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A summary of photos posted on flickr today, tagged with “geology.” Displayed below are 49 geology-related photos were added to flickr today. ...
A summary of photos posted on flickr today, tagged with “geology.” Displayed below are 49 geology-related photos were added to flickr today. Similar Posts on Geology News: Daily Geology Photos – October 13 Daily Geology Photos – October 15 Daily Geology Photos – October 24 Daily Geology Photos – October 28 Daily Geology Photos – October 1 The Geology News Blog, 2013. | Permalink | No comments yet | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: Who is linking?
about 3 hours ago
When you've been to a place a few times, it becomes possible to concentrate on the subtle changes that can happen at different parts of the day and under changing weather conditions. We arrived at Lava Beds National Monument on our recen...
When you've been to a place a few times, it becomes possible to concentrate on the subtle changes that can happen at different parts of the day and under changing weather conditions. We arrived at Lava Beds National Monument on our recent field studies journey to the Cascades volcanoes of northern California ahead of the first storm of the season. I wandered out into the lava flows and took in the scene. I was remembering the events here that led to the destruction of a culture more than 140 years ago.The gathering clouds could have been worrisome since we were camping out, but the park staff had generously allowed us to make use of the research center, so we had a warm dry place to retreat to at the end of the day. The rain fell all night, and when the morning arrived, the valley was filled with an ethereal mist. The land was barren and lonely. It was hard to imagine this valley as a home, but for centuries it was indeed home for bands of Native Americans, including the Modoc people.Their presence could be felt in many ways. Our first stop was at Petroglyph Point in an outlier of the Park near the town of Tulelake. The lake once filled most of the valley, and waves used to break at the base of the cliff. The unusual looking rocks are the insides of a tuff cone, a volcanic edifice that formed during a mildly explosive eruption about 270,000 years ago.Several thousand years ago, the people who lived here took canoes and made their way to what was then an island in the midst of the large lake. There they carved numerous petroglyphs, more than 5,000 of them, making this outcrop one of the largest petroglyph panels in the United StatesThe soft tuff was easy to carve, but the softness will be the undoing of these precious marks of the past. The water that filled the lake 140 years ago has been diverted and most of the lake has dried up. Wind now carries sand that blasts against the edge of the cliff, slowly eating away the enigmatic symbols.And there is an even more horrible problem. Fifty of the petroglyphs were vandalized last year, leading to a closure of part of the panel. These are sick people who would do such things.After leaving Petroglyph Point, we arrived at the epicenter of the battleground where the Modoc People lost their homeland and much of their culture. They put up a hell of a fight against impossible odds.The following is an excerpt of an earlier post I wrote about the saga of the Modoc People: The Modoc people had lived in the Klamath Falls-Tule Lake region from time unremembered, and made first contact with Europeans in the 1840's as settlers arrived on the Oregon Trail. Relations between the cultures were rocky and sometimes violent, and eventually the Modoc people were forced to move to the reservation of their ancestral enemies, the Klamath people. After several years of intolerable conditions of neglect, some of the Modocs left the reservation and returned to their homeland on the Lost River near Lava Beds, led by Kientpuash, known to the settlers as Captain Jack. The hostilities began on November 29, 1872. On that day, the U.S. Army tried to round up the Modocs at their Lost River encampment, north of Lava Beds, in order to return them to a reservation in southern Oregon. Shots were fired, both sides suffered injuries, and the Modoc people fled south, led by Kientpuash. A separate party, led by Hooker Jim, went on a rampage, killing 14 settlers. The bands made their way by canoe and horse to the site that came to be known as Captain Jack’s Stronghold. The band included 53 men of fighting age, and about a hundred women, children and aged Modocs.The Stronghold was the site of two major battles and a long siege by U.S. troops and militia of the small band of Modoc peoples during the long winter.The conflicts that took place on this barren surface reveal much about the need to take into account the geology and geography of the battlefield. Although outnumbered at least ten to one, the M
about 12 hours ago
“The explosion of animal life on Earth around 520 million years ago was the result of a combination of interlinked factors rather than a single underlying cause, according to a new study.” Quoted from the University of Oxfor...
“The explosion of animal life on Earth around 520 million years ago was the result of a combination of interlinked factors rather than a single underlying cause, according to a new study.” Quoted from the University of Oxford press release.
about 14 hours ago
MIT researchers have recreated Mars-like conditions within a three-story-tall cloud chamber in Germany, adjusting the chamber’s temperature and relative humidity to match conditions on Mars — essentially forming Martian clouds on Earth. ...
MIT researchers have recreated Mars-like conditions within a three-story-tall cloud chamber in Germany, adjusting the chamber’s temperature and relative humidity to match conditions on Mars — essentially forming Martian clouds on Earth. Quoted from the MIT press release.
about 14 hours ago
Even though the average horizontal natural gas well drilled into the Marcellus Shale had a cost of about $5 million, approximately 78% of them have produced enough gas to become profitable.
Even though the average horizontal natural gas well drilled into the Marcellus Shale had a cost of about $5 million, approximately 78% of them have produced enough gas to become profitable.
about 14 hours ago
“The first ever evidence of a comet entering Earth’s atmosphere and exploding, raining down a shock wave of fire which obliterated every life form in its path, has been discovered by a team of South African scientists and internati...
“The first ever evidence of a comet entering Earth’s atmosphere and exploding, raining down a shock wave of fire which obliterated every life form in its path, has been discovered by a team of South African scientists and international collaborators.” Quoted from the University of Witwatersrand press release.
about 19 hours ago
Four coal-fired power plants in Beijing will be replaced with natural gas units by the end of 2014. The $7.8 billion project will cut 10,000 tons of sulfur dioxide emissions. At the present time, natural gas has a much higher price in ...
Four coal-fired power plants in Beijing will be replaced with natural gas units by the end of 2014. The $7.8 billion project will cut 10,000 tons of sulfur dioxide emissions. At the present time, natural gas has a much higher price in China than it does in the United States.
about 19 hours ago
The new edition of Geoscience Currents by the American Geosciences Institute looks at the “decision points for majoring in the geosciences” of recent graduatese. Fewer than 25% decided on a geoscience major before entering c...
The new edition of Geoscience Currents by the American Geosciences Institute looks at the “decision points for majoring in the geosciences” of recent graduatese. Fewer than 25% decided on a geoscience major before entering college.
about 20 hours ago
I spent most of last week at the Metamorphic Geology Field Symposium in Halland, SW Sweden, and can enthusiastically say that this was the best field trip/short course/conference I have ever attended. The outcrops were stunning, the lect...
I spent most of last week at the Metamorphic Geology Field Symposium in Halland, SW Sweden, and can enthusiastically say that this was the best field trip/short course/conference I have ever attended. The outcrops were stunning, the lectures fascinating, and the discussions engaging. All in all I am very, very inspired to pursue research in metamorphic geology once again. The project I have been working on for the better part of the past two years is tangentially related to metamorphic petrology (the rocks have undergone metamorphism, but that is not terribly relevant to the project goals), and it has been interesting, but from here on out I would like to have my research even more closely aligned with my metamorphic interests. But that is not what I am here to talk to you about.Kyanite eclogite! There is a place in the south west corner of Sweden where there are lenses and layers of kyanite-bearing eclogite within a deformation zone. The zone is, specifically, the Gällared Zone, which, they tell me, is the northeastern most part of the Ullared Deformation zone as defined by Möller et al (1997).Due to the deformation in this area some of the eclogite has been transformed into high temperature mylonitc gneiss, but there are still a number of areas where the eclogite itself has survived. Within these areas are veins where the kyanite is so abundant that instead of being a green-red normal eclogite the rock is a striking blue-red combination that is so beautiful I thought it worth taking the time to put my fingers to keyboard and do some bloging for the first time in months.The field guide for the trip tells me that the presence of kyanite in rocks that have experienced eclogite facies metamorphism indicates that the pressures would have been greater than 15 kbar at a temperature of 700 C, and the paper by Möller (1998) contains a great deal more information about the composition of the various minerals in these rocks and what those compositions mean in terms of the temperature and pressure at which they formed.REFERENCES:Möller , C., Andersson, J., Söderlund, U., and Johansson, L., 1997: A Sveconorwgian deformation zone (system?) within the Eastern Segment, Sveconorwegian orogen of sw Sweden – a first report. GFF 119, 73-78. DOI: 10.1080/11035899709546457 Möller C (1998) Decompressed eclogites in the Sveconorwegian (-Grenvillian) orogen of SW Sweden: petrology and tectonic implications. Journal of Metamorphic Geology 16 (5):641-656
1 day ago
A summary of photos posted on flickr today, tagged with “geology.” Displayed below are 100 geology-related photos were added to flickr today. ...
A summary of photos posted on flickr today, tagged with “geology.” Displayed below are 100 geology-related photos were added to flickr today. Similar Posts on Geology News: Daily Geology Photos – October 13 Daily Geology Photos – October 15 Daily Geology Photos – October 24 Daily Geology Photos – October 28 Daily Geology Photos – October 1 The Geology News Blog, 2013. | Permalink | No comments yet | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: Who is linking?
2 days ago