Dionne Warwick

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On Kenny Garret‘s third album for Mack Avenue Records he explores many terrains. He uses two different pianists in Vernell Brown and Benito Gonzalez, bassist Corcoran Holt, drummers Marcus Baylor, McClenty Hunter, and Mark Whitfiel...
On Kenny Garret‘s third album for Mack Avenue Records he explores many terrains. He uses two different pianists in Vernell Brown and Benito Gonzalez, bassist Corcoran Holt, drummers Marcus Baylor, McClenty Hunter, and Mark Whitfield, Jr., as well as a string quartet on “Brother Brown” (on which Garrett appropriately takes over on piano.) All but one of these 12 tunes offer sophisticated evidence of his own journey through the jazz lineage and his pushing at the margins of post-bop. There is a deep reliance on melody and singing through his horns, even when things get musically complex as they do on the title track in which he explores modal and Eastern musical terrains on his soprano. Quotes from Coltrane’s “My Favorite Things” are in his solo, but so… 320 kbps | 164 MB | UL | TB | MC …are moments of Eastern harmony, underscored by Brown’s fat chords, wrangling arpeggios, and open-framed statements. There are also a pair of throaty vocal chants by him and the pianist — his own Christian, the latter Buddhist — commingling seamlessly to directly point at the spiritual nature inside the tune. Several other numbers offer overt nods to his forebears, collaborators, and influences. “Hey, Chick,” with its Moorish-cum-flamenco vibe, evokes themes that Chick Corea explored potently on My Spanish Heart. “Chucho’s Mambo,” with its rumbero and son vibe, is a direct nod to pianist Chucho Valdes and also features trumpeter Ravi Best and percussionist Rudy Bird (in one of several appearances). “J’Ouvert” is subtitled “Homage to Sonny Rollins” and takes its cue from the saxophone colossus’ use of calypso rhythms, cadences, and lyric themes. “A Side Order of Hijiki” doesn’t refer to the Japanese culinary seaweed of its title, but the manner of his own playing as described by the late Mulgrew Miller. It is a driving post-bop jam, with sharp ostinatos by Gonzalez and a thrumming, furious bassline by Holt. A noticeable surprise is the inclusion of Burt Bacharach’s and Hal David’s “I Say a Little Prayer for You,” with a subtle Latin framework that otherwise follows the arrangement written for Dionne Warwick. This is Garrett at his most songlike, and his most direct attempt on the album at communicating melodically; as in the past, it also reveals the deep, early influence of Junior Walker on his playing. Pushing the World Away is a wildly diverse offering for Garrett. What it doesn’t reveal in swing it does in intricacies, shadows, impressive arrangements, and striking musicianship.
about 4 hours ago
Ah, Stasha, how I've missed you and the lovely Monday Listicles! So this week while I'm cooking up new projects for workshops that cannot be shared quite yet, I thought I'd pop over and see what the Listicles are up to...and it's a list ...
Ah, Stasha, how I've missed you and the lovely Monday Listicles! So this week while I'm cooking up new projects for workshops that cannot be shared quite yet, I thought I'd pop over and see what the Listicles are up to...and it's a list of ten favorite songs from my senior year in high school. This I can do...a little musical procrastination walk down memory lane never hurt anyone! I tend to be a little all over the place in musical taste. I listened to my fair share of everything from country to Nirvana, but I {heart} happy music, and I like to sing along...ahem...loudly. If I had a nickle for every time the boys asked me to stop singing...well, whatever, they will appreciate my vocal talents someday, right? And in my defense I was just 17, and you know what I mean. Rock on, baby!Yep, total band geek! I'm second from the left in the front row. Go, Wildcats!My Top 10 Making-a-Radio-Mix-Tape from Senior Year of High School1. Life Is a Highway by Tom Cochrane Loved it the moment I heard it. Now known as the Cars song in my household, eliciting squeals and requests for the movie every time the boys hear it. At least they let me listen to it, instead of Eric Herman.2. Too Funky by George Michael Anything. George. Michael. Is. Awesome.3. Friday I'm in Love by the Cure He's wearing more eye makeup in this video than I've worn in my life...all together...still love it!4. Everything About You by Ugly Kidd Joe John despises this song...you could say he hates everything about it...which requires loud sing-a-longs, dontcha think?5. Baby, Baby by Amy Grant I wanted her hair so badly!6. Tom's Diner by Suzanne Vega/DNA You are totally humming right now, aren't you? I am...7. Groove is in the Heart by Dee-light Remember when MTV had videos? 8. Move This by Technotronic so I don't dance, like almost never, especially in high school. Except secretly...in my room..to this song. 9. Tennessee by Arrested Development I've never been to Tennessee. It's not a chipper song. Still you gotta belt it out, right?10. I Feel Lucky by Mary Chapin Carpenter Country is big where I went to HS, so there was a lot of Randy Travis, Judds, Garth Brooks, etc... I disown any knowledge of Billy Ray though.Bonus That's What Friends Are For by Dionne Warwick & co...it was our graduation song. 'Nuff said!
about 13 hours ago
For the second straight year, one of the fall movie season's Oscar contenders will be a film dealing with slavery. Steve McQueen's fact-based Twelve Years a Slave promises to be a more serious if not more popular treatment of the subject...
For the second straight year, one of the fall movie season's Oscar contenders will be a film dealing with slavery. Steve McQueen's fact-based Twelve Years a Slave promises to be a more serious if not more popular treatment of the subject than Quentin Tarantino's somewhat-unlikely crowd-pleaser Django Unchained, and it comes out of the film-festival circuit highly touted as one of 2013's best American films. In anticipation of the McQueen film's general release, let's return to the world of slavesploitation. Ken Norton's death last month put us in mind of his iconic performances in Mandingo and Drum, and exploitative films like those had an obvious influence on Tarantino, though probably not on McQueen. Herbert J. Biberman's Slaves will probably come closer to the McQueen film in spirit, but you can see the family resemblance to Django Unchained as well. No more than a thin, dimly discerned line separates slavesploitation from films and filmmakers that would shun the label. The subject matter touches too many nerves that, if not raw, are still tender. Part of the problem is that films about slavery tend to be about the corruption of masters as much as the they're about the oppression of slaves. The two threads are arguably inseparable, but combine them and you risk compromising a dignity on the part of the victims that some audiences (or critics) insist upon. The subject threatens to shift to the corruption of slaves as an inevitable consequence of the intimacy of plantation slavery. Any slavery film is a tightrope act and some people will never be satisfied, perhaps believing that American slavery is a subject, like the Holocaust, that can only be trivialized by fiction film.Herbert J. Biberman was a relatively minor figure in Hollywood who looms larger now as one of the legendary Hollywood Ten, the writers and directors who went to prison for refusing to testify on their involvement with Communism to the House Un-American Activities Committee. As a creator, Biberman is best known now, if known at all, for directing the 1954 film Salt of the Earth, a union-financed drama made with talent (including the actor Will "Grandpa Walton" Geer) that had been blacklisted by Hollywood. Slaves was Biberman's first picture since then, and his last; the director and co-writer would die in 1971. Co-written by Biberman with two other scribes, the film riffs on some of the tropes long associated with Uncle Tom's Cabin while doing without the more cloying elements (Little Eva, etc.) of the Stowe novel. Biberman's Uncle Tom surrogate is Luke (Ossie Davis), a trusted horse trainer and horse trader on a Kentucky plantation. We meet him returning from a trip to Ohio -- free soil -- where he conducted business for his benevolent owner. The master's trust is rewarded, while Luke's fellow chattels are astounded, by his refusal to take advantage of the opportunity to run away. Luke is a good Christian who respects the scriptural injunction on slaves to obey their masters. More practically, he's slowly earning money to buy his freedom, with an eye on making good money in the North to buy freedom for his wife and children. Luke's master supports this aspiration, but has proved fiscally irresponsible. Unable to pay his debt to a slave trader (David Huddleston), the master is forced to give up several slaves to the trader, including Luke and the more mischievous Jericho (Robert Kya-Hill). This is the first of several disillusioning moments for Luke, but there is worse to come.Luke and Jericho are put on the market and made to prove their health by jumping up and down (see above) before being purchased by this film's Simon Legree, Nathan MacKay (Stephen "Messala" Boyd). Hailing from New England Puritan stock, Nathan has been captain of a slave ship, dealing with African chiefs who readily sold their own people to him. He collects African art along with Africans, and commissions African inspired fashions for his slave mistress Cassie (Dionne Warwick). MacKay
6 days ago
Clockwise: Dusty Springfield, Dionne Warwick, Etta James, and Barbra Streisand. While trying to find an inspiration for tonight's post, I kept coming back to the 1960s, and I wasn't sure what to do about that. And then I finally st...
Clockwise: Dusty Springfield, Dionne Warwick, Etta James, and Barbra Streisand. While trying to find an inspiration for tonight's post, I kept coming back to the 1960s, and I wasn't sure what to do about that. And then I finally stepped out of my own way, and decided to take a look at some of the songs released in the Sixties, and knew I was on to something. There were some magnificent ladies making music back then, some who would truly make a memorable impact on music for a long time to come. That would include a beautiful Brit whose voice could sound bright and lovely, or tinged with a bit of darkness. I like the muskiness she brings to her 1965 single, "Some of Your Lovin'". She brought a soulful quality to her Pop, which I found to be irresistible. Please enjoy Dusty Springfield singing "Some of Your Lovin'". There was some sort of amazing chemical reaction when Burt Bacharach and Hal David worked with a young Dionne Warwick. For much of the decade, they seemed unstoppable, with hit after hit. It began in 1962 with "Don't Make Me Over", Dionne's first single and first hit. The song went to #21 on the Billboard Hot 100, an impressive start to any career. I, however, will focus on the third hit single featuring the words and music of Bacharach/David, the highest charting so far at #6 on the Billboard Hot 100. The heartbreaking "Walk On By" tackles the aftermath of love gone wrong. Few could serve it up quite like Dionne. Here is Dionne Warwick with her 1964 hit, "Walk On By". In 1967, a young Barbra Streisand was on the brink of superstardom. She already had success on Broadway, with two Tony Award nominations, including for her 1964 performance as Fanny Brice in Funny Girl. She had hit records, and earned four Grammy Awards, including two for her 1963 debut, 'The Barbra Streisand Album'. She had begun working on the movie version of 'Funny Girl', for which she will win the Academy Award. And there was a special event, a free concert in Central Park that was being recorded for Broadcast on network television. She song songs off several of her albums, including the first. Here is Barbra singing the classic "Cry Me A River", with that special spin. She was in great voice, and the audience definitely fell in love. Finally, I thought I would go with a singer whose voice is as explosive as her personality. Etta James was huge in the 1960s, charting with song after song. Her blend of Pop, Soul and Blues set her apart from the rest. She had many big hits, like "I'd Rather Go Blind", "Sunday Kind of Love", and, of course, "At Last". Her voice was so distinctive, rich and expressive. I picked one of my favorites, even if it wasn't a song that scored well on the charts. In 1966, Etta released "Only Time Will Tell", a song written by Maurice McAlister and Terry Vail. Heartbreaking from start to finish, there was no mistaking the Blues in this one. I hope you love Etta James singing "Only Time Will Tell"! Have a great weekend!
11 days ago
We were just talking about holiday shows in NYC in celebration of Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas, but before we get there, there's a ton of stuff to do for Halloween as well. Like they've done in the past, Cypress Hill will play...
We were just talking about holiday shows in NYC in celebration of Thanksgiving, Hanukkah and Christmas, but before we get there, there's a ton of stuff to do for Halloween as well. Like they've done in the past, Cypress Hill will play a show around then at Best Buy Theater on October 30 with Method Man collaborator Redman. Tickets for that show are on sale now. Zappa Plays Zappa (aka the band led by Frank Zappa's son Dweezil performing his father's music) are playing a Halloween eve show at Gramercy Theatre (10/30) and then on Halloween they play Beacon Theatre (10/31). Tickets for those shows are on sale now. As discussed, Crystal Stilts, who just opened for Deerhunter, are playing a Halloween show at Bowery Ballroom. Since we last spoke, it's been announced that the show will be opened by Excepter and Zachary Cale. Tickets for that show are on sale now. The band that currently tours as The Misfits are celebrating in NYC the night before Halloween at BB King's (10/30) with The Attack (tickets), then after Halloween (aka the Day of the Dead), they play NJ's Starland Ballroom (11/1) (tickets). Meanwhile, original Misfits vocalist Glenn Danzig and his former bandmate Doyle are going on a tour together that hits NYC on October 18 at Roseland Ballroom. Tickets for that show are still available. Another punk option on Halloween is Cali vets The Dickies' previously discussed show at Knitting Factory (10/31). Tickets for that show are still available. World/Inferno Friendship Society play their annual Hallowmas show at Warsaw on Halloween. Tickets for that show are on sale now. Former lead singer of Paul Revere & The Raiders, Mark Lindsay is playing on Halloween at Bowery Electric with The Doughboys, St. Philips Escalator, The Connection and DJ Tony Lo-Fi. Tickets for that show are on sale now. For something dancier, Gatekeeper, Mirror Mirror, DJ Bruno (Light Asylum), and DJ Nick (CHERYL) will take over Brooklyn Masonic Temple on Halloween. Tickets for that show are on sale now. Another similar option is catching DFA's Juan Maclean DJing Cameo on Halloween with Justin Strauss and Evan Michael. Tickets for that show are on sale now. The Cameo show starts at 10 and Juan Maclean is doing a 3 hour set, so you can probably get there after seeing his DFA labelmates Holy Ghost! play Terminal 5 with Midnight Magic. Tickets for that show are still available. Before Glasslands hosts the Peelander-Z show on Halloween, they'll "dress up" as The Black Lodge for a Twin Peaks party on October 25, the Friday before. Tickets for that party are on sale now. Jammy Halloween options include the Phil Lesh & Friends show at Capitol Theatre, which kicks off their 9-show NYC-area run, and Phish in Atlantic City, which kicks off their 3-night run in AC. And what's Halloween without a few cover shows? On October 30 at 285 Kent, local indie bands will take on rock bands of the past with Butter the Children as Pixies, Dead Stars as Nirvana, Le Rug as At The Drive-In, Turnip King as The Velvet Underground, and Honduras as Green Day. Tickets for that show are on sale now. The Stone hosts a much different kind with Eugene Chadbourne as Jimmy Carl Black, Evan Gallagher as Thelonious Monk, Thomas Heberer as Muggsy Spanier, Tatsuya Nakatani as Johnny Cash, Louie Pearlman as Cab Calloway, Barry Mitterhof as Jethro Burns, and special surprise guests. That goes down on Halloween at 8 PM and again at 10. Cake Shop also has a cover show on Halloween too but the lineup is TBA. Other Halloween options include the Masquerade Ball with a "world-renowned live DJ performance" at Highline Ballroom, the Bluegrass Halloween celebration at The Bell House on November 1 (tickets), and Dionne Werewolf (aka the werewolf ensemble that does Dionne Warwick covers) at Union Hall (10/31) (tickets). Plus, a bit out of NYC on Halloween is Yamantaka // Sonic Titan and Jenny Hval at Basilica Hudson. And don't forget, the Halloween Parade
14 days ago
**** NEW YORK'S LINCOLN CENTER Photos By: James Edstrom **** Rita Cosby With Kevin Spacey And Tomaczek Bednarek Rachel Pickup With Alan Cox Rita Cosby With Tara Fowler, Montel Wil...
**** NEW YORK'S LINCOLN CENTER Photos By: James Edstrom **** Rita Cosby With Kevin Spacey And Tomaczek Bednarek Rachel Pickup With Alan Cox Rita Cosby With Tara Fowler, Montel Williams And Deepak Chopra Emma Myles Tommy Tune Jill Martin Zineb Oukach Patricia Clarkson Tony lo Bianco Kathleen Turner With Rita Cosby Baz Luhrmann Hannah Yelland Evan Jonigkeit Derek Warburton Anthony Rapp Darlene Love Jenna And Rosanna Scotto With Rita Cosby Susan Lucci Wrenn Schmidt And Johnny Orsini Jackie Cruz With Alicia Reiner New York's Lincoln Center was the place to be when 134 young musicians from over 50 countries shared the passion of their talents last week in the name of peace. Introduced by Kevin Spacey, the concert was a big success and the organizers were excited to have laid the groundwork to mount this magnificent concert again next year. Young musicians rehearsed tirelessly for a month, and in the end, truly shined and presented themselves as some of the most exquisite music ambassadors their home countries could have ever hoped for. Major talents who turned out for the historic concert included Deepak Chopra, Rita Cosby, Montel Williams, Susan Lucci and Kathleen Turner. In addition, a celebrated host committee for the event with Denzel Washington, Neil Sedaka, Tony Orlando, Dionne Warwick, Lee Greenwood, Sigourney Weaver, and astronaut Buzz Aldrin lent their names in support. As Tomaczek Bednarek (WPO coordinating producer) made note, "it was a real honor to create lasting memories with such a celebrated and magnificent list of ‘star partners’ … I think for everyone here, this evenings event will forever hold a very special place in their hearts.” The singer-songwriter and producer went on to say, "The excellence and brilliance of the music which these young musicians poured out from the stage, truly gives us confidence that no matter what our backgrounds, no matter what cultural differences we have… through music, we can all speak and hear in one voice… and embrace the song and message of peace.” Tomaczek then noted that, "…every young musician in this orchestra brought something incredibly unique to what we experienced. Not only because of the vast differences in their situations, but also that which is embodied within their own creative brilliance… and the magnificence of the music which overflowed through each one of them distinctively and powerfully tonight!" The World Peace Orchestra truly delivered an amazing event. Photos By: James Edstrom/Times Square Society
21 days ago
Rumer’s 2010 single “Some Lovers,” from Burt Bacharach and Steven Sater’s musical of the same name, is the most recent track on Universal U.K.’s new box set Anyone Who Had a Heart: The Art of the Songwriter. Yet 2010 melts into 1965 like...
Rumer’s 2010 single “Some Lovers,” from Burt Bacharach and Steven Sater’s musical of the same name, is the most recent track on Universal U.K.’s new box set Anyone Who Had a Heart: The Art of the Songwriter. Yet 2010 melts into 1965 like a ray of sunshine on the “cloudy Christmas morning” in the song lyric. Sleigh bells gently underscore wistful flugelhorns as it begins, with Rumer’s dreamy, comforting vocals gracefully gliding over the bittersweet melody. “Everything we touch is still a dream,” she sings, and for three minutes or so, it is. Even shorn of its lyrics, “Some Lovers” would radiate the warm glow of nostalgia without ever seeming dated. The music of Burt Bacharach is sophisticated in its composition but simplicity itself in its piercing… 320 kbps | 304 MB | UL | CL | MC1+MC2 ** FLAC …directness. Anyone Who Had a Heart: The Art of the Songwriter has also been released in 2-disc, 40-track versions in both the U.K. and the U.S., with almost completely different track listings for each country. More puzzlingly, there are tracks on both editions that are not on the 6-CD box. Although the unique tracks on the U.S. and U.K. 2-CD versions aren’t particularly rare, it’s still disappointing that a potential buyer interested in all the music would have to buy three different releases to obtain “everything.” One would think a 6-CD box set would cover all of the bases. (Shades of the Steve Winwood box set of a few years back which had unique tracks on the highlights version!) Of these two distillations, the U.S. version is the more eccentric of the two with such surprising, and offbeat, tracks as Sybil’s dancefloor remake of “Don’t Make Me Over,” Smith’s rock cover of “Baby It’s You,” Gloria Gaynor’s disco “Walk On By,” The Marvelettes’ Motown-ized “Message to Michael” and Kevin Eubanks’ smooth jazz “That’s What Friends Are For.” (“On My Own” makes its only appearance here.) The U.K. edition is a more straightforward “Greatest Hits,” with some Brit-centric choices like Adam Faith’s “Message to Martha” replacing The Marvelettes’ on the American 2-CD set and Marlene Dietrich’s (in German, no less!) on the box set. Cilla Black does “Alfie” on the U.K. set – as does Barbra Streisand – but only Streisand gets the slot on the U.S. version. Both Streisand and Nancy Wilson’s “Alfie” are on the box set! Bacharach and David’s muse Dionne Warwick has three songs on the British set, but only one on the American counterpart. Some of the alterations are sensible; others seem made at random. (Why are two versions of “Alfie” featured on one compilation with only 40 songs out of literally hundreds to choose from?) The U.S. version has a remastering credit for Mark Omann at UMS-W in Los Angeles. Various Artists, Anyone Who Had a Heart: The Best of Burt Bacharach – The Art of the Songwriter U.S. 2-CD Version (Universal/Hip-o, 2013) (Amazon U.S. / Amazon U.K.) CD 1 Aretha Franklin – I Say a Little Prayer B.J. Thomas – Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head Dusty Springfield – I Just Don’t Know What to Do with Myself Etta James – Waiting for Charlie to Come Home Marty Robbins – The Story of My Life Sergio Mendes and Brasil ’66 – The Look of Love Brook Benton – A House is Not a Home Christopher Cross – Arthur’s Theme (Best That You Can Do) Smith – Baby It’s You Gene McDaniels – Tower of Strength Perry Como – Magic Moments Rick Nelson – Take a Broken Heart Brenda Lee – Wishin’ and Hopin’ Sybil – Don’t Make Me Over Elvis Presley – Any Day Now Gene Pitney – 24 Hours from Tulsa Isaac Hayes – I’ll Never Fall in Love Again Ron Isley – Love’s (Still) The Answer Dionne Warwick – Anyone Who Had a Heart Jackie DeShannon – What the World Needs Now is Love CD 2 Tom Jones – What’s New Pussycat Barbra Streisand – Alfie The Walker Brothers – Make It Easy on Yourself Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass – This Guy’s in Love with You The Marvelettes – Message to Michael The 5th Dimension – One Less Bell to Answer Gloria Gaynor – Walk On By Astrud Gilberto – T
23 days ago
Dionne Warwick attends Magnolia Pictures And Participant Media With The Cinema Society Present A Screening Of “A Place At The Table” at MOMA – Celeste Bartos Theater on February 27, 2013 in New York City *The music indu...
Dionne Warwick attends Magnolia Pictures And Participant Media With The Cinema Society Present A Screening Of “A Place At The Table” at MOMA – Celeste Bartos Theater on February 27, 2013 in New York City *The music industry’s largest record companies are suing SiriusXM Radio for royalties it says the satellite radio company didn’t pay for recordings from before 1972. Capitol Records, Sony Music Entertainment, Universal Music Group Recordings Inc. and Warner Music Group Corp., as well as ABKCO Music & Records Inc., an independent company that manages music rights for such acts as the Rolling Stones and The Animals, filed the lawsuit against Sirius XM Radio Inc. on Wednesday. It seeks unspecified damages and a judgment about the rights involved in pre-1972 recordings. Sound recordings weren’t brought under federal copyright protection until 1972, instead being governed through state laws. In recent years, the U.S. Copyright Office has asked for opinions about bringing so-called “oldies” under the law. “Classic tracks recorded before 1972 are an important part of American culture and an important of SiriusXM’s programming,” Dionne Warwick said in a statement provided by The Recording Industry Association of America. “The great artists played on the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s stations should be treated with respect and properly compensated as SiriusXM is required to do, so I am asking SiriusXM not to ‘Walk On By’ and do the right thing!” The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles, claims “a significant portion of SiriusXM’s channels feature classic sound recordings, including channels exclusively devoted to performing recordings from the ’40s, ’50s, ’60s and ’70s.” It lists the Beatles, Beach Boys, Supremes, Four Tops, Aretha Franklin and Simon & Garfunkel among the acts that can be heard on SiriusXM stations like “’60s on 6.” The suit is the third major complaint filed against Sirius XM in recent weeks. SoundExchange, a company that collects royalties on behalf of recording artists, filed a similar lawsuit last month in Washington, D.C.
27 days ago
When I was still not yet a teenager, I had The Beatles and the Stones down cold. I knew every Ringo fill, Lennon harmony, Keith riff and Mick shimmy. I knew it and respected it as I made my way toward Mott The Hoople, Roxy Music, Yes, Ki...
When I was still not yet a teenager, I had The Beatles and the Stones down cold. I knew every Ringo fill, Lennon harmony, Keith riff and Mick shimmy. I knew it and respected it as I made my way toward Mott The Hoople, Roxy Music, Yes, King Crimson and David Bowie, all while savoring the joys of AM radio staples like Johnny Nash's "I Can See Clearly Now," Roberta Flack's "Killing Me Softly," The Doobies' "Long Train Running" and of course, my own great collection of 45s that included The Turtles, The 4 Seasons and the Herman's Hermits, The Supremes, The Rascals and Marvin Gaye.During that time, I went through a big band phase, as well. My cousin and I would listen to Tommy Dorsey, Benny Goodman, Charlie Barnett, Stan Kenton and Glenn Miller, and just get lost in the arrangements. Then, we'd take a break and listen to Genesis and T. Rex and "Hot Rats."Of course, there were hours and hours of just Frank, Dean and Sammy, with essence of Bobby Darin for flavor.What about Bob? Yep. Dylan had his place, too.All of this took place before I reached high school.I should point out that I had some of the greatest music lovers around me. Aunts & uncles, friends of uncles, cousins, friends of cousins, neighbors and grandparents, who at the time ranged in age from 25-60. These are people who also listened to The Beatles and the Stones and Top 40 radio while telling me, "Listen to "Low Spark Of High-Heeled Boys. You'll dig it." Or, "Listen to Dion in between those two Yes albums." We didn't scoff at the Tijuana Brass. People who were then, the age I am now, enjoying the music that youngsters were listening to, as well as the music they embraced from their past.Sure, not everyone was that open to the sounds of rock and roll. I had one Aunt who listened to Slim Whitman, Strauss waltzes and Bobby Vinton and believed the Beatles were the catalysts behind the Vietnam War. But for the most part, I was surrounded by people who understood good music. Age didn't matter.That said, I am starting to really tire of the phrase "Hey you kids, get off my lawn!" when referencing any adult who voices disdain at today's popular music. In the wake of the Robin Thicke/Miley Cyrus debacle, I've heard too many say, "Our parents were just as appalled at Elvis Presley." That may be true, but not mine. Not my grandparents either. Am I the exception? Well, yes, if you compare my life to the Cleavers. But after 20 years in music retail, not to mention all those hours prior as a consumer, everyone I knew, music lovers, were more like me. They had stories of growing up in households where their 50 year old parents had music playing all the time, and not just Andy Williams or Mantovani. My grandfather loved his music LOUD! At 70, he was listening to his favorites, The Drifters and Dionne Warwick, country music especially. But he also truly dug "The White Album" and T. Rex's "The Slider." (That's right! He loved "Metal Guru.")Miley and Thicke are an extreme, so let me take this into potentially dangerous waters for a moment.Recently someone suggested a band called The Lone Bellow. Actually, a number of people I respect suggested this band. So I listened. And I liked it a bit. But not enough to finish the entire record. I found myself growing more impatient as the music played, and finally stopped it by track 6. I was bored. This is not about The Lone Bellow. Remove "The Lone Bellow" and insert any of a hundred bands or artists and the feeling remains the same. Good stuff. Not great. Good songs. Not great. The bar gets lower and lower and lower.Forget Top 40 and autotune and the lack of imagination and the completely offensive mechanics of the music business. The Mileys and Thickes and Ke$has are zits on the ass of the big picture. Even the bands and singer-songwriters we should pay attention to, the successful ones, just miss it most of the time. Yes, I'm getting older. Everyone is, except for the people running the show. The people responsible are getting younger and that
about 1 month ago
Gay
Here she is swinging......and now, doing an interpretive dance...Either way, she is a sublime somnambulist.
Here she is swinging......and now, doing an interpretive dance...Either way, she is a sublime somnambulist.
about 1 month ago