Elton John

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One of two things will happen on ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live!’ tonight. There will either be an epic bro-hug between Jimmy Kimmel and Kanye West or Kanye will choke the smarmy life out of the late night host. Either way, the world wil...
One of two things will happen on ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live!’ tonight. There will either be an epic bro-hug between Jimmy Kimmel and Kanye West or Kanye will choke the smarmy life out of the late night host. Either way, the world will be watching. “And as if Elton John isn’t enough for one week we’ve also got a great—and potentially uncomfortable—show planned for tomorrow. Kanye West will be here,” Kimmel said during his show Tuesday night. “Kanye and I had a disagreement a couple of weeks ago and it got a little bit out of hand. Tomorrow night, we will sit down and discuss it like normal people do—on television,” he explained. For anyone who missed it, apparently Kanye West was none too pleased when Kimmel ran a parody of an interview West had done with the BBC. The segment involved children re-enacting the transcript from the interview, parts of which were slightly unintelligible on Kanye’s part. Kanye took to Twitter in a glorious, all-caps rage, saying “JIMMY KIMMEL IS OUT OF LINE TO TRY AND SPOOF IN ANY WAY THE FIRST PIECE OF HONEST MEDIA IN YEARS.” Kanye fired off a few more choice tweets before Kimmel got wind of it. First, he acknowledged that, clearly, Kanye was mad at him. Then he started baiting West. if it’s not too much trouble @kanyewest, would you mind using @jimmykimmel? Thanks — Jimmy Kimmel (@jimmykimmel) September 27, 2013 Because poking the bear is always a good idea. But when you get paid for laughs and that bear is Kanye West, maybe it does pay to plug away, safely behind a keyboard. Kanye then spent some time creating the masterpiece you see here, calling Kimmel a “no good pussy.” While Kimmel kept it clean, he did keep antagonizing West. Which brings us to now. What will go down when Kanye West gets in the same room as Jimmy Kimmel tonight? There’s only one way to find out, and that’s by watching Jimmy Kimmel Live! Or reading about it here tomorrow. Kanye West To Appear On ‘Jimmy Kimmel Live’; Is The Twitter Feud Squashed? is a post from: The Inquisitr News
about 2 hours ago
Men
From a Vietnam War veteran making a statement in 1975 to the first out NBA star in 2013, here are some of the biggest moments captured in print. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich, a Vietnam War veteran, appeared on the cover of Time in...
From a Vietnam War veteran making a statement in 1975 to the first out NBA star in 2013, here are some of the biggest moments captured in print. Sgt. Leonard Matlovich, a Vietnam War veteran, appeared on the cover of Time in 1975: en.wikipedia.org He famously stated: leonardmatlovich.com He would go on to challenge the United States military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy. youtube.com Sir Elton John came out in the pages of Rolling Stone in February 1976: Rolling Stone Cover by David Nutter / Via barewalls.com View Entire List ›
about 2 hours ago
It was always going to be a tough week for newcomers Lorde, Tyler Farr and HAIM, whose debut albums all went up against the release of Justin Timberlake‘s The 20/20 Experience — 2 of 2. Still, all involved can pop a bottle knowing ...
It was always going to be a tough week for newcomers Lorde, Tyler Farr and HAIM, whose debut albums all went up against the release of Justin Timberlake‘s The 20/20 Experience — 2 of 2. Still, all involved can pop a bottle knowing they landed in the Top 10 of the Billboard 200. Unsurprisingly, Timberlake goes in at #1 with his second volume of his 20/20 Experience, after it sold 350,000 copies. His previous LP, released in March, debuted at the top with 968,000 sold. At that time, JT had the Top 5 smash “Suit & Tie” under his belt and “Mirrors” on its way up the chart. So far his latest LP has produced the minor hit “Take Back The Night,” which peaked at #29 on the Hot 100. Timberlake is now the second artist to score two #1 albums in 2013, following Luke Bryan. (The country singer pulled off the feat with Spring Break… Here To Party and Crash My Party.) The latter’s latest is still hanging in there at #4 this week. As for those other debuts, Lorde’s Pure Heroine debuts at #3 (129,000), Tyler Farr’s Redneck Crazy goes in at #5 (29,000) and HAIM’s Days Are Gone winds up at #6 (26,000). The Top 10 Of The Billboard 200 Chart 1. Justin Timberlake, The 20/20 Experience — 2 Of 2 *new* *1 week* 2. Drake, Nothing Was The Same 3. Lorde, Pure Heroine *new* 4. Luke Bryan, Crash My Party 5. Tyler Farr, Redneck Crazy *new* 6. HAIM, Days Are Gone *new* 7. Kings Of Leon, Mechanical Bull 8. Cher, Closer To The Truth 9. Jack Johnson, From Here To Now To You 10. Elton John, The Diving Board
about 3 hours ago
First 2 Board | First2Board What's Your Point?After continuing with this particular situation which has consumed an incredible amount of my time in recent months, it was nice to be able to finally travel by airplane again. When I travel...
First 2 Board | First2Board What's Your Point?After continuing with this particular situation which has consumed an incredible amount of my time in recent months, it was nice to be able to finally travel by airplane again. When I travel, I have a playlist of preferred songs on my portable electronic device specifically for flying as a passenger aboard an airplane. I also have playlists of preferred songs for driving on the highway, rainy days, rainy nights, sunny days, night time, and the beach. I am quite particular about when certain music should be played. For example, there is nothing like listening to Steppin’ Out by Joe Jackson while driving in Manhattan at night. The song simply does not work for me well when listening to it on a tropical beach taking in the rays of the sun, however. The 1982 song Steppin’ Out was purposely created with the mood of going out on the town in Manhattan at night — but there are also songs which evoke memories for me even though those memories may have nothing to do with the meaning of the song intended by the artist. An example for me would be the 1975 album Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy by Elton John, which was intended to be an autobiographical account of how Elton John and lyricist Bernie Taupin became successful from their humble beginnings in England in the late 1960s. The flight to Paris aboard an airplane operated by Air France was to be the first time I had ever left the North American continent. Concerned about spending several boring hours on the flight, I asked a friend if I could borrow his portable cassette player which operated on batteries, recorded some of his albums on several cassette tapes, and off I went to Europe for a month to take a course in photography in which I earned credits for college. The guitar opening by Davey Johnstone of first song from the album — which also happens to be the title song — reminds me of when the aircraft departed from the gate at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York and slowly taxied towards the runway. To this day, that guitar “solo” — accompanied by the electric keyboarding of Elton John and the modest percussion by Nigel Olsson — still evokes that feeling of embarking on a long trip; the leaving of family and friends and the way of life to which I was used mixed with the excitement of being in a land far, far away. The adrenaline flowed as the wheels turned while the aircraft slowly lumbered towards the runway. It was an amazing feeling. After Tower of Babel, the song Bitter Fingers played as the aircraft approaches the runway. The aircraft departed on the runway at precisely the moment the second chorus began — a feat of timing I still find incredible to this day — and to this day, the second chorus of Bitter Fingers evokes the energy of the aircraft as the engines are fully throttled, launching the airplane towards the speed required to take off into the air. The last part of Bitter Fingers perfectly synchronizes with the aircraft banking towards its flight path as the ground slowly distances itself away — and Tell Me When The Whistle Blows seems to capture the atmospheric equivalent of floating in the air amongst the clouds as the aircraft closes in on its cruising altitude. By the time Someone Saved My Life Tonight began to play, the airplane was at its cruising altitude well above the clouds. The last chorus almost has a gospel feel to it with the dramatic feeling the synthesizer seems to give — as if I was close to heaven. This is when the goose bumps announce their appearance on my body. This song especially works in the middle of an overnight flight. The rest of the album does not have nearly as much of an effect on me as the first part of the album, so I may choose to either play it or skip it for the other songs on my airplane playlist, which includes songs heard by me over the in-flight entertainment systems of flights over the years and made enough of an impression on me to include them on that sp
about 10 hours ago
Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (ABC, 8 p.m.) — Agent Coulson and the S.H.I.E.L.D. team “spring into action after a brilliant scientist is kidnapped,” according to TV Guide. I’m kind of wishing that the show...
Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (ABC, 8 p.m.) — Agent Coulson and the S.H.I.E.L.D. team “spring into action after a brilliant scientist is kidnapped,” according to TV Guide. I’m kind of wishing that the show had a lot more Ming Na and Agent Coulson, and a lot less everyone else. Let us hope that tonight they move past the adventure-of-the-week, and move into a series’ long arc. Frontline (PBS, 9 p.m.) — In “League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis” Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru, investigative reporters for ESPN, make the case that the NFL spent two decades fighting science and trying to cover up the long-term effects that concussions have on the brain. Brooklyn Nine-Nine (Fox, 8:30 p.m.) — Audiences seem to be a little conflicted about Andy Samberg’s show: They either like it already, or like the unrealized potential. I fall into the latter camp. Good news, though: Despite low ratings, Fox has ordered more scripts, so we may get to see if that unrealized potential comes to fruition. New Girl (Fox, 9 p.m.) — I kind of dig where this season is heading, especially with tonight’s episode in which Schmidt tries to break up Jess and Nick in retaliation for outing him last week to both of his girlfriends. THAT’S DARK. The Goldbergs (ABC, 9 p.m.) — My favorite part of this show so far is the button at the end of each episode, where series creator Adam Goldberg shows actual video-camera footage of his family in the 1980s. It hits me right in the heart-spot. Trophy Wife (ABC, 9:30) — I really want this show to be better, just for Bradley Whitford’s sake. He deserves a series that isn’t cancelled after 13 episodes. Sons of Anarchy (FX, 10 p.m.) — It’s another super-sized episode, which is driving me batty. Tuesday night is already crowded enough without the extra half hour tacked on to each episode. TV Guide offers no description of tonight’s episode, but “Mad King” is the title. Given what happened in last week’s bloodbath, I’m excited to see how it plays out. LATE NIGHT LISTINGS: Seth Meyers, who will soon take over the show that David Letterman started, is on Letterman tonight; Leno has Billy Crystal; Elton John is on Kimmel; Sarah Michelle Gellar, is on Ferguson; Miley Cyrus is on Fallon; and Paul Giamatti stops by the Colbert Report.
about 21 hours ago
Gravity, you say? Even spacier than the calamatious Sandra Bullock film current burning up theatres: that gold-lamé TV movie that hit earth over the weekend. House of Versace. On Lifetime. About the trials and tribulations of a modest So...
Gravity, you say? Even spacier than the calamatious Sandra Bullock film current burning up theatres: that gold-lamé TV movie that hit earth over the weekend. House of Versace. On Lifetime. About the trials and tribulations of a modest Southern Italian clan that morphed into a story of murder, genius, family strife, the invention of the ’90s-era “supermodels” and the ladling itself of a still-stirs recipe of celebrity and fashion. Meeting the minimum expectations of a Lifetime concoction — it airs again on the channel, Wednesday eve at 8 p.m. — it errs on the side of camp, and has lines that one might expect of such a production. “I want it in canary yellow!” “If you’re going to put me on a leash, it better be diamond-studded!” “Stupid moon, what would it do if the sun went out?” Sinking her teeth into the starring role: Gina Gershon, as Donatella. Naturally, I ate it up. This, even though I’ve read the book it’s based on — Deborah Ball’s masterful picking-apart of a family and a time — and know it doesn’t even come close to re-enacting its true operatic excess. (There is a scene, though, in the flick in which, after Gianni’s brutal fresco murder on Ocean Drive, Puccini’s Tosca plays, and his sister looks forlornly into the distance.) That this TV trifle merely glides over Gianni’s funeral, in 1997, is perhaps the most hair-pulling-out travesty. The mother of all fashion funerals, and staged with Cecil B. Demille precision, it was at the Duomo, in Milan, and an entire movie could be made just about it. Yes, Princess Diana was there, sitting beside Elton John — as the movie finger-points — but directly behind them was Karl Lagerfeld, who was Gianni’s friend, and Giorgio Armani, who really wasn’t. Slipping out of the pews, at one point: John and Sting. Time to do a duet a psalm — and as Ball’s book pointed out, this being the Duomo, the 78-year-old priest who ran things had demanded that the two pop icons audition before he’d give them permission to sing. Model-like men dressed in black Versace suits had been deployed to escort notables to their seats, including Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy, who would be dead the next year. Di, whose time was also limited — her own demise would come in just six weeks — famously shed her jacket halfway through the mass, unaware she was breaking the church’s no-go, re: uncovered skin. Meanwhile, supermodel Naomi Campbell — who was unconsolable — covered up grandly, with a voluminous dark veil falling to her shoulders. I could go on. There were several questions I had while watching House of Versace. For one: Hey, what’s Pierre Trudeau doing talking to Donatella Versace? With our own Colm Feore cast in the role of business-minded Santo Versace — the other surviving Versace sibling — I kept getting flashbacks of his role as the pirouetting PM in that old CBC miniseries. (Indeed, in this telling, two of three Versaces are Canadian, it turns out, with our Enrico Colantoni essaying the role — doomed! — of Gianni himself.) The English-ness only seemed to emphasize how little the film understands, really, about the very Italian-ness of this clan Some other questions: How is it possible to tell this story without setting a scene at the Versace villa at Villa Fontanelle, the glamour ground zero on Lake Como that Gianni bought and had Queen Elizabeth’s landscaper brought in to whip its gardens? Or, for that matter: How is this saga complete with nary a mention of that barely there green frock worn by Jennifer Lopez to the Grammy’s that one year? (Phew … the film does, at the very least, have a throwaway line to Versace’s famed “safety-pin” dress that Elizabeth Hurley wore back in 1994 — a dress that’d go on in fashion her-story!) Filippo Monforte/AFP/Getty ImagesThe real Donatella, at Versace's Spring/Summer 2014 runway show in Milan on Sept. 20, 2013. But … wait … why aren’t these Calabrians speaking Italian to one another at the dinner table? That was, perhaps, my numero uno-est
about 22 hours ago
We started discussing halloween costumes back in July this year. We went around and around and finally decided on a Wizard of Oz theme for our family costumes. I’ll share more on that later, but for now, if you’re needing a l...
We started discussing halloween costumes back in July this year. We went around and around and finally decided on a Wizard of Oz theme for our family costumes. I’ll share more on that later, but for now, if you’re needing a little inspiration before the end of the month, check out some of my favorite kid costumes from around the internet: Popcorn Vendors The cast of Duck Dynasty Dumb and Dumber Treasure Troll (I couldn’t find a source for this one) Wayne’s World Mr. Peanut Prince Humpty Dumpty Popeye Rainbow And while this isn’t a kid costume, it wouldn’t be a favorite halloween costume line up without Elton John Cat. What are your little ones planning to be for halloween this year? Love, M
about 22 hours ago
I've said it numerous times before, but it really, really makes my day, when I pick a random track from a random promo mail and then gets completely knocked off my feet. Happened today when I checked fresh single On The Avenue by fairly ...
I've said it numerous times before, but it really, really makes my day, when I pick a random track from a random promo mail and then gets completely knocked off my feet. Happened today when I checked fresh single On The Avenue by fairly new Australian trio Major Tom, which since then has been on continuous repeat. The track is an irresistible, charming and close to perfect 70's inspired piano-pop song getting quite some inspiration from (without ripping off) Elton John and (so they say) Ben Folds. SoundCloud doesn't seem to be working today, so instead you'll have to enjoy (and enjoy it you should) the track via this bandcamp link. On The Avenue by Major Tom And the SoundCloud widget which seems to be working again (the reason was probably some problem with my fucked up computer! Yes! It's new, but still pretty fucked up!).
1 day ago
“I am a late bloomer when it comes to collecting vinyl. I was inspired by my friends and how they would talk about it being addictive and once you start, you can’t stop.” “When I was a kid my mother and father both had ...
“I am a late bloomer when it comes to collecting vinyl. I was inspired by my friends and how they would talk about it being addictive and once you start, you can’t stop.” “When I was a kid my mother and father both had a vinyl collection. I use to go through their collection and pick which ones were my mom’s and which ones were my dad’s. My parents grew up in the ’70s and they both listened to completely different music. My mother listened to a lot of disco, pop, and country/folk music. Her collection consisted of records like Elton John, David Bowie, Donny Osmond, The Beatles (earlier Beatles), Paul McCartney & Wings, Donna Summer, Linda Ronstadt, and Dan Hill. My father’s music taste was geared to psychedelic rock and his collection consisted of April Wine, Led Zeppelin, Aerosmith, The Who, The Guess Who, Ye,s and The Rolling Stones. My first vinyl was a gift, and that was Joan Jett’s I Love Rock n Roll, and that is where the addiction began. From hunting for that rare vinyl as a tactile experience, to the amazing sound you hear on a record player that no CD player could make. I continue to collect as we speak, with my most recent purchase being an older album I would listen to as a teenager, The Flatliners The Great Awake. CD’s that I grew with are now on vinyl, and I can relive the experience with a completely different sound.” —Mary Deth “I never really grew up around vinyl. I think my uncle had a few records kicking around but that’s about it. It wasn’t until I was about 18 when I really started getting into vinyl.” “I started listening more to Joan Jett (who started my obsession with collecting records) and bands like the Ramones, and the Sex Pistols. Those simple yet inspiring artists and bands really had a big influence on my taste in music and playing style. I collect mostly Joan Jett & The Blackheart stuff and the Runaways. I love how much warmer vinyl sounds, and just so raw, no b.s… It’s just all out there for you to hear. That’s what I love about vinyl.” —Lindsay The Anti-Queens debut EP “Grow Up/Stay Young” is available now. The Anti-Queens Facebook | Twitter | Bandcamp The post The Anti-Queens: The TVD First Date appeared first on The Vinyl District.
2 days ago
Men
Show business, known to outsiders as cruel and insiders as especially cruel, gives her greatest gifts to those who can conquer her most toilsome challenges. She is a mountain – one nearly impossible to climb, but even harder to stay at h...
Show business, known to outsiders as cruel and insiders as especially cruel, gives her greatest gifts to those who can conquer her most toilsome challenges. She is a mountain – one nearly impossible to climb, but even harder to stay at her peak once done. Consistent relevance in the public eye has proven elusive to even the most talented of entertainers, and those who achieve it represent such a small portion of the performer pool that it eventually becomes systematically proficient at draining the said pool. Few acts have exhibited the remarkable staying power of Elton John and Bernie Taupin, who gaze down on a different type of pool on their newest record The Diving Board. Coming 43 years after their first hit “Your Song” in 1970, they’ve since made over 30 records together that have sold over 300 million copies – including 7 consecutive number-one albums, 9 number-one hits, 6 Grammy Awards, and a Rock & Roll Hall of Fame induction for Elton. They are one of the five most successful music acts of all-time. But early in his career, Elton John, as so many singer/songwriters are, was plagued with an identity crisis. While fellow introvert Bernie could write and hide behind the scenes, Elton was on the public stage, where the last person he wanted his audience to see was himself. He was shy and unimposing, and as we later learned, also repressing his sexuality. So, shoved into the spotlight, he hid in his own way – in outrageous outfits, lavish jewelry and his trademark immoderate glasses. Elton’s eccentric costumes were in direct contrast to Bernie’s often dark and fearful lyrics. His music played along to Bernie’s anxiety and naivety on their first few records, but eventually became more chart-focused than introspective, and Elton’s stage alter-ego could survive. His identity issues would later take their toll, when his drug use became so excessive he had several encounters with the brink of death. Elton always wanted it both ways as a performer – he asked us to take his often somber songs seriously while he paraded on stage with irreverent profligacy. He asked us to accept him as a global superstar when he clearly couldn’t accept himself as one. He asked us to grant him an exception to the artist’s paradox, for he was unwilling to choose between indulgence and authenticity. Because of the music, and only the music, we agreed to meet Elton’s demands. Along with Bernie’s lyrics, the songs had a rare ability to make us feel like we were flying with the new while simultaneously being grounded with what we could relate to. And now, listening to The Diving Board, it sounds like Elton and Bernie truly understand the meaning of their journey. It is the most organic and bittersweet Elton John record since Tumbleweed Connection – “A Town Called Jubilee” could fit on either album – and Elton himself has never been more featured on a record. Several of the tracks are just Elton and his piano; in fact the record even has three shorter instrumental piano tracks. T-Bone Burnett’s masterful production fingerprints are everywhere. The spotlight, once on outlandish fashion shows or month-long drug binges, now shines back where it started: Elton and his piano. But the record, while certainly reflective, seems in many ways to be looking ahead. There is a palpable sense of discomfort that at times borders on defeat; neither Elton nor Bernie appear to be satisfied with where they stand, despite acknowledging they’re further along now than they once were. The Western melodies on “Oscar Wilde Gets Out” and “The Ballad of Blind Tom” sound as though the duo is readying for battle or preparing to face an ostensibly expected sentence. Elton is not the songwriter he once was, but he sounds as accepting of that as ever. Some of the melodies are indeed too ambitious, but they are never spurious. Bernie, as usual, is on top of his game and his maturity shines: “All you need is a candlelit bed
2 days ago