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Last time the word 'outcast' was on everyone's lips, it was the name of a band (albeit with a 'K' not a 'c'), whose hit Hey Ya, forced clubbers and houseworkers alike to dance like people possessed. Come 2014, the possession stays but ev...
Last time the word 'outcast' was on everyone's lips, it was the name of a band (albeit with a 'K' not a 'c'), whose hit Hey Ya, forced clubbers and houseworkers alike to dance like people possessed. Come 2014, the possession stays but everything else changes. The 'c' is back.Marking writer Robert Kirkman's return to monthly horror comics since launching The Walking Dead, Outcast will tell the darkened tale of a man shunned in society, plagued by possession and about to realise the evils that beset him plague the entire world.The adventures of Kyle Barnes have been in development for almost two years, drawn by Paul Azaceta, the series has Fox International eyeing it as a possible TV project before the first issue even hits.If you need to see people possessed in the interim however, just turn your computer speakers to the window and play this track as people pass by... What do you think?
about 2 hours ago
Paul Tumey is back today with a new column trying to make sense of the long and varied career of George Carlson. Here’s a snippet: In the year 8113 A.D., the most remembered cartoonist of our time may not be any of our currently re...
Paul Tumey is back today with a new column trying to make sense of the long and varied career of George Carlson. Here’s a snippet: In the year 8113 A.D., the most remembered cartoonist of our time may not be any of our currently revered comics creators. Not Winsor McCay, George Herriman, Jack Kirby, Robert Crumb, Art Spiegelman, or Chris Ware. As incredible as it may seem, long after the last comic books of our time have crumpled into dust, the cartoonist of our era that People of The Future will dig (perhaps literally) could be a guy named George Carlson — an under-appreciated, largely overlooked cartoonist, illustrator, game designer, and graphic artist extraordinaire who will finally get his due with the forthcoming release of Perfect Nonsense: The Chaotic Comics and Goofy Games of George Carlson by Daniel Yezbick. The spirit of George Carlson’s playful, surreal world can be seen in everything from Pee-wee’s Playhouse to 24-hour comics. People of the distant future may know about Carlson not because of Yezbick’s book (although it’d be nice to think so), but more likely because of the Crypt of Civilization, a room-sized time capsule that lies underneath what is currently known as Oglethorpe University, in Atlanta, Georgia. When future human beings pry open the rusty door of the Crypt, they will see plaques on the walls created by George Carlson. The bold, Art Deco graphics on the plaques, barely visible in the photograph of the Crypt’s interior, are presented in a manner that looks back in time to the hieroglyphs seen on the walls of ancient Egyptian burial chambers. In 1940, the Crypt’s creator, Oglethorpe University president Dr. Thornwell Jacobs set the year for the time capsule’s opening at 8113 A.D. – exactly the same amount of years into the future as the number of years spanning backwards in time from 1940 to the oldest known Egyptian tomb. Elsewhere: —Profiles & Interviews. Steven Heller profiles Sunday Press publisher Peter Maresca. Rebecca Meiser at Cleveland magazine profiles Joyce Brabner about her handling of Harvey Pekar’s legacy, her sometimes prickly relationships with collaborators, and her own upcoming work. I can’t wait to listen to Gil Roth’s interview with Drew Friedman. Missed this earlier, but Last Gasp has begun a series of Weirdo: Where Are They Now? mini-profiles of Weirdo contributors. —Fangoria‘s Philip Nutman, who also worked as a comics writer and editor, has passed away. —JC Menu has sent in his tribute to Kim Thompson. We’ve added it to the Thompson tributes page here on the site. —Anime News Network reports on the cancellation of Barefoot Gen translator Alan Gleason’s appearance at a Japanese school, apparently partially due to ongoing political controversy over Keiji Nakazawa’s work. —Jessica Abel & Matt Madden have released the longlist of Notable Comics for Houghton Mifflin’s Best American Comics of 2013. —The Columbus Dispatch reports on the expansion of the Billy Ireland museum. —Tom Spurgeon has posted an early review of Joe Sacco’s The Great War. —And finally, Peggy Burns and the D&Q store appear briefly in this video:
about 9 hours ago
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man play a song for me/I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to/Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man play a song for me/in the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you (Bob Dylan, 1964) In the...
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man play a song for me/I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to/Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man play a song for me/in the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you (Bob Dylan, 1964) In the year 8113 A.D., the most remembered cartoonist of our time may not be any of our currently revered comics creators. Not Winsor McCay, George Herriman, Jack Kirby, Robert Crumb, Art Spiegelman, or Chris Ware. As incredible as it may seem, long after the last comic books of our time have crumpled into dust, the cartoonist of our era that People of The Future will dig (perhaps literally) could be a guy named George Carlson — an under-appreciated, largely overlooked cartoonist, illustrator, game designer, and graphic artist extraordinaire who will finally get his due with the forthcoming release of Perfect Nonsense: The Chaotic Comics and Goofy Games of George Carlson by Daniel Yezbick (Fantagraphics, December 2013). The spirit of George Carlson’s playful, surreal world can be seen in everything from Pee-wee’s Playhouse to 24-hour comics. Coming in December, a new bookon George Carlson People of the distant future may know about Carlson not because of Yezbick’s book (although it’d be nice to think so), but more likely because of the Crypt of Civilization, a room-sized time capsule that lies underneath what is currently known as Oglethorpe University, in Atlanta, Georgia. When future human beings pry open the rusty door of the Crypt, they will see plaques on the walls created by George Carlson. The bold, Art Deco graphics on the plaques, barely visible in the photograph (below) of the Crypt’s interior, are presented in a manner that looks back in time to the hieroglyphs seen on the walls of ancient Egyptian burial chambers. In 1940, the Crypt’s creator, Oglethorpe University president Dr. Thornwell Jacobs set the year for the time capsule’s opening at 8113 A.D. – exactly the same amount of years into the future as the number of years spanning backwards in time from 1940 to the oldest known Egyptian tomb. The Crypt was one of the first and most ambitious projects of its kind. It preserves a summary of Western civilization’s achievements and knowledge in science, art, and history. Dr. Jacobs hired commercial artist George Carlson to create the pictograph panels that tell the history of communications and explain how to access the treasures buried in the tomb. The artist that Jacobs chose to create these all-important messages could not have been more appropriate, for much of Carlson’s work is concerned with the tension between the puzzle of the past and the riddle of the future. The Crypt of Civilization, sealed in 1940 and scheduled to be opened in the year 8313, contains wall plaques that feature the art of George Carlson. (Click on this image to see a larger version) Even if Carlson’s work is known to the future by virtue of being included in a blast-proof time capsule, it nonetheless merits more attention and study than it has thus far received. If anyone today who studies old comics knows the name George Carlson, it’s because of his 80-odd (and odd would be the operative word) comic book stories that appear in the 42 issues of Jingle Jangle Comics published between 1942 and 1949 (you can read four of these stories online here at Mykal Banta’s Big Blog of Kid’s Comics). These beautifully cartooned, freewheeling stories sport lyrical titles like “The Sea-Seasoned Sea-Cook and the Heroic Pancake,” “Sleepy Yollo the Bedless Norseman,” and “The Pie-Face Prince of Old Pretzlebug” (a continuing series under the one title). Since 1970, Carlson’s Jingle Jangle stories have been admired and respectfully praised by Harlan Ellison, Ron Goulart, Martin Gardner, Dan Nadel, and Art Spiegelman, who said that Carlson was one of the reasons for the existence of The TOON Treasury of Classic Children’s Comics, which he selected and edited with Françoise Mouly i
about 9 hours ago
Green Hornet #6 Cover. 2013. Ink(ed by Joe Rivera) on bristol board, 11 × 17?. This came out last week (preview here) so be sure to pick it up. This cover was definitely one of my best ideas for the series, but I don't like the...
Green Hornet #6 Cover. 2013. Ink(ed by Joe Rivera) on bristol board, 11 × 17?. This came out last week (preview here) so be sure to pick it up. This cover was definitely one of my best ideas for the series, but I don't like the finished product as much as I had hoped. Part of me wants to try it again as a painted piece, perhaps with smoking barrels this time. I wish H.J. Ward were here to do it right. Me looking nervous... and a bunch of internet reference inks by my Paw cyan print of pencils pencils over digital print digital sketch digital layout
about 14 hours ago
When Scott Jones went into be tattooed by the ultra-talented Matt Lapping, the sport fan wanted The Hulk emblazoned in ink on his thigh. When the idea of adding She-Hulk struck, both artist and canvas agreed it wouldn't be easy being gre...
When Scott Jones went into be tattooed by the ultra-talented Matt Lapping, the sport fan wanted The Hulk emblazoned in ink on his thigh. When the idea of adding She-Hulk struck, both artist and canvas agreed it wouldn't be easy being green, and opted to mix up the colour pallet by inking in Red Hulk instead.17 hours (plus touch-ups) went into this gamma-radiating work or cool - winning best large colour at the Brighton Tattoo Convention in the UK. And so it should. Not only is the art flawless for a 3D canvas, those colours would be hard to beat if you even had 12 of comics top colourists advising on the sidelines!Red Hulk may be bigger, but it sure seems like She-Hulk is still the one you don't want to mess with! What do you think?
about 15 hours ago
If one city on earth suits the bright lights and hi-tech feel of Marvel's Iron Man, it's Hong Kong. In 2016, Tony Stark's alter-ego will come to call the island mega-city home in all-new ways, with Disney unravelling plans fo...
If one city on earth suits the bright lights and hi-tech feel of Marvel's Iron Man, it's Hong Kong. In 2016, Tony Stark's alter-ego will come to call the island mega-city home in all-new ways, with Disney unravelling plans for an Iron Man attraction in the Tomorrow Land section of it's Hong Kong based theme park.Forget Godzilla, with giant monsters and robots such as Fing Fang Foom and Ultimo part of his rouges gallery, the armoured Avenger would makes for an obvious choice Eastern-pop flavoured adventure, and that's before we even talk about him tackling The Mandarin.Priced by analysts, the Iron Man Experience will cost the company a true playboy billionaire price-tag - around $100 million to build. Rumoured to include a hall of armour, gift shop and pavillion, the core event will be an Iron Man ride that allows us regular folk to take flight with the superhero, fighting alien forces across the skyline and streets of the magical city. What do you think? For the complete run-down, click here.
about 22 hours ago
Facts, Fantastic Facts and a Sports Quiz – Vintage Filler Comics by the always-appealing Henry Boltinoff
Facts, Fantastic Facts and a Sports Quiz – Vintage Filler Comics by the always-appealing Henry Boltinoff
1 day ago
I'm in Athens still, (back home to London tomorrow, le sigh...) and today I'm actually doing some work... well, doing rough designs anyway. Here's the rough art with some halftone...and the thumbnail design, drawn on the back...
I'm in Athens still, (back home to London tomorrow, le sigh...) and today I'm actually doing some work... well, doing rough designs anyway. Here's the rough art with some halftone...and the thumbnail design, drawn on the back of a flyer in biro, while sitting in Radio Bubble bar/cafe in Athens while my friend Spiros did his live broadcast!My great friend Manolis at TIND Screenprinters will be working with me to realise these as Limited edition screen prints. there'll be a few designs yet to come!I'll also do some Giclée prints and some other stuff.I'm working on a new short series idea, and also about to restart on SGDM .The last few months have been a whirl wind of moving house and studio... and I still am considering a move much further afield...which I'm excited about if I can make it work!!! Thanks to all my great friends in Athens!!! XXX Ruf
1 day ago
So, last week I fucked up and started a tumblr. Anime + manga. Immediately, the compartmentalization of my life, which I’d cultivated for years, collapsed into a heaping mess of JPEGs. I mean, should I not be posting about Japanese...
So, last week I fucked up and started a tumblr. Anime + manga. Immediately, the compartmentalization of my life, which I’d cultivated for years, collapsed into a heaping mess of JPEGs. I mean, should I not be posting about Japanese stuff at the top of this column anymore? On the other hand… we all still love Yoshikazu Ebisu, right? First seen in English via 1996′s Comics Underground Japan and rarely seen since, Ebisu is one of those artists who’s grasped a certain amount of mainstream renown in his homeland — Taiyo Matsumoto is an avowed fan — but mostly finds himself associated with ‘weird’ manga art in the west, particularly France, where Le Dernier cri recently featured him in an illustration collection titled (*sigh*) Kawaï Kencho Kintama. That’s not where I found the image above, though; it’s actually part of a story, “Dirty Girl,” which was presented earlier this year en français by United Dead Artists — founded by Stéphane Blanquet, if I’m not mistaken — as part of a 36-page comic book-format(!) collection of pornographic works titled A sens unique. Probably *not* due from Diamond any time soon, but the €5 retail price makes it eminently importable. Not content to simply smut it up, however, the oft-satirical Ebisu transforms the book into an apocalyptic depiction of male desire. “Dirty Girl” is merely the prelude, in which a creeper ‘reads’ a woman’s body language on the train as enticing him to ravage her – she then kicks his ass, and the man, inevitably, blames her for leading him on. Soon, however, flying saucers are attacking. There are virtually no words in the second story, “La Jeune fille et le loup,” which finds a naked girl crawling from the wreckage of her post-bombing home. She has lost her parents. Soon, she is pursued by a hungry wolf, which knocks her to the ground and… chews the cheeks off her rear end, as lasers blaze from above. A gross fantasy? A fairy story’s warning against sexual activity transported to a (future) post-War setting? A parable of amoral masculine desire? It’s quite difficult to say. “L’Homme à sens unique” rounds out the suite by pitting one man against one woman in a world of the dead, skeletons laying in spiked blue grass and shadowy aircraft roaring overhead. A man with an arrow on his back confronts a woman with worms erupting from her vagina on a straight purple road. In a reversal of “Dirty Girl,” the woman now seems desire the man’s enticement, but he is angry and repulsed. Is this the conclusion of male fears of female sexuality? “…tu es un homme plein de préjugés,” she declares, as the man sweats in her presence. Certainly these works bear further examination, ideally coupled with additional Ebisu works; Comics Underground Japan co-translator Kevin Quigley cited to Ebisu’s “hapless and perverse salary men,” as manifestations of “a Swiftian horror and disgust with the world” characteristic of underground mangaka. From that, we might simply abridge the identification to ‘hapless and perverse men,’ alternately obsessed and disgusted with women, and doomed to fulfill their awful longings in only the bleakest circumstances. Not exactly sex-positive erotoca, but a sharp dispatch from a world that damns us for courting too many times a state of zero comprehension. *** PLEASE NOTE: What follows is not a series of capsule reviews but an annotated selection of items listed by Diamond Comic Distributors for release to comic book retailers in North America on the particular Wednesday, or, in the event of a holiday or occurrence necessitating the close of UPS in a manner that would impact deliveries, Thursday, identified in the column title above. Not every listed item will necessarily arrive at every comic book retailer, in that s
1 day ago
It’s Tuesday, so Joe McCulloch is here to give you the goods on the week’s more interesting releases. Guess who has a Tumblr? The aforementioned Mr. McCulloch, that’s who. I didn’t know about the YouTube channel f...
It’s Tuesday, so Joe McCulloch is here to give you the goods on the week’s more interesting releases. Guess who has a Tumblr? The aforementioned Mr. McCulloch, that’s who. I didn’t know about the YouTube channel for the forthcoming book The Secret History of Marvel Comics. The great Al Jaffee’s archives are going to Columbia University. Tom Spurgeon reviews The Best of EC volume 1, Artist’s Edition. And Treasury of Mini-Comics, reviewed. Finally, we’ve all felt this way.
1 day ago