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Comedy Team: Gerry Moore shows Jimmy Durante how to plant food in a Victory Garden By the US Government War Activities Committee 1945 Jimmy Durante and Garry Moore give tips on raising a successful victory garden during World War 2. Thei...
Comedy Team: Gerry Moore shows Jimmy Durante how to plant food in a Victory Garden By the US Government War Activities Committee 1945 Jimmy Durante and Garry Moore give tips on raising a successful victory garden during World War 2. Their popular radio program, ‘The Camel Comedy Caravan and The Rexal’, launched Garry Moore’s career, revived Jimmy Durante’s, and served as the model for Hanna-Barbera’s popular Augie Doggie & Doggie Daddy cartoons. Sample of Jimmy Durante and Garry Moore in ‘The Camel Comedy Caravan and The Rexal’ here.
about 2 hours ago
“Although these are positive results, it is too early to conclude that all urban agriculture projects in the Netherlands can be run profitably.” By Applied Plant Research Wageningen UR Report Published Sept. 2013 In Dutch with some Engli...
“Although these are positive results, it is too early to conclude that all urban agriculture projects in the Netherlands can be run profitably.” By Applied Plant Research Wageningen UR Report Published Sept. 2013 In Dutch with some English, 101 page Urban agriculture always generates a great deal of enthusiasm. However, many people wonder what the ultimate benefits are. To clarify this issue, researchers from Wageningen UR have produced, together with Witteveen+Bos consultancy, a social cost-benefit analysis (SCBA) for three urban agriculture projects. The researchers analysed three cases: an existing project, “Food Garden Rotterdam” and the plans for “Regional development De Nieuwe Warande Tilburg” and “Hazennest Farm” in Tilburg. The analysis revealed a large number of social benefits such as: health benefits for the volunteers due to a healthier lifestyle, improved liveability (because of the recreational possibilities), more pleasurable living and more job opportunities. After expressing the social benefits in financial terms and subtracting the actual costs of financing the projects, the researchers proved that all three projects are socially beneficial and contribute to sustainable social development in urban areas and in the whole country. The analysis also demonstrated that care farms and large-scale farm shops can be profitable. Excerpt from the Report: Summary The socio-economic benefits of urban agriculture Introduction Urban agriculture is currently the focus of societal interest as a highly promising contribution to sustainable urban development. For many agricultural professionals, city-oriented services such as healthcare, education, hospitality and retail trade are interesting alternatives to expanding the scale of their farms. For individual urban residents, urban agriculture offers an easily accessible location in and around the city to relax, learn, work, meet others and engage in various forms of recreation. And for the neighbourhood, urban agriculture often means improvement of the physical and social environment. Conclusions The three urban agricultural initiatives in the study all appear to be socio-economic beneficial. They contribute to sustainable social development in the city and adjacent countryside. Urban agriculture is beneficial for existing farmers (better financial result), for holidaymakers and the neighbourhood residents (pleasurable living, recreational amenities and avoided crimes), for employees on the farms (avoided costs of unemployment), for the volunteers at the Food Garden (avoided costs of unemployment, enhanced health) and for the clients of the care farms. Stated another way, urban agriculture provides more production options for farmers, creates jobs for unskilled workers, reactivates unskilled workers and creates better physical and social quality in the neighbourhood. Urban agriculture in the form of large-scale care in the city and farm shops in the adjacent rural area appear to be not only socio-economic beneficial, but also financially profitable. Urban agriculture in the form of recreation or a small-scale farm shop in the adjacent rural area, or a food garden in the city, appear to be unprofitable for farmers. Without an alternative earning model, it is unlikely that farmers can invest in such initiatives. In that case, the benefits would be substantially lower; as a result, the municipality will probably not receive sufficient return on its investment in the area. The municipality and farmers can work together to develop an alternative earning model. Recommendations By means of an SCBA, this study has provided an insight into the socio-economic benefits of urban agriculture. Despite the positive results, it is still too early to conclude that all forms of urban agriculture at all locations in the Netherlands have a positive cost-benefit balance. To test such a hypothesis, the following information is required: - an analysis of additional types of urban agriculture, such
about 2 hours ago
Here’s another reason to love fall: green tomatoes. Back in D.C., we’d get a huge hall of green tomatoes all the way into November. Not so much this year, as we only had a couple of tomato plants in our new garden here in Ups...
Here’s another reason to love fall: green tomatoes. Back in D.C., we’d get a huge hall of green tomatoes all the way into November. Not so much this year, as we only had a couple of tomato plants in our new garden here in Upstate New York. We’ve got voles or field mice noshing on the ripe ones, so we were glad to gather up a bunch of green tomatoes they hadn’t touched. Over the years we’ve learned there are plenty of great foods you can make with green tomatoes, not least of which is one of our all-time favorite condiments, green tomato and apple chutney. My wife loves green tomato, bacon and lettuce sandwiches. She also makes a mean green tomato pizza. In fact, three years ago I gathered together all of our favorite green tomato treatments in a post you can read here. A classic treatment, of course, is frying green tomatoes. Everybody’s heard of that, and they truly are delicious. Here you see some we made last night as a side for pork chops. Daughter made her special remoulade sauce as an accompaniment. Making these is more method than recipe. The first advice my wife has to give is make sure to slice the tomatoes thickly–not thin–about 1/3 inch. Then lay the slices on slices on a baking sheet and season with salt, pepper and a bit of sugar. Allow to rest a few minutes. Meanwhile, pour your favorite vegetable oil into a large, heavy skillet to a depth of 1 inch. Turn on the heat: You’ll want to get the oil to 360 degrees Fahrenheit, as measured with an instant-read thermometer. While the oil is coming up to temperature, mix 1 1/3 cups flour and 2/3 cup cornmeal in a large mixing bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg and buttermilk. Dredge the tomato slices first in the flour mix, then the egg mix, then the flour mix again. In batches, lower the tomato slices into the hot allow and cook until golden, turning the slices as necessary. We like to use spring-loaded tongs for this. Remove the fried tomato slices to a baking sheet covered with paper towels to drain. Serve warm and thank the gods of fall for green tomatoes.
about 2 hours ago
Exploring the Small Farm Dream in New Jersey and Beyond Thinking of starting a small farm? The Exploring the Small Farm Dream class might be one way to figure out where to start, and whether you really should start. According to a New Je...
Exploring the Small Farm Dream in New Jersey and Beyond Thinking of starting a small farm? The Exploring the Small Farm Dream class might be one way to figure out where to start, and whether you really should start. According to a New Jersey-based news source, the class is being offered on four Monday evenings [...]
about 4 hours ago
1 day ago
Click image to see larger file. “Every year there are at least 1.4 million shipping containers sent back to Asia to be recycled.” Designed by Keith Dewey for City Farmer Society Owner, Designer of Zigloo.ca Victoria, BC. June, 2013 Excer...
Click image to see larger file. “Every year there are at least 1.4 million shipping containers sent back to Asia to be recycled.” Designed by Keith Dewey for City Farmer Society Owner, Designer of Zigloo.ca Victoria, BC. June, 2013 Excerpt from Zigloo: Zigloo.ca is a design house that is leading the way in custom design with a difference. The difference is finding sustainable solutions to building technologies, especially in the use of shipping containers as architectural building blocks. The benefits of which are lowering our carbon footprint, saving our forests and doing it affordably. Zigloo domestique is a prototype concept that has led to a number of CargoSpace Living projects throughout North America. Keith Dewey (owner of Zigloo.ca) created zigloo domestique as a show home to entice people to think differently about the way we live and to demonstrate that living sustainably doesn’t mean “living without”. Click image to see larger file. Keith moved to Victoria BC after graduating from the Ontario College of Art and Design (Toronto) in 1994 and has designed hundreds of custom homes all over British Columbia … including some of Victoria‘s most celebrated award winning projects. Moving to Canada‘s west coast, from Toronto, inspired Keith to see everyday living in a whole new light … and this is what Zigloo.ca is all about. A truly new way to live. Keith, his wife and daughter, live in the zigloo domestique house by the ocean, surrounded by mountains, on the southern tip of Vancouver Island. - See Zigloo here. See Keith and Heather Dewey’s 2,000 square foot home in Victoria is made of shipping containers here.
1 day ago
DeNae Friedheim of Lansing on a 1 acre parcel of land that she rents on a farm in Bath, Michigan. Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press. Experts say women are gravitating to small-scale farming that is very consumer-based, and doesn̵...
DeNae Friedheim of Lansing on a 1 acre parcel of land that she rents on a farm in Bath, Michigan. Photo: Eric Seals, Detroit Free Press. Experts say women are gravitating to small-scale farming that is very consumer-based, and doesn’t require barns or silos because the food is going right from farm to farmers market. By Patricia Montemurri Detroit Free Press September 29, 2013 Excerpt: Marilyn Barber, 57, of Detroit was laid off from a university employment service job and now farms and teaches small-scale farming to others at Earthworks farm on the site of the Capuchin Soup Kitchen on the city’s east side. This, from a woman whose own mother called to remind her to water the backyard garden that mom traveled from Columbus, Ohio, to plant. “The passion hadn’t hit me,” joked Barber, while recently tending Earthworks’ Thursday farm stand. “Now, I call my mom and say, ‘Guess what we grew today.’” Akilah Muhammad, 31, of Detroit learned farming techniques at Earthworks and is using them to start a vegetarian catering business. “How many children can say, ‘My mommy grew this and picked this and now I’m eating it,’” said Muhammad, “and I think there’s a growing desire for this kind of food.” Small-scale farms and community gardens also have become urban tourist attractions. Read the complete article here.
1 day ago
NSAC On Making Land More Affordable for Farmers Yesterday, I wrote a blog post about a New York Times op-ed, which claimed farmland conservation efforts are not helping farmers who lack significant capital resources access good quality f...
NSAC On Making Land More Affordable for Farmers Yesterday, I wrote a blog post about a New York Times op-ed, which claimed farmland conservation efforts are not helping farmers who lack significant capital resources access good quality farmland with long-term tenure arrangements. The National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition (NSAC) also had something to say about this [...]
1 day ago
After five months of steady work on the new farm, my wife thought it was time I got some R & R. She cashed in some frequent flyer miles and packed me off to D.C. for a few days to visit the old haunts. Hanging with friends was like enter...
After five months of steady work on the new farm, my wife thought it was time I got some R & R. She cashed in some frequent flyer miles and packed me off to D.C. for a few days to visit the old haunts. Hanging with friends was like entering a time warp–like no time had passed at all. There was lots of partying and a little too much fun, I’m afraid. Here I am visiting the Dupont Circle farmers market on Sunday. Compared to the slim pickings we find at the market here in Cambridge, NY, the bounty in D.C. is truly astounding. We took our time strolling around and marveling at the plethora of fresh goods. It seemed like everything in the seed catalogue was represented. I had a great time dining out with friends. Our old neighborhood is booming, with new restaurants opening at a dizzying pace. You say the U.S. economy is in the dumps? You’d never know it for all the activity in the nation’s capital. Five days away also gave me a chance to take stock of where we’ve been the last few months and where we’re headed on the farm. A little breather was in order, since I ache all over. I guess I wasn’t expecting this venture to take such a physical toll. My 18-year-old brain is trapped in a 60-year-old body, and the body is showing its age. Conclusion: I won’t be able to keep this up forever. I need to reassess how I deal with certain tasks on the farm, such as how to keep the grass down. I can’t go on scything day after day. Nor can I go on tending the livestock by lugging 5-gallon buckets of water all over the property. I’ve also got to shed some of this body weight I’ve been lugging around. It’s just too tiring. We’ve saved our pennies not buying heavy equipment and instead poured our money into basic infrastructure such as fencing and water lines. Now it’s time to start thinking how we handle basic chores into the future, like mowing grass and filling water troughs. This trial period has given us a much clearer vision of what we need out of a tractor. We’ll be looking into that much more intensely in the coming months. But with winter not too far over the horizon, we also have to prepare for new issues: where to keep the animals, how to feed them when the grass goes dormant, how to keep them watered when the water is quick to freeze. The harsh new weather pattern sure to come is my next big concern. I need to make sure I’ve still got the arms and legs to handle it.
2 days ago
Are Land Trusts and Farmland Conservation Efforts Helping Beginning Farmers? An interesting op-ed in the New York Times graced my computer screen the other day, and begged me to ask the question: is farmland conservation helping or hurti...
Are Land Trusts and Farmland Conservation Efforts Helping Beginning Farmers? An interesting op-ed in the New York Times graced my computer screen the other day, and begged me to ask the question: is farmland conservation helping or hurting beginning farmers? Lindsey Lusher Shute and Benjamin Shute are co-founders of the National Young Farmers Coalition. Together [...]
2 days ago