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A closer look at an animation attempting to explain the difference between climate trends and variations.
A closer look at an animation attempting to explain the difference between climate trends and variations.
44 minutes ago
This little solar powered device can take the guesswork out of SODIS water treatment and help the resulting water is safe to drink.
This little solar powered device can take the guesswork out of SODIS water treatment and help the resulting water is safe to drink.
about 1 hour ago
Tesla CTO JB Straubel doesn’t waffle when it comes to his opinions on autonomous vehicle technology. At Stanford’s Global Climate and Energy Project Symposium this week, Straubel said that not only is autonomous vehicle techn...
Tesla CTO JB Straubel doesn’t waffle when it comes to his opinions on autonomous vehicle technology. At Stanford’s Global Climate and Energy Project Symposium this week, Straubel said that not only is autonomous vehicle technology, or “autopilot” as he described it “inevitable,” but it will be “transformational,” and all the technology that is needed — like sensors and processors — are already all here. “It’s going to happen,” said Straubel in an onstage interview with Tesla investor Ira Ehrenpreis, adding “this will happen sooner than people think.” The technology will start with independent active safety systems in cars, and over time cars will have systems that take over the mundane and boring features of the car, explained Straubel. Tesla CTO JB Straubel speaks at the launch of the Model S Tesla has been investing a quite of bit of time into the technology and has been hiring “a large team,” said Straubel. Tesla has long maintained that it is trying to push the envelope of car technology, beyond just electrifying vehicles. The company has built bleeding edge tech features into its second-gen car the Model S like voice recognition, large in vehicle dashboards, and remote over-the-air software updates. While this type of autonomous vehicle technology might seem futuristic, it’s actually widely used in all other vehicles, said Straubel. The auto industry has just been particularly slow moving to adopt it. Vehicles like planes, ships, and space ships all use auto pilot for safety reasons, and Straubel said “They didn’t do it because the pilot was bored; they did it because of safety.” Safety is also the reason that personal cars need this technology. “People drivers are probably the least trained of all the different vehicle operators. If there is one place that it would be most relevant it would be in a car,” said Straubel. Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial.The fourth quarter of 2012 in cleantechCleantech and investment in 2013Cleantech third-quarter 2012
about 1 hour ago
Energy software startup Opower says it’s now collectively saved 3 terawatt hours of energy — or enough to power the homes in Las Vegas for a year — across its 22 million utility customers and 90 utility clients. I’...
Energy software startup Opower says it’s now collectively saved 3 terawatt hours of energy — or enough to power the homes in Las Vegas for a year — across its 22 million utility customers and 90 utility clients. I’m looking forward to seeing what’s next for Opower . . .IPO? More work with its thermostat software? Related research and analysis from GigaOM Pro:Subscriber content. Sign up for a free trial.How energy data will impact the smart gridCleantech and investment in 2013Ups and downs for cleantech in Q1
about 3 hours ago
Climate change could significantly transform up to 86 percent of the planet’s land ecosystems under worst-case global warming scenarios, according to researchers at Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. Tha...
Climate change could significantly transform up to 86 percent of the planet’s land ecosystems under worst-case global warming scenarios, according to researchers at Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. That estimate is based on a 4 to 5 degree C temperature increase by the year 2100 — a scenario that is plausible given many nations’ reluctance to enact greenhouse gas emissions limits, the researchers say. Even if global temperatures are kept to 2 degrees C above preindustrial levels, 20 percent of natural land ecosystems are at risk of moderate or major changes, especially high-altitude and high-latitude regions. Such changes could include boreal forests being transformed into temperate savannas, trees growing in thawed Arctic tundra, or even a dieback of some of the world’s tropical forests. “Essentially, we would be leaving the world as we know it,” says Sebastian Ostberg, who led the research. “The findings clearly demonstrate that there is a large difference in the risk of global ecosystem change under a scenario of no climate change mitigation compared to one of ambitious mitigation,” he added. A second study by Potsdam Institute researchers predicts that climate-related land changes could put 500 million people worldwide at risk for water scarcity. Article appearing courtesy Yale Environment 360. Related posts:Rockies Wilderness Area Sought as Buffer to Climate ChangeGrowth of Urban Areas Poses Long-Term Threats, Study SaysForests Ability To Absorb Carbon May Be Better Than First ThoughtUrban Climate Adaptation Hampered by Fiscal Restraints, Survey FindsEmerging Economies Among the Most Vulnerable to Climate Change, Report SaysCopyright © 2008-2010 CleanTechies, Inc. and Partners This feed is for personal, non-commercial use only. Written by Yale Environment 360. To the comments (Digital Fingerprint: b008bf120fbd682ffd7ee5812c495c9a)Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)
about 4 hours ago
Designer David Graas hops onto the Next Big Thing bandwagon.
Designer David Graas hops onto the Next Big Thing bandwagon.
about 4 hours ago
Wendell Berry is a fount of wisdom and inspiration, so it was great to see that Bill Moyers spoke with the farmer, poet, eco-philosopher about the role of activism and spirit in creating positive change.
Wendell Berry is a fount of wisdom and inspiration, so it was great to see that Bill Moyers spoke with the farmer, poet, eco-philosopher about the role of activism and spirit in creating positive change.
about 5 hours ago
Nope. It is just another example of the anti-environmental, anti-sustainability, climate-change denying, anti-Agenda 21 crowd hard at work.
Nope. It is just another example of the anti-environmental, anti-sustainability, climate-change denying, anti-Agenda 21 crowd hard at work.
about 5 hours ago
In the near future, it will be possible to communicate with nearly every device in your home. More importantly the value people will get from communicating with these previously dumb, lifeless things will far outweigh the costs of learni...
In the near future, it will be possible to communicate with nearly every device in your home. More importantly the value people will get from communicating with these previously dumb, lifeless things will far outweigh the costs of learning their language. They will be able to capture data, communicate vital information to us that we wouldn’t otherwise know and even act when different events take place. And when enough of these devices are connected to the Internet, we will be able to choreograph them to work together based on our specific needs. While many people have labeled this forthcoming revolution the “internet of things,” a more accurate description is the “programmable world.” This wave of technology will wash over us and have an impact on every object that is tied to security, safety, energy use and convenience. Your home will start thinking and be able to detect the presence of people, pets, cars, smoke, humidity, moisture, lighting, temperature, vibration, angle, and movement. Objects will get to know you and start learning your habits. The programmable world is in its very early stages but it’s gathering strength. Its inevitability is being driven by three complementary trends: first and foremost, the smartphone revolution; second, improved standards for low-power, inexpensive and highly reliable wireless communications; and finally, ever-decreasing barriers to invention due to increased automation of manufacturing technologies. These three forces are converging to create a tipping point that will lead to mass penetration of connected devices in homes during the next ten years. Building homes aware of their owners Many of the secondary implications of massive technology waves are unpredictable, but we are able to see the core impact of the programmable world will have on our homes and lives. First, we will have total knowledge and control of our homes in the palms of our hands – anywhere in the world. Just as we now check our email on our phones, we will soon be able to use our smartphones or tablets to control all of the lights, appliances, locks, and thermostats in our homes. We will know who is home, what’s happening in certain rooms and whether there are potential dangers like unexpected movement when we’re not there. This last point is a big one. Consider that, according to a recent Forbes article , only 16 percent of households have a security system despite 85 percent of consumers wanting one. Making it easier for anyone to monitor and control their homes from a distance will have massive implications. Future home monitoring technologies will not only be more reasonably priced and more compatible with other platforms than today’s security systems; they will also be able to prevent potential risks from becoming disasters – both in and outside our homes. Smart systems will be able to automatically call the police when intruders are detected. They could also send you immediate alerts when leaks are detected, when valuable items move, or when the kids try to access off-limits cabinets or areas of the house. The programmable world won’t just make our homes smarter; it will make them more secure. Second, the everyday objects and things we know so well will get to know us, too. Lights will know just how bright you like our bedroom when you’re waking up. The coffee maker will know when you’re in the shower so it can start brewing your morning cup just the way you like it. And the dog’s collar won’t just know what time you leave for work each day, but also it could remind you to feed Barkley if you reach for the door before filling his bowl. Programmable houses create greener worlds The intuitive, intelligent home has led many to equate the programmable world as offering a sort of Jetsons-style convenience, but it also offers a far more meaningful possibility: widespread energy conservation. It’s long been established we can reduce up to 30 percent of energy emissions simply by turning household electronics, applianc
about 6 hours ago
Two years ago GE made some big bets on the internet of things — what it calls the industrial internet. It opened an office in San Ramone, Calif. and started articulating a vision of connected sensors sending data to either a box on-premi...
Two years ago GE made some big bets on the internet of things — what it calls the industrial internet. It opened an office in San Ramone, Calif. and started articulating a vision of connected sensors sending data to either a box on-premise or a cloud. Analyzing that data through GE’s algorithms would help GE and its customers determine maintenance schedules, when to operate at times that use the least energy, and a variety of other scenarios designed to improve efficiency and save money. On Wednesday GE said that it has brought in $290 million so far this year from products built using this industrial internet philosophy and booked an anticipated $400 million in revenue. That may not seem like much for a company that had sales of $147.36 billion last year, but this is a two-year-old effort inside GE. GE also expanded the line of product offerings it has in its Predictivity line from 10 to 24, announced Intel, Cisco and AT&T as its latest partners and detailed its platform for building out the industrial internet, called Predix. Think of it as Amazon Web Services for the industrial internet. The announcement basics Predix is a platform for industrial applications. Applications can be built for any system or machine — from jet engines to MRI scanners — and be remotely managed while connected to the internet. So far there are four components to the platform, for the sensors themselves, analytics, management of the connected devices, and a vague one called Predix Experience. Next year GE plans to offer a developer program that lets third parties integrate Predix platform technologies into their own services. Of the new partners, AT&T will handle connectivity via cellular, wireline and perhaps even Wi-Fi management techniques courtesy of AT&T’s Wayport division. Cisco and GE will continue an existing business relationship to “include collaboration in industries that may include oil and gas, transportation, healthcare, and power generation.” GE says it will work with Intel to “embed virtualization and cloud-based, standardized interfaces within the GE Predix platform.” What it all means for GE and the internet of things With this announcement it becomes clear that GE is following the web-oriented model of building out a platform, taking care of the hard problems associated with industrial data, analytics and hosting data in the cloud on behalf of its clients. To be clear, GE has its own servers, its own database technologies and other aspects of this platform, but this “big tent” approach will help it deliver a wider array of functionality as well as a scale that it might need as more customers get on board. AWS as a partner provides the baseline compute, while Pivotal will provide both the data analytics and PaaS-like structure — kind of like a Heroku for building on Predix. Developers will use Pivotal’s tools to build applications that can help take advantage of GE’s Predix platform. So while there are 24 products right now for GE customers, there might one day be hundreds more made by GE customers, or perhaps outside developers, built using Pivotal’s tools. As for connectivity and AT&T, I asked Bill Ruh (pictured above), vice president of GE’s software and analytics center, about AT&T’s pricing models, because it’s still unclear if clients will want to buy connectivity separately or as part of some overall Predictivity product. It’s also unclear if AT&T has pricing plans in place that treat cellular, wireline and other services as one monolithic option. When you have 100 sensors on every car in a fleet, you don’t want to think individually about the optimal way to connect each. Ruh isn’t sure yet what clients want (they probably aren’t either) but, whatever it is, he’s prepared to give it to them. I’m hoping he’ll talk more about the challenges of ubiquitous connectivity when he speaks at our Mobilize event next week. The bigger surprise was the inclusion of Intel, which Ruh described as the way GE planned to embed sm
about 6 hours ago