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I just want everyone to be happy, is that so terrible?
I just want everyone to be happy, is that so terrible?
about 4 hours ago
Think you can twerk as well as Miley? I've got something for that. Fell in love with Drake's Nothing Was The Same? I've got something for that. Or, if you feel like getting a little nostalgic, I definitely have something for that.
Think you can twerk as well as Miley? I've got something for that. Fell in love with Drake's Nothing Was The Same? I've got something for that. Or, if you feel like getting a little nostalgic, I definitely have something for that.
about 5 hours ago
I had no response, no words, no comeback for how utterly shitty I felt in that moment of complete condescension.
I had no response, no words, no comeback for how utterly shitty I felt in that moment of complete condescension.
about 6 hours ago
The national education story of the week isn't the shutdown or the charter protests in NYC or anything else going on out East but rather the drama surrounding the much-delayed, much-weakened California law to speed the removal of sexual ...
The national education story of the week isn't the shutdown or the charter protests in NYC or anything else going on out East but rather the drama surrounding the much-delayed, much-weakened California law to speed the removal of sexual predators in the classroom that now awaits Governor Brown's decision.  As EdSource Today explains, many administrator and advocacy groups are against the final version that was passed by the legislature, however teachers unions support it and it's being championed by a legislator who was among those who scuttled last year's much stronger version of the legislation. Now that I've got your attention, here are some other recent stories about the drama:  Will Sexual Predator Teachers Hide Under California BillAB 375? (LA Weekly);  California school bills show teacherunion power (Sacto Bee); Bill to streamline teacher dismissals heads to governor; critics call it flawed (SJ Mercury News). How about someone asking Randi Weingarten, Dennis Van Roekel, or Arne Duncan what their positions are on the legislation -- or whether they're going to intervene (as they seem willing to do in many other state and local issues)? How about StudentsFirst, Stand for Children (happy birthday, Jonah!) and DFER getting more active on the issue and letting lawmakers including Brown know that they're being watched.
about 7 hours ago
This blog post is the fourth part in a series that takes a look at recent changes to the credit criteria for Parent PLUS loans and the subsequent effect on colleges and universities. You can find the rest of the series here.Since making ...
This blog post is the fourth part in a series that takes a look at recent changes to the credit criteria for Parent PLUS loans and the subsequent effect on colleges and universities. You can find the rest of the series here.Since making relatively minor changes to the credit check requirements for Parent PLUS loans last year, the Department of Education has been under a firestorm of criticism from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and their lobbying organization, the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO). According to HBCUs, the impact of the policy change caused a significant decline in enrollments and a huge loss in revenue for their institutions. In an effort to ease tensions, Education Secretary Arne Duncan recently apologized to HBCU leaders at their annual meeting saying, “I am not satisfied with the way we handled the updating and changes to the PLUS loan program. Communication internally and externally was poor. I apologize for that, and the real impact it had.”But if Secretary Duncan really wanted to apologize to the colleges most affected by the change to Parent PLUS loans, he should have been talking to for-profit colleges, not HBCUs. After all, since the policy change was implemented two years ago, for-profits have lost approximately $790 million dollars more than HBCUs in PLUS disbursements. Why is that? The for-profit sector has a much higher percentage of Parent PLUS borrowers than at HBCUs.Using recently released data from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Federal Student Aid (FSA), I analyzed Parent PLUS loan data from pre-recession 2006 to 2013. From 2009 to 2011, both for-profits and HBCUs saw huge increases in recipients (approximately 50,000 and 15,000 more recipients respectively) and disbursements (approximately $450 million and $156 million respectively). This was the peak of the recession, at a time when family net worth diminished while college prices soared. Parents turned to PLUS loans to help send their children to higher-priced colleges that could not or would not help them fill the gap with institutional aid.<a href='#'><img alt='Dashboard 1 ' src='http://public.tableausoftware.com/static/images/Pa/ParentPLUS/Dashboard1/1_rss.png' style='border: none' /></a> Learn About Tableau<a href='#'><img alt='Dashboard 3 ' src='http://public.tableausoftware.com/static/images/Pa/ParentPLUS/Dashboard3/1_rss.png' style='border: none' /></a> Learn About TableauHowever, since the change to the credit check, both sectors saw huge declines in recipients and disbursements (Tables 1 and 2). From 2011 to 2013, HBCUs experienced a 45 percent decline in PLUS borrowers and a 27 percent decline in PLUS disbursements. The for-profits experienced a much starker decline over the same period. At for-profits, PLUS loan borrowers and disbursements declined 54 percent. In addition, while HBCUs experienced a decline in PLUS recipients over the past five years, their disbursements increased 14 percent. Meanwhile, the for-profit sector experienced a five-year 30 percent decline in recipients and a 33 percent decline in disbursements.What’s most startling is the substantial overrepresentation of Parent PLUS borrowers at for-profits overall and compared with HBCUs (see Chart 3 and Table 3).2 While HBCUs have been the most vocal opponents of the changes to PLUS loans, they actually make up a very small share of volume in the program. Approximately 2 percent of undergraduates are in HBCUs and these institutions represent between 3 and 4 percent of PLUS borrowers. The data from for-profit institutions, however, show a drastic overrepresentati
about 7 hours ago
Kris Jenner and Bruce Jenner have separated after 22 years.
Kris Jenner and Bruce Jenner have separated after 22 years.
about 7 hours ago
Malala Yousafzai was on a bus returning home from school exactly one year ago,  Oct. 9, 2012, when she was shot in the head by a gunman from the Taliban, which had earlier banned girls from going to school in … Continue reading ...
Malala Yousafzai was on a bus returning home from school exactly one year ago,  Oct. 9, 2012, when she was shot in the head by a gunman from the Taliban, which had earlier banned girls from going to school in … Continue reading →
about 8 hours ago
With the partial shutdown of the federal government well into its second week, it’s reasonable to ask what lessons students might be absorbing from the actions of Congress – or lack thereof. Peter Levine, director of the Center for Infor...
With the partial shutdown of the federal government well into its second week, it’s reasonable to ask what lessons students might be absorbing from the actions of Congress – or lack thereof. Peter Levine, director of the Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning & Engagement (CIRCLE) at Tufts University, told me the political stalemate might translate into a short-term “teachable moment” for a class on government. But in the long run, it’s a less-than-ideal curriculum. “What we’re seeing now is so at odds with what we teach in civics classes that it’s going to cause cognitive dissonance,” Levine said. He added that students already know there's a disconnect between what they're being taught about how U.S. government is supposed to function and the realities of current events. And the shutdown only contributes to that gap, he added. (For more on how the shutdown is impacting public education, Education Week's Alyson Klein is tackling the tough questions for the Politics K-12 blog.) Levine’s organization recently convened a commission to examine civic learning and engagement among young people, leading to a new report released today at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. The Commission on Youth Voting and Civic Knowledge conducted an extensive mix of surveys and interviews (including repeats over time to measure changes) with more than 700 teachers and more than 6,000 young people. Among the key takeaways: On the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as “The Nation’s Report Card,” white students from affluent families were “four to six times as likely to exceed the ‘proficient’ level” on the civics test, when compared with their black or Hispanic classmates from low-income households. (Irony alert: If you're looking for more on NAEP, you won't find it on the official government site. It's been shut down by the shutdown.) Even in presidential elections, fewer than half of eligible young Americans vote. Those who do show up at the polls are more affluent and highly educated than those who don’t vote. Nine out of 10 Americans ages 18-24 failed to meet the organization’s benchmark of “informed engagement” last year, defined as the following: “registered, voted, answered at least one (out? of two) campaign knowledge questions correctly, answered four or more general political knowledge questions correctly, voted consistently with their personal opinion on?a campaign issue of their choice, and followed the news fairly or very closely during the election season.” While neither voter turnout nor political knowledge among young people has declined much since the 1970s, the political debate has become “more confusing, alienating, and polarizing,” the report’s authors contend. “The degree of pushback and controversy surrounding the very idea of civic engagement is new,” Levine told me. “If I had to highlight just one statistic, it’s that a quarter of (the government and civics) teachers said their students’ parents would object to discussion of politics in the classroom.” As Levine pointed out, there’s little incentive for teachers to risk the heat of using a potentially controversial current event to engage students. “It’s not in the (state) standards, and it’s not on the high-stakes tests,” Levine said. Creative and determined teachers can usually find opportunities to incorporate these kinds of classroom activities, Levine said, but there needs to be more explicit support for them to do so. While not including a specific set of recommendations for civics, the new Common Core State Standards (adopted by 46 states and the District of Columbia) offer some promising opportunities thanks to the emphasis on encouraging students to read nonfiction texts, Levine said. The commission makes a number of recommendations, including encouraging states to adopt policies that support teachers’ efforts to include more current events (including the controversial ones) in their lesson plans. They also advise low
about 8 hours ago
His droopy eyes make him look sad and longing like North West grasping at hope for a normal childhood.
His droopy eyes make him look sad and longing like North West grasping at hope for a normal childhood.
about 8 hours ago
From last night's PBS: "Forty-five New York City public high school students are taking big strides toward achieving their dreams by learning how to work together on creating fully functional, original cellphone apps with business plans...
From last night's PBS: "Forty-five New York City public high school students are taking big strides toward achieving their dreams by learning how to work together on creating fully functional, original cellphone apps with business plans. John Tulenko of Learning Matters reports on how one summer program trains kids to be high-tech entrepreneurs."
about 9 hours ago