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California utilities say, ?No batteries for you!? #green
California utilities say, ?No batteries for you!? #green
33 minutes ago
Three ways to make walking to school safer, by @ChangeLabWorks #walktoschoolday
Three ways to make walking to school safer, by @ChangeLabWorks #walktoschoolday
about 1 hour ago
An interesting thing has happened on the way to adulthood for the generation known as the millennials–they’ve become frugal. Previously, millennials–those kids who came of age around the turn of the century (2000)–...
An interesting thing has happened on the way to adulthood for the generation known as the millennials–they’ve become frugal. Previously, millennials–those kids who came of age around the turn of the century (2000)–had been known for their love of brand names, being tech savvy, and acting as if they deserved only the best of everything with everything (read: entitled). But now that these young adults are getting jobs, getting married, and becoming parents, their needs and wants are changing. A recent Advertising Age article, quoting a survey called “Millennials as New Parents” from a Kansas City, Missouri, agency called Barkley, had this to say about millennials: [B]efore millennials have children they over-index on brands like Abercrombie, H&M, Apple, Macy’s and Sephora. After they become parents, those brands not only drop, some of them disappear from their consideration set. Instead, millennials shift to over-indexing against the entire U.S. population on [off-price] brands. This shift in behavior doesn’t surprise this Gen Xer. Before I became a parent, my brand preferences were decidedly upscale. However, once the kids arrived, my mantra became “get the most bang for the buck.” Now that we’re suddenly frugal, that continues to be how I look at everything I buy, regardless of where I shop or what brand I choose. I’ll bet these millennials will continue to be suddenly frugal in how they shop for their families. That same Advertising Age article shared these additional stats about millennials: 9,000 millennial women a day are giving birth — many for the first time. In the next 10 to 15 years, 80% of millenials will be parents. Hey, millennials, have I got a great book for you to read–mine! You might also enjoy (Note: Some offers may have expired)Get Better Facebook Notifications for Suddenly FrugalFree and Cheap Flu Shots for Fall 2013365 Frugality Tips: Welcome to the Year of Renewed FrugalityFacts About Coupons for National Coupon MonthThe post Why Millennials Have Become Suddenly Frugal appeared first on Suddenly Frugal Blog.
about 1 hour ago
As power of coal industry declines, coal baron asks Supreme Court for help buying politicians #green
As power of coal industry declines, coal baron asks Supreme Court for help buying politicians #green
about 1 hour ago
Report: BMW mulled ten, eight, and six-cylinder engines for i8 before going hybrid #green
Report: BMW mulled ten, eight, and six-cylinder engines for i8 before going hybrid #green
about 2 hours ago
For the last several months, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) has teamed up with the creative geniuses at Free Range Studios to make this poignant two-minute film about the impacts of “Conflict Palm Oil” on orangutans—as seen through the ...
For the last several months, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) has teamed up with the creative geniuses at Free Range Studios to make this poignant two-minute film about the impacts of “Conflict Palm Oil” on orangutans—as seen through the eyes of a little girl communicating to an orphaned orangutan through sign language. RAN is doubling down on its campaign to protect the last wild orangutans and their rainforest homes from Conflict Palm Oil and we need lots of help to do it. Just last month, we launched our newest national campaign, The Last Stand of the Orangutan, targeting 20 of the top snack food companies using Conflict Palm Oilin their products. We’ve dubbed them The Snack Food 20, and they are companies like Pepsi, Heinz, Hershey’s, Kraft and Smucker’s—companies that control some of America’s most well-known household brands. Now we need your help: Can you share this video far and wide so it can be as effective a tool as possible for jumpstarting a national conversation about the extreme consequences hidden behind some of the common food products many of us take for granted every day? Palm oil is found in roughly half the products sold in grocery stores, and its production on vast industrial plantations is now one of the leading causes of rainforest destruction worldwide. Palm oil is the single biggest threat driving orangutans toward extinction, and is also responsible for widespread human rights violations including displacement of Indigenous Peoples, land conflicts with forest-dependent communities, and forced and child labor. On top of that, deforestation in Indonesia and Malaysia, where nearly all palm oil is grown, is responsible for more carbon pollution into earth’s atmosphere each year than all the cars, trucks, planes, trains and ships in the United States combined. In fact, due to deforestation, Indonesia has the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emissions behind only China and the United States. But we can do something about it! From moving Disney to stop sourcing paper from endangered rainforests to getting Burger King to stop using cattle grazed in the Amazon, RAN has learned well that an effective way to pressure and inspire companies to change is by nationalizing controversy over an issue and making sure the company knows that association with that issue is risky for its reputation and bottom line. This video is designed to speak to the customers that the Snack Food 20 care so much about—us—and to help catapult Conflict Palm Oil into the national consciousness in a way that The Snack Food 20 can’t ignore. The Snack Food 20 spend millions every year to instill brand loyalty and trust in their customers. They really do care what we think. It is crucial that these companies hear from you right now: Tell the Snack Food 20 that you will not stand for Conflict Palm Oil in your food. Together we can convince these brands to take action and change the destructive way Conflict Palm Oil is currently grown. Rainforest Action Network’s goal is to collect 60,600 #InYourPalm photo petitions—that’s one person standing for each orangutan remaining in the wild—to be delivered to each of the Snack Food 20 companies. RAN is demanding that each of these companies implement policies to ensure they only buy truly responsible palm oil that can be traced back to its source and is not driving deforestation, expansion onto carbon-rich peatlands or human and labor rights violations. Orangutans are among our closest relatives in the animal kingdom. They are amazingly like us in how they learn, play, and care for their young. But unlike us, if their homes are destroyed they cannot move on. We believe the power to save these incredible orangutans is in your palm. Please share this short film with your friends and family today and ask them to do the same! Originally published by RAN. Enjoy stories like this one? Got $25?  Help keep Civil Eats alive by supporting our Kickstarter Campaign before October 18.
about 2 hours ago
Ordinary men finally get the limelight in underwear ads via @thewonderist
Ordinary men finally get the limelight in underwear ads via @thewonderist
about 2 hours ago
(Credit: Extreme Tech) AUSTIN, TX — The recent hype around 3D printing has revolved mostly around the capacity for these printers to make guns, but could this new, futuristic technology also be used for such good as addressing glo...
(Credit: Extreme Tech) AUSTIN, TX — The recent hype around 3D printing has revolved mostly around the capacity for these printers to make guns, but could this new, futuristic technology also be used for such good as addressing global food scarcity and security? A SXSW Eco Conference panel in Austin, Texas addressed the question of whether this path-breaking technology holds the potential to produce nutrient-rich food that can be produced locally and on-demand, amongst other benefits. This could present certain solutions to increasing global food demand that don’t put so much strain on natural resources and also significantly reduce food waste. Both elements could lead to reduction in greenhouse gas emissions as well. “We have to produce as much food in the next 40 years as we have in the last 8,000,” Jason Clay, Senior Vice President for Market Transformation at the World Wildlife Fund, said. “By 2050 we’re going to have to produce twice as much food as we do today. We need to find a way to do this more sustainably. The biggest threat to the planet is to continue producing food in a business-as-usual fashion.” Clay was one of three panelists, including Hod Lipson, Associate Professor of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering and Computing & Information Science at Cornell University, and Jed Davis, Director of Sustainability at Cabot Creamery. None of the three panelists saw 3D food printing as a silver bullet to the problem of global food supply, but more as an interesting development that could be helpful in certain cases. “3D printing is not alchemy — food products go in and food products come out,” Clay said. “I don’t think 3D printing is the answer to food scarcity, it won’t achieve scale fast enough. And it’s also too expensive to help most of the 800 million people or so who are food insecure.” Lipson explained the history of 3D printing in brief as well as the emergence of 3D food printing. He said that the technology for 3D printing has been around for a long time and has been used to make things like electric parts, circuits, and batteries. His goal has always been to print a 3D robot that will walk out of the printer, batteries included. In the last decade or so the technology for 3D printers was made open source, meaning that blueprints and software were made available for all to use in building their own 3D printers at a much lower cost than manufacturers charge. “One thing everybody made with these printers wasn’t robots or machine parts, it was food,” Lipson said. “If you think about it, it makes sense because most peoples’ experiments in making things at home involve food.” Lipton sees this as a new and interesting blend of information technology and cooking that has already led to a lot of ideas. “3D printers give us a new angle to see if we can be more efficient with food, make healthier diets, make more types of food with fewer ingredients, or make food on-demand as needed so we don’t end up wasting so much,” Lipton said. “Or some stranger things, like making airplane-shaped broccoli so kids are more likely to eat it.” Davis added to the implications of the convergence of food and information technology. “As technology develops some interesting prospects for the human race many of the ones that have been most readily embraced have been in medicine,” he said. “Meanwhile, many that create the most uproar or controversy are in the food industry. What we do to keep our bodies healthy in terms of technology seems to supersede what we’re willing to do to the food that we put in our bodies.” Davis gave the example that maybe one day delicious cheese could be printed with an extra supply of vitamins or minerals. “Is this acceptable? And what’s it going to taste like?,” he said. Clay offered a few more pos
about 2 hours ago
The Ghosts of Boom Mining in Butte, Montana #green
The Ghosts of Boom Mining in Butte, Montana #green
about 2 hours ago
A closer look at an animation attempting to explain the difference between climate trends and variations.
A closer look at an animation attempting to explain the difference between climate trends and variations.
about 2 hours ago