold-plated case and locked away in the Raspberry Pi Foundation's headquarters. Hands off, in other words.The Raspberry Pi, which costs between £25 and £32, is a highly customisable motherboard that can function as a fully-fledged PC.It's primarily used to help teach coding in schools, but the device has also been used by enthusiasts for anything from watching TV to browsing the web, running ZX Spectrum emulators and even controlling robots.But are there any business benefits when it comes to the Raspberry Pi?
1 day ago
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has used his last letter to shareholders to provide a glimpse into how the company is making its transition from a "software and services" to a "devices and services" company.Though the process...
Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has used his last letter to shareholders to provide a glimpse into how the company is making its transition from a "software and services" to a "devices and services" company.Though the process is in "early days", Ballmer writes that it's centred around structural changes to the organisation, which are based around a "deceptively simple but profoundly powerful key change".He writes: "Instead of organizing our teams around individual products, we've organised by function, including, for example, engineering, sales, marketing and finance. It ensures we have one strategy and work as one team with one set of shared goals."Smart buyBallmer also described Microsoft's acquisition of Nokia's Devices and Services business as a "signature event" in the company's transformation, and that it will "accelerate our growth with Windows Phone while strengthening our overall device ecosystem and our opportunity".Other of the company's products and services given a nod include Windows 8.1, Surface 2, Xbox One and enterprise services such as Windows Server, Azure, Dynamics and Office 365, which Microsoft's larger-than-life CEO cited as further causes for optimism.A recent SEC filing revealed that Ballmer's bonus was shrunk 11% during the company's 2013 fiscal year in light of a poor performance from its Windows Division. Unsurprisingly, Ballmer focused on the positive in his letter, pointing out that Microsoft grew revenue 6% over that period and returned 15% to shareholders (of which he is one of) through dividends and stock repurchases.Hear that? Power duo Gates and Ballmer seek re-election to Microsoft's board
1 day ago
Three of Microsoft's highest-profile investors have reportedly called for Bill Gates to step down from the company's board, but the software giant's co-founder and chairman is not planning on going quietly.That's according to Microsoft's...
Three of Microsoft's highest-profile investors have reportedly called for Bill Gates to step down from the company's board, but the software giant's co-founder and chairman is not planning on going quietly.That's according to Microsoft's annual proxy filing with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which shows that Gates, along with the company's current CEO Steve Ballmer, are standing for re-election to its board of directors on November 19.The move is likely to further sour relations with investors who told Reuters that Gates, who has served as chairman of Microsoft's board since 1981, is too influential within the company and could limit a new CEO from adopting new strategies and making substantial changes.Bonus bounceBallmer, who joined Microsoft's board of directors over a decade ago when he was given the job of CEO, recently announced that he would be giving up the top job in August 2014 before making a teary and emotional farewell speech.The SEC filing reveals that his bonus was shrunk 11% to $620,000 (around, £386,000, or AU$1 million) for Microsoft's fiscal 2013 in light of an 18% decline in Windows Division operating income that was dragged down by a $900 million inventory writedown on Surface tablets.Microsoft is yet to name his successor. If Gates and Ballmer (who is the company's second-largest individual shareholder with a 4% stake) are re-elected, the pair would wield substantial influence over who would replace one of the industry's most big, brash and bullish figures in recent times.Here are six candidates that could replace Microsoft's larger-than-life CEO
2 days ago
Welcome to the latest edition of MSI motherboards monthly. Yup, the MSI Z87-GD65 is one of no fewer than three MSI efforts on test this issue. A bit OTT? Perhaps, but all three are very different propositions. In fact, as a trio they han...
Welcome to the latest edition of MSI motherboards monthly. Yup, the MSI Z87-GD65 is one of no fewer than three MSI efforts on test this issue. A bit OTT? Perhaps, but all three are very different propositions. In fact, as a trio they handily capture the key choices you must make when buying a mobo. At one end of the scale there's the apparently poverty-stricken Z87-G43 and its sub-£100 sticker. At the other, the XPower implodes any notions of value for money at £350. Thus at £160 the MSI Z87-GD65 represents the Tony Blair option. No, not a motherboard with an incongruous perma-tan, bizarre mid-Atlantic twang and a faint whiff of war crime. That would be silly, albeit a pretty impressive effort from what is an inanimate object. No, what we're talking about is a third way. Not ultra cheap, not ultra expensive, but pragmatically somewhere in between and with a gaming focused twist that ought to be right up our collective alley. Call me Tony Unsurprisingly, it's a bit of a mishmash. The back panel feels pretty budget and there are only six USB ports in total (four of them USB 3.0). DisplayPort is also a conspicuous absentee. On the other hand, you get both AMD Crossfire and Nvidia SLI support, which is probably a must for any board that's pitching itself as a gaming platform. You also get a grand total of eight SATA ports, all 6Gbps, though two of them are driven by a discrete chip, the rest are from the Z87 chipset. More specifically gaming relevant are the Killer E2200 network adapter for low latency and a PS/2 port with a 1,000Hz poll rate for maximum response. Nice if you use PS2 peripherals, which only the hardest of hardcore do these days. Anyway, it's debatable how much benefit these features bring, but MSI deserves kudos for the effort. The same goes for the V-check points. It's the sort of thing that only very serious overclockers are going to care about, and yet it's still fun to have such a cutting-edge feature. You also get hardware power and reset buttons, LED debug, a quick switch for toggling between two BIOS images, MSI's OC Genie button for idiot-proof overclocking and EMI shielding for audio. The components generally look slick. There's heat pipe cooling and a general air of pricey premiumness. At which point you're probably thinking what we are: the XPower doesn't offer much more that we care about. Suddenly, £160 is looking like a very nice deal. BenchmarksMulti-thread CPU performanceCinebench 11.5: Index score: Higher is betterASRock Z87 Extreme3: 8.03Asus Sabertooth Z87: 8.34Asus Z87-Pro: 8.05Gigabyte Z87-D3HP: 8.06Gigabyte Z87 G1.Sniper M5: 8.05Intel DZ87KLT-75K: 8.11MSI Z87-G43: 8.5MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming: 8.48MSI Z87 XPower: 8.5Single-thread CPU performanceCinebench 11.5: Index score: Higher is betterASRock Z87 Extreme3: 1.75Asus Sabertooth Z87: 1.75Asus Z87-Pro: 1.76Gigabyte Z87-D3HP: 1.75Gigabyte Z87 G1.Sniper M5: 1.72Intel DZ87KLT-75K: 1.77MSI Z87-G43: 1.72MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming: 1.71MSI Z87 XPower: 1.72Video encode performanceX264 4.0: Frames per second: Higher is betterASRock Z87 Extreme3: 45.5Asus Sabertooth Z87: 46.3Asus Z87-Pro: 45.6Gigabyte Z87-D3HP: 45.5Gigabyte Z87 G1.Sniper M5: 45.5Intel DZ87KLT-75K: 45.7MSI Z87-G43: 45.7MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming: 46.5MSI Z87 XPower: 47.5Memory bandwidth @ optimised defultsSiSoft Sandra: Gigabytes per second: Higher is betterASRock Z87 Extreme3: 17.38Asus Sabertooth Z87: 17.24Asus Z87-Pro: 17.47Gigabyte Z87-D3HP: 17.25Gigabyte Z87 G1.Sniper M5: 17.45Intel DZ87KLT-75K: 17.56MSI Z87-G43: 17.32MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming: 17.2MSI Z87 XPower: 17.39Gaming performanceShogun: Total War 2: Frames per second: Higher is betterASRock Z87 Extreme3: 38.4Asus Sabertooth Z87: 39.4Asus Z87-Pro: 38.1Gigabyte Z87-D3HP: 34.5Gigabyte Z87 G1.Sniper M5: 37.1Intel DZ87KLT-75K: 37.9MSI Z87-G43: 44.6MSI Z87-GD65 Gaming: 38.9MSI Z87 XPower: 39.5Maximum overclock performance4770K: Gigahertz: Higher is betterASRock Z87 Extreme3: 4.7Asus Sabertooth Z87: 4.7Asus Z87-Pro: 4.7Gigabyte Z87-D3HP: 4.0Gigabyte Z87 G1
3 days ago
Samsung has officially announced the Galaxy Ace 3 release date for the UK, with the phone available from 5 October. The Android Jellybean 4.2 phone falls in the lower mid-range market and can boast 4G connectivity - which is a boon in th...
Samsung has officially announced the Galaxy Ace 3 release date for the UK, with the phone available from 5 October. The Android Jellybean 4.2 phone falls in the lower mid-range market and can boast 4G connectivity - which is a boon in these superfast days. You can count on Samsung's Android sheen plus features from the larger Galaxy S flagship phones - which includes features like the S Translator, S Travel, S Voice, Easy Mode and Smart Stay. ShenanigansGiven that this is likely to be an attractive proposition for the younger market, the camera is an, ahem, focus, and the Ace 3 brings a 5MP snapper for capturing all those high jinx and/or shenanigans. Screenwise, the Ace 3 packs a 4 inch display but you might want to consider if the 8GB of storage is enough for your needs (especially given that not all of that will be available to you) as you'll probably be looking at investing in an SD card to boost your capacity. The Galaxy Ace will be landing first at EE stores and then dealing itself into the likes of Tesco and Carphone Warehouse. Want something a little bigger (and costlier) without losing the number 3? How about checking out the Samsung Galaxy Note 3
5 days ago
Despite having partnered with Asus for both this and last years Nexus 7, it looks like Google might ditch Asus for next years 7-inch slate.This latest rumour comes courtesy of Digitimes, which claims that Asus is trying to expand its sha...
Despite having partnered with Asus for both this and last years Nexus 7, it looks like Google might ditch Asus for next years 7-inch slate.This latest rumour comes courtesy of Digitimes, which claims that Asus is trying to expand its share in the tablet market to make up for potentially losing the Nexus 7 contract.There's no denying that Asus is putting a lot of effort into its tablet business above and beyond the Nexus 7, with numerous devices released or on their way this year, such as the Asus Transformer Pad, MeMO Pad HD 7 and the PadFone Infinity. Still, Digitimes doesn't reveal what rumours it's referring to, so it's worth taking this with a pinch of salt for now.Life's good for LGBack in July analyst Ming-Chi-Kuo claimed that next year's Nexus 7 might be handed over to LG so that Google could leverage the company's display technology, so it could be this which Digitimes is referencing.If it does find itself in the hands of LG, the 2014 model of the Nexus 7 could look quite different to the two we've had so far.Don't feel too bad for Asus though, as we've previously heard that the Taiwanese firm may take the reigns of the Nexus 10 from Samsung.We were rather fond of this year's Asus led Nexus 7. Read all about it in our full review.
6 days ago