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Hold me closer, Tiny Death Star...Disney's upcoming mobile game will turn the Star Wars universe and the dark side into 8-bit cuteness. They're vague on the specifics, but will say this: ...join Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader on a mis...
Hold me closer, Tiny Death Star...Disney's upcoming mobile game will turn the Star Wars universe and the dark side into 8-bit cuteness. They're vague on the specifics, but will say this: ...join Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader on a mission to attract Galactic bitizens, run intergalactic businesses, and build an all-new Death Star. Construct unique Star Wars themed locations to attract iconic characters and species to your space station in this 8-bit style game. That's no moon...that's an ass I'll want to kiss if this turns out to be decent. Meesa could be in big dudu now. h/t 10glfan59
about 2 hours ago
An anonymous reader writes "The South African Education Department has effectively banned the use of FOSS software in state-run schools by forcing all candidates writing the Computer Applications Technology examination to use Microsoft's...
An anonymous reader writes "The South African Education Department has effectively banned the use of FOSS software in state-run schools by forcing all candidates writing the Computer Applications Technology examination to use Microsoft's Office 2010 or 2013 as the only supported options. In the same circular, the state has mandated that all schools use Delphi, instead of Java, as the programming language for the country's Information Technology practical paper. South Africa, notorious for its poor performance in Maths and Science and for having vastly over-crowded and underfunded schools, are now locked into costly Microsoft licensing because of this decision." Read more of this story at Slashdot.
about 2 hours ago
By Charles J Baserap After a rather low key (Hah!  “Low key.”  “Loki.”  I kill me.) sophomore episode last week, Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is back with a bang for its third episode, The Asset, and it seems some of the kinks fr...
By Charles J Baserap After a rather low key (Hah!  “Low key.”  “Loki.”  I kill me.) sophomore episode last week, Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is back with a bang for its third episode, The Asset, and it seems some of the kinks from last week are still working themselves out, while others have been more or less taken care of, which is definitely a good thing. We open the episode with a tractor trailer on an empty stretch of road that really reminded me of my time in boot camp out in Artesia, New Mexico—plenty of nothing on all sides, and the unshakable feeling that it’s only a matter of time before your car’s engine goes out and you’re abducted by aliens who wish to do unspeakable acts to your nether regions—and we don’t have to wait very long before the truck is revealed as a S.H.I.E.L.D. transport, the first tip off being the car in front of it getting mysteriously lifted up into the air and then slammed back down to the ground.  Man. And I thought a lot of vehicles got wrecked when I was reviewing Smallville. Anyway, receiving instructions to protect “the package” at all costs, the driver does his best to watch out for further danger but he and his entire vehicle suffer the same fate and once the truck has been put down, armed troops swoop in to relieve it of said package, in this case not some secret weapon or technological wonder, but physicist Franklin Hall (played by Ian Hart).  That name sound familiar? Unless you're a long time nerd like me, probably not.  But don't worry.  I’ll fill you in as we go. Read more »
about 3 hours ago
One of the biggest frustrations for cord cutters is they cannot get premium TV shows from HBO or Showtime. Well, HBO has changed that (in a way). Shows like Game of Thrones, the Newsroom, True Blood and more will be found on Google Play ...
One of the biggest frustrations for cord cutters is they cannot get premium TV shows from HBO or Showtime. Well, HBO has changed that (in a way). Shows like Game of Thrones, the Newsroom, True Blood and more will be found on Google Play starting at $1.99 per episode. You can even get full seasons at $19. HBO said this was just the beginning of their partnership with Google Play. According to an article on Engadget, they plan to put more content up soon – including older shows and documentaries. A la carte options are very similar to what iTunes does. I used to get all my episodes of Mad Men and Breaking Bad for $35. Only downfall is I would have to wait 24 hours for the shows to be uploaded and cataloged in iTunes. This also doesn’t void any contracts with cable companies. HBO will be rolling this out in the coming months.
about 3 hours ago
Staff on the International Space Station hope to raise a toast to a sixth grader in December. That’s because they’ll be carrying out an experiment proposed by Michal Bodzianowski, who won a national science contest for childr...
Staff on the International Space Station hope to raise a toast to a sixth grader in December. That’s because they’ll be carrying out an experiment proposed by Michal Bodzianowski, who won a national science contest for children. He’s among 11 pupils who’ll have the chance to have their experiments carried out in space through a competition run by the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education. The Denver Post explains that Bodzianowski got the idea after reading that people in the Middle Ages drank beer rather than water because the fermentation process killed bacteria. He put together a proposal to test whether it’s possible to brew in a microgravity setting. According to Bodzianowski, if that proves the case, then brewing could be a back-up option if the water supply on a spacecraft becomes polluted. With even a traditional microbrewery too bulky for the ISS, where space (and mass) is at a premium, Bodzianowski proposed a very small scale test. It will use a six-inch silicon tube divided up by a series of clasps. The tube will be filled with water, malted barley, hops and yeast. Once in space, the ISS crew will remove the clamps and shake the tube to mix the ingredients and see if it turns to beer. Meanwhile Bodzianowski will repeat the experiment with identical equipment back on Earth. Bodzianowski’s teacher Sharon Combs says his work, which was originally designed solely for a school project, is a perfect lesson on why kids need to learn the process of writing lab reports that might one day become the basis of real proposals. According to the Denver Post, however, winning has come at a price. Although the prize gave Bodzianowski the opportunity to have the experiment run in space, that actually happening was subject to the school raising $21,500 towards the cost of the flight to the ISS, which is being run by commercial firm Nanorocks. That sure makes for an expensive beer.
about 3 hours ago
Cryptstagram is an online tool that allows users to upload images and encrypt them with secret messages that only the intended recipients can see.
Cryptstagram is an online tool that allows users to upload images and encrypt them with secret messages that only the intended recipients can see.
about 3 hours ago
ananyo writes "One day, computers may be able to simulate exactly how enzymes, ion channels, viruses, DNA and other complex biological molecules react with each other inside a cell. And if such a software package is ever written, it will...
ananyo writes "One day, computers may be able to simulate exactly how enzymes, ion channels, viruses, DNA and other complex biological molecules react with each other inside a cell. And if such a software package is ever written, it will owe its development to three researchers who today won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Martin Karplus, of Harvard University and the University of Strasbourg, Michael Levitt, of Stanford University, and Arieh Warshel, of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Starting in the 1970s — working with computers far less powerful than today's smartphones — the three theorists made advances in computer modeling that laid the foundations for modern software used to simulate protein folding, design drugs and even artificial enzymes, and understand the workings of complex catalysts. In essence, says Sven Lidin, the chairman of the Nobel committee, they 'took the chemical experiment to cyberspace.'" Read more of this story at Slashdot.
about 3 hours ago
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Ed Felton writes about an incident, in 2003, in which someone tried to backdoor the Linux kernel. Back in 2003 Linux used BitKeeper to store the master copy of the Linux source code. If a developer wanted to ...
Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes "Ed Felton writes about an incident, in 2003, in which someone tried to backdoor the Linux kernel. Back in 2003 Linux used BitKeeper to store the master copy of the Linux source code. If a developer wanted to propose a modification to the Linux code, they would submit their proposed change, and it would go through an organized approval process to decide whether the change would be accepted into the master code. But some people didn't like BitKeeper, so a second copy of the source code was kept in CVS. On November 5, 2003, Larry McAvoy noticed that there was a code change in the CVS copy that did not have a pointer to a record of approval. Investigation showed that the change had never been approved and, stranger yet, that this change did not appear in the primary BitKeeper repository at all. Further investigation determined that someone had apparently broken in electronically to the CVS server and inserted a small change to wait4: 'if ((options == (__WCLONE|__WALL)) && (current->uid = 0)) ...' A casual reading makes it look like innocuous error-checking code, but a careful reader would notice that, near the end of the first line, it said '= 0' rather than '== 0' so the effect of this code is to give root privileges to any piece of software that called wait4 in a particular way that is supposed to be invalid. In other words it's a classic backdoor. We don't know who it was that made the attempt—and we probably never will. But the attempt didn't work, because the Linux team was careful enough to notice that that this code was in the CVS repository without having gone through the normal approval process. 'Could this have been an NSA attack? Maybe. But there were many others who had the skill and motivation to carry out this attack,' writes Felton. 'Unless somebody confesses, or a smoking-gun document turns up, we'll never know.'" Read more of this story at Slashdot.
about 4 hours ago
A friend of mine just sent this awesome new web series to me, and I just had to share it with you guys. Tumbleweed is at episode 3 right now, so I’ve included all available episodes below for your watching convenience. A gamer star...
A friend of mine just sent this awesome new web series to me, and I just had to share it with you guys. Tumbleweed is at episode 3 right now, so I’ve included all available episodes below for your watching convenience. A gamer starts playing “Tumbleweed,’ the most modern, graphically advanced, video game in history. But his impatient want for violence and sex activates an unexpected feature in this highly advanced game… consequences. Warning: Immature Humor, Inappropriate Language. The content warning right before each episode is a little overkill… for now.
about 4 hours ago
When I first read Ransom Riggs' delicious tale of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children back in 2011, I was completely floored by it. Unlike a lot of YA books out on the market, Miss Peregrine's dealt with the darkness and ...
When I first read Ransom Riggs' delicious tale of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children back in 2011, I was completely floored by it. Unlike a lot of YA books out on the market, Miss Peregrine's dealt with the darkness and horror that its protagonist, Jacob, experienced in a far more literary way than I was accustomed to seeing in the young adult genre (a genre that, let's face it, seems to have jumped ship and become a breeding ground for parasitic paranormal whatwhosits that are neither interesting to read about nor worth the time and money involved in supporting). To say that Miss Peregrine's was different is an understatement. Yes, there was the taste of the paranormal in it, but it was done so cleverly that you didn't really notice it and when it did dawn on you that what you were reading dealt with theories and experiences steeped in the ether tea of an alternate world, you didn't care, because the story was so amazingly detailed and real to you. And don't forget the pictures...oh, those fantastically creepy, yet awesome pictures... So yeah, you could say that I'm a bit stoked that after almost 3 years of waiting for the sequel to come out, there is finally a cover and a release date to keep my fanaticism at level 9 instead of 10. Hollow City (Miss Peregrine's 2) is set to drop on January 14, 2014 and can be pre-ordered HERE if you can't wait to buy it off the shelves come the new year. If you haven't read the first book in what is probably going to become one of your favorite book series (not to mention a movie directed by Tim Burton due out in 2015) then check out the book trailer after the break and/or my review of Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children HERE. Seriously, you're going to love it. Read more »
about 4 hours ago