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Cheery blogger @KayLinaBrown reviews the latest touring performance to grace the stage at the first direct arena.
Cheery blogger @KayLinaBrown reviews the latest touring performance to grace the stage at the first direct arena.
about 5 hours ago
The critic of today's art is ironically its biggest benefactor: Perry has taken a fifth-rate talent and made himself an old masterIn the great game of contemporary art, Grayson Perry is a master. He has perfected the move that trumps all...
The critic of today's art is ironically its biggest benefactor: Perry has taken a fifth-rate talent and made himself an old masterIn the great game of contemporary art, Grayson Perry is a master. He has perfected the move that trumps all others: denouncing the art world from within. His Reith lectures, to be broadcast on Radio 4 later this month, reportedly lay bare the cynical workings of 21st-century art. He's in the papers today mocking his bete noire, Damien Hirst, and claiming that the avant garde art is no longer subversive because the entire bourgeoisie love it.The joke, of course, is obvious. The favourite contemporary artist of that same bourgeoisie is … Grayson Perry. He is loved by Today-listening folk for his wit and perceptive comments and has done more than anyone else to make art a mainstream part of issue-debating, educated, middle-class British culture, Guardian or Telegraph reading. He's the toast of book festivals, the darling of museums.The blunt fact, however, is that Perry owes his success entirely to a sloppy contemporary confusion about what art is. Art can be anything. Artists don't need to be skilled. Cultural impact matters more than innate creativity. All these glib ideas that were thrown like bombs by Damien Hirst 25 years ago and popularised by the Turner prize have made it possible for Perry to turn an incredibly slight talent into national stardom.As a potter he's fifth-rate and as a graphic artist he's got a forced and repetitive line. But above all, there is a stale rationality to his art that irks me. He is always satirising, always making a point.Where is the madness and strangeness and imagination that takes art beyond the obvious?Perry is a mediocre muddle of an artist – yet mediocre muddle is apparently what modern Britain admires. No one could look at his work and dream of applying the word "genius" to it. Surely we can agree on that? You might call his tapestries "clever", "hilarious", "perceptive" – but you would not say "genius".You might say that's irrelevant, that good art does not have to be "genius" art. But if art cannnot make you wonder, at least for a moment, if it is a work of genius, then it is not worth bothering with. Such waffling art will suddenly look like crap in 10, 20 or 100 years. Only fashion is disguising its futility.Grayson Perry truly is a phenomenon of our times – a pundit whose punditry is underwritten by a spurious claim to be a serious artist. He's succeeded in becoming the anti-Hirst, the voice of everyone who loathes Hirst's emptiness. But two wrongs don't make a right, and two bad artists don't make a good one.Perry says art can't shock us any more. Of course it can – if it is truly original and creative. But Grayson Perry is never going to produce that kind of art. He never has. He inhabits a bizarre British realm of art as conversation piece, as intellectual decoration: no magic, no mystery, just a lot of banter.Grayson PerryArtCeramicsJonathan Jonestheguardian.com © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds
about 7 hours ago
TV YouTube is awash with legally dubious uploads, but some companies, notably BBC Worldwise who upload whole programmes themselves for promotional purposes. All3Media is another one. Find on their YouTube channel whole drama ser...
TV YouTube is awash with legally dubious uploads, but some companies, notably BBC Worldwise who upload whole programmes themselves for promotional purposes. All3Media is another one. Find on their YouTube channel whole drama series of varying vintages most of which haven't been released onto the home market or subscription services. Here they are with descriptive quotes from Wikipedia because I'm being lazy: "The Palace was a British drama television series that aired on ITV in 2008. Produced by Company Pictures for the ITV network, it was created by Tom Grieves and follows a fictional British Royal Family in the aftermath of the death of King James III and the succession of his 24-year-old son, Richard IV, played by Rupert Evans. It also stars Jane Asher and Zoe Telford. The series was filmed on location in Lithuania in 2007 and broadcast from January to March 2008. It was axed after one series due to low viewing figures." Serious & Organised doesn't have a Wikipedia page. The YouTube page says: "Martin Kemp in his first series role since leaving Eastenders, stars as a detective in the Serious and Organised squad. The National Serious and Organised Crime Unit is charged with dealing with the most dangerous and professional criminals in Great Britain: crime families, Triads, gangland killings, extortion; major drug suppliers." "P.O.W. was a television series consisting of 6 episodes, broadcast on ITV in 2003. The series starred James D'Arcy and Joe Absolom. The drama series is based on true stories[citation needed], set in Germany in the year 1940 and follows the character of Jim Caddon as he is captured after his plane crashes during a bombing raid over Normandy. In contrast to previous entries in the World War Two prison escape genre such as The Colditz Story, it concentrated on escape attempts by other ranks rather than officers. The series was filmed in Lithuania and first broadcast on television on 10 October 2003. A second series has not been commissioned, though ITV followed it with several other World War Two dramas including Colditz and Island at War. The title "P.O.W." stands for "prisoner of war"." Note: the above playlist needs editing a bit. Have emailed them. "Rose and Maloney is a British television crime drama starring Sarah Lancashire and Phil Davis as Rose Linden and Maloney, two investigators working for the fictional Criminal Justice Review Agency. This agency takes on claims of miscarriages of justice, assessing whether there are grounds to reopen old cases. Rose is brilliant but strong-willed and sometimes reckless. She likes to follow her instincts and play hunches and often comes into conflict with authority. Maloney, although Rose's superior, usually allows himself to be led by his more passionate colleague. Maloney is a by-the-book man and a little grey. He finds working with Rose dangerous but addictively exciting. A pilot was first broadcast on ITV on 29 September 2002. A series of three stories followed in July 2005." Guardian The Queen. From YouTube: "For the very first time cameras have been allowed behind the scenes at the royal palaces to see the historic and hidden world of the Grenadier Guards." Again, from YouTube: "WILLIAM'S WOMEN takes a light-hearted look at the world of royal dating. From the plusses to the pitfalls the programme takes a look at an area that is fraught with complications." All3Media list also has loads of other channels listed here, but most of them just contain clips or Gordon Ramsey. Or both.
about 12 hours ago
On Friday 11 October, at All Hallows Church, The Coopers will headline the Love Music Leeds’ eagerly awaited album launch, supported by well-known Leeds artists, Harry George Johns and Jasmine Kennedy. Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foun...
On Friday 11 October, at All Hallows Church, The Coopers will headline the Love Music Leeds’ eagerly awaited album launch, supported by well-known Leeds artists, Harry George Johns and Jasmine Kennedy. Leeds and York Partnership NHS Foundation Trust have worked with Rich Huxley and Ed Waring, from Hope and Social, to produce an album of songs nominated by people with experience of mental ill-health, or who are affected by it in their personal or professional lives.
about 14 hours ago
Detail from 'Portrait of Amalie Zuckerkandl', 1917-18 by Gustav Klimt © Belvedere, Vienna Donated by Vita and Gustav Künstler Facing the Modern - The Portrait in Vienna 1900 opens to the public... [[ This is a content summary o...
Detail from 'Portrait of Amalie Zuckerkandl', 1917-18 by Gustav Klimt © Belvedere, Vienna Donated by Vita and Gustav Künstler Facing the Modern - The Portrait in Vienna 1900 opens to the public... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
about 19 hours ago
SATURDAY 19TH OCTOBER 2013 CELEBRATING SUBVERSION: THE ANTI-CAPITALIST ROADSHOW Liverpool Acoustic, in association with News From Nowhere and Radical Liverpool, are proud to present the triumphant return of Celebrating Subversion: The An...
SATURDAY 19TH OCTOBER 2013 CELEBRATING SUBVERSION: THE ANTI-CAPITALIST ROADSHOW Liverpool Acoustic, in association with News From Nowhere and Radical Liverpool, are proud to present the triumphant return of Celebrating Subversion: The Anti-Capitalist Roadshow, a very special evening of music on Saturday 19th October 2013 at Sefton Park Palm House. Last year’s performance saw Sefton Park Palm House bulging at the seams, with extra chairs and benches being drafted in to accommodate the numbers. The appreciative audience enjoyed a spirit-raising night of music and magic with Robb Johnson, Grace Petrie, Janet Russell, Jim Woodland, Ian Saville, and Roy Bailey. This year the lineup for the Liverpool show confirmed as:- Leon Rosselson Roy Bailey Frankie Armstrong Reem Kelani Jim Woodland Sandra Kerr is sadly unable to attend but her place is being ably filled by Roy Bailey. Roy has performed with Leon Rosselson and Frankie Armstrong many times over the past 40 years, and they’re all looking forward to renewing their musical partnership and friendship once more, this time on stage in Liverpool. According to chief mischief-maker Leon Rosselson, the Anti-Capitalist Roadshow was created… “…to raise spirits and give hope and cheer and a smile or two to those angry at the ideologically driven austerity programme imposed by this millionaire government on all but the elite, and in particular on the poor, the vulnerable and the disabled. We are part of the resistance to a capitalism that functions only on behalf of the wealthy, that aims to shrink the public sphere and privatise public services, including the NHS, and that is destructive to the planet. We are part of another way of looking at the world.” Event: Celebrating Subversion: The Anti-Capitalist Roadshow Artists: Leon Rosselson, Roy Bailey, Frankie Armstrong, Reem Kelani, Jim Woodland Date: Saturday 19th October 2013 Times: Doors 7pm, start 7.30pm, finish 10.30pm Venue: Sefton Park Palm House Tickets: £10 (£6 unwaged) online – wegottickets.com/liverpoolacoustic (booking fee) in person – News From Nowhere, Bold St Liverpool Acoustic Spotlight 100 To play click the player above or right click Spotlight 100 to download for free If you’re an acoustic musician from the Greater Merseyside area, or from further afield but play on the Liverpool scene, then feel free to send us your music for future shows. We can’t promise we’ll be able to play everything that’s sent to us, but we will listen to every track. Find out all about the show, how to submit your music, and the Terms of Use, at liverpoolacoustic.co.uk/spotlight/about All tracks are taken from the double album ‘Celebrating Subversion: The Anti-Capitalist Roadshow’ available to buy online and (better still) from News From Nowhere. 1. Robb Johnson - Be Reasonable 2. Leon Rosselson – Looters 3. Roy Bailey – Blood and Roses 4. Frankie Armstrong – My Personal Revenge 5. Reem Kelani – Song of the Olive Tree 6. Jim Woodland – The Grapes of Wrath LEON ROSSELSON leonrosselson.co.uk Leon Rosselson was at the forefront of the 1960s folk revival as a member of the Galliards, and has survived more than five decades of songwriting, from That Was The Week That Was and the satire boom of the sparky sixties to the curdled present, evoking the spirit of the times through song and story, with songs ranging from the lyrical to the satirical, from the personal to the political, from the humorous to the poignant. Over the years Leon has worked alongside Martin Carthy, Roy Bailey, Frankie Armstrong, Dave Swarbrick, and Robb Johnson, and his songs have been covered by Billy Bragg and the Oyster Band, Roy Bailey, and Eliza Carthy. In addition to his life in music, Leon is also the author of 17 children’s books. “…a unique songwriter. I do not think there is anyone in the English speaking world to touch him. The man is a songwritin
about 23 hours ago
Music For completion sake, YouTube channel Reload Sessions have uploaded three performances from MKS, a cover version of Lorde's Royals, the really strong No Regrets from the new album and for group historians Caught In A Moment from Th...
Music For completion sake, YouTube channel Reload Sessions have uploaded three performances from MKS, a cover version of Lorde's Royals, the really strong No Regrets from the new album and for group historians Caught In A Moment from Three with Siobhan covering Heidi's bits in that slightly triumphant way she has.
about 23 hours ago
I find babies hilarious. They pass gas shamelessly, smear food all over their faces with glee and pride, are more often than not disproportionately obese. They also revel in being naked with the same enthusiasm I usually reserve for, wel...
I find babies hilarious. They pass gas shamelessly, smear food all over their faces with glee and pride, are more often than not disproportionately obese. They also revel in being naked with the same enthusiasm I usually reserve for, well, being naked. Having learnt that trying to pick up the babies of strangers in public [...]
1 day ago
Don't be put off by the skin-tight trousers and women acting as furniture – this star of British pop art was deeply skeptical about the swinging 60sAllen Jones is an easy artist to dismiss. In 2013 his images of women look regressive, to...
Don't be put off by the skin-tight trousers and women acting as furniture – this star of British pop art was deeply skeptical about the swinging 60sAllen Jones is an easy artist to dismiss. In 2013 his images of women look regressive, to put it mildly. His 1969 work Chair is currently on view in the Tate exhibtion Art Under Attack, and plenty of visitors will sympathise with the feminist who once attacked this sculpture of a woman in high-heeled boots offering herself as a seat.Yet, in his day, Jones was an artistic radical with a cool intellectual agenda. He's one of the stars of When Britain Went Pop!, a survey of the birth of British pop art at Christies' new gallery in Mayfair. His painting, First Step, in this show is, like Chair, so blatantly fetishistic that to say it objectifies women is a tautology: that is clearly what it sets out to do. Why?The answer may come as a surprise to those who think the British discovered Marcel Duchamp in 1988 when a young Damien Hirst got lost in the Tate Gallery, wondered why the loo he was using was in a public place, and after a nasty scene learned he'd chanced on the art of the readymade.Allen Jones was a Duchampian before the Hirst generation were even born. His art is an icy joke about the power of desire: it pays homage to Duchamp's ironic view of human culture as a masturbatory machine in his most ambitious work, The Bride Stripped Bare By Her Bachelors, Even.In the early 1960s, Duchamp was the inspiration for a British artistic revolution. The leader of this movement and arguably the man who invented "pop" was Richard Hamilton – teacher, writer, painter and printmaker. Hamilton was an expert on Duchamp. He studied and "typotranslated" the Frenchman's complex notes, and created a replica of The Bride Stripped Bare so accurate Duchamp signed it as his work. This is the version the Tate owns.Nowadays, it is Duchamp's urinal that's held up as an artistic inspiration for its bold statement that anything can be art. In 1960s Britain, however, it was the more complex allegory of The Bride Stripped Bare that struck artists as a brilliantly ironic portrait of modern life. It imagines the modern world as a consumerist cat-and-mouse game of endlessly frustrated desire.As the consumer revolution got underway in Britain, and a new world of longing was opened up by TV and pop music, pop art portrayed the new age as a tantalising Duchampian comedy. Richard Hamilton's Hommage a Chrysler Corp slyly satirises the seduction of machines, while Jones gives the new sexual freedoms of the age a cynical absurdity.British pop art is intelligent and ironic, and deeply skeptical about all it seems to celebrate. Its anthem, after all, is I can't get no satisfaction.Marcel DuchampArtPaintingSculptureTate BritainExhibitionsJonathan Jonestheguardian.com © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds
1 day ago
Where does the North begin and end? Phil Dean heads to the Ilkley Lit Fest to hear Paul Morley talk about his new book The North
Where does the North begin and end? Phil Dean heads to the Ilkley Lit Fest to hear Paul Morley talk about his new book The North
1 day ago