Healthy Recipes

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Based on actress Haylie Duff’s successful blog of the same name, The Real Girl’s Kitchen cookbook features her favorite recipes for healthy living. Try out recipes for quick lunches,... ** This is only a summary of our conte...
Based on actress Haylie Duff’s successful blog of the same name, The Real Girl’s Kitchen cookbook features her favorite recipes for healthy living. Try out recipes for quick lunches,... ** This is only a summary of our content.**
about 5 hours ago
Scallions, thyme and Scotch bonnet chiles give this recipe kick.
Scallions, thyme and Scotch bonnet chiles give this recipe kick.
about 5 hours ago
Megan Myers When fall arrives, I automatically start thinking about what meals I’m going to be creating in the slow cooker. It’s not just because of the cooler temperatures – the hustle and bustle of back-to-school routines and approachi...
Megan Myers When fall arrives, I automatically start thinking about what meals I’m going to be creating in the slow cooker. It’s not just because of the cooler temperatures – the hustle and bustle of back-to-school routines and approaching holidays makes getting dinner on the table fast a priority. Quick breads, biscuits and other no-yeast breads are a great way to round out a slow-cooker meal. They’re perfect for mopping up that last bit of broth in your bowl, and if you choose the right flavors, can be a wonderful complement to whatever has been bubbling away all day. Bacon Bread Use up extra bacon in this savory quick bread. Leftovers, if you manage to have any, are great toasted for breakfast the next day. Borough Market Cheddar Popovers Popovers seem fancy, but actually come together quickly. This cheese and chive version is perfect with a hearty beef stew. Whole Wheat Cornbread Muffins Cornbread holds its own against soups and stews, and this muffin version makes it handy, too. Those avoiding dairy should try our dairy-free cornbread recipe. Coconut Oil Biscuits These tender biscuits made with coconut oil are a nice change-up, but if you prefer a more classic biscuit, try our Fresh Herb Buttermilk Biscuits. Bacon, Walnut and Thyme Scones Scones mix up and bake in a flash, and can be customized in almost endless ways. Bacon is a hit again in this recipe, or try Cheddar and Chive Scones. What’s your favorite quick bread to pair with slow cooker meals? Please share in the comments!
about 9 hours ago
Does Snack Girl look like she has time to make meatballs? Look at me up there! I look busy.... continue reading
Does Snack Girl look like she has time to make meatballs? Look at me up there! I look busy.... continue reading
about 12 hours ago
I had to restrain myself from licking the screen when I uploaded this photo of Paleo Caramel Brownies –pictured with coconut milk. Paleo Caramel Brownies are a fun and festive treat. Serve these gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free ...
I had to restrain myself from licking the screen when I uploaded this photo of Paleo Caramel Brownies –pictured with coconut milk. Paleo Caramel Brownies are a fun and festive treat. Serve these gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free brownies at a holiday party or if you are a crossfitter, after your WOD, as a little recovery treat. […] The post Paleo Caramel Brownies appeared first on... Click on the title to be taken to the full post at www.elanaspantry.com. Please note: This email was sent from a notification-only address that cannot accept incoming email. Please do not reply to this message.
about 21 hours ago
The Editors at Food52.com Oats can (and should!) be celebrated in so many recipes beyond oatmeal – from savory, creamy risottos to chewy granola bars and everything in between.  Forget about that processed oatmeal of breakfasts past and ...
The Editors at Food52.com Oats can (and should!) be celebrated in so many recipes beyond oatmeal – from savory, creamy risottos to chewy granola bars and everything in between.  Forget about that processed oatmeal of breakfasts past and embrace these five recipes that give hard-working oats the attention and treatment they rightly deserve. Photo by James Ransom Recipe: Oat Risotto with Peas Not just a comforting and savory brunch dish, this risotto-like preparation of oats would be great for dinner paired with some greens, or as a side to chicken or juicy portabella mushrooms. Don’t skip the step of toasting the oats or you’ll miss out on the deep, nutty flavor it brings. Photo by James Ransom Recipe: Heavenly Oatmeal Molasses Rolls These supple, rich rolls have just a hint of sweetness to them – they're chewy, tender and full of deep flavor from the molasses, but versatile enough to complement (rather than overwhelm) a variety of main dishes. We love the ease of the first refrigerator rise, and these are virtually guaranteed to come out looking beautiful, with their butter-slicked and oat-flecked tops. Photo by James Ransom Recipe: Oatmeal and Lavender Shortbread These shortbreads are sublime thanks to an almost coconut-ty texture and lovely nuttiness from the oats, plus lavender as a delightful and graceful finishing note. Enjoy them right out of the oven if you want, but they’re even better the next day: a little sturdier for packing and with a deeper flavor.  Photo by James Ransom Recipe: Cavatelli with Asiago Oat Crumbs This is a cookie dough experiment gone wrong, and we couldn't be happier for the kitchen disaster. You'll swear the crumb mixture tastes familiar, and you'll agree – a dough once destined for cookies is a revelation on pasta. Photo by James Ransom Recipe: 5 Minute, No Bake Granola Bars A granola bar you don't have to bake, with a recipe that won't tie you down. As the title suggests, these granola bars will take you five minutes from start to finish, tops. Here, oats headline in sweet, salty snack bars, and are balanced with a mix of nuts, dried fruit and nut butter. Add or subtract whatever you want (chocolate chips! sunflower seeds!) for a completely customizable snacking experience. What are your favorite ways to eat oats, beyond oatmeal? Share your comments below!
about 23 hours ago
In North America, the pomegranate season runs from late summer until early winter, making now the perfect time to start incorporating jewel-like pomegranates into meals and snacks. This dish has just... ** This is only a summary of our ...
In North America, the pomegranate season runs from late summer until early winter, making now the perfect time to start incorporating jewel-like pomegranates into meals and snacks. This dish has just... ** This is only a summary of our content.**
about 24 hours ago
Welcome to another edition of the Real Food Kitchen Tour. This week, we travel to Boston, Massachusetts to tour the kitchen of Lori Elliott, author of the blog, Our Heritage of Health What’s a Real Foodie? A “real foodie̶...
Welcome to another edition of the Real Food Kitchen Tour. This week, we travel to Boston, Massachusetts to tour the kitchen of Lori Elliott, author of the blog, Our Heritage of Health What’s a Real Foodie? A “real foodie” is someone who cooks “traditional” food. We cook stuff from scratch using real ingredients, like raw milk, grass-fed beef, eggs from chickens that run around outdoors, whole grains, sourdough and yogurt starters, mineral-rich sea salt, and natural sweeteners like honey and real maple syrup. We don’t use modern foods that are either fake, super-refined, or denatured. This includes modern vegetable oils like Crisco and margarine, soy milk, meat from factory farms, pasteurized milk from cows eating corn and soybeans, refined white flour, factory-made sweeteners like HFCS or even refined white sugar, or commercial yeast. We believe in eating wholesome, nutrient-dense foods that come from nature. So we shop at farmer’s markets or buy direct from the farmer, or we grow food in our own backyards. This Week’s Real Food Kitchen Tour: Our Heritage of Health Blog Name: Our Heritage of Health Blog Author: Lori Elliott Location: Boston, MA How Long Blogging: 1 1/2 years House or Apartment: House Size of Kitchen: 12 1/2 ft. x 10 ft. Things You Love About Your Kitchen: I really like the unique shape of the cabinets and shelves. My grandfather built the house himself in the 1950s so the kitchen has a homemade, vintage feel to it. I also love the big, 19th century pantry cupboard I found at an antiques flea market. It’s great for storage, and it gives the kitchen some character. Things You Would Change: The kitchen is a bit on the small side, so having a little more space would be nice, especially when my dog Daisy plants herself in the middle of the floor to catch any food that falls! I also wish there was more natural lighting in there. The only window in the kitchen is on the shady side of the house, so it’s really hard to get good lighting to take photos for blog posts. Favorite Tools & Gadgets: I don’t use very many modern kitchen gadgets, and my favorite tools are all ones I found at antique stores. I use my old wooden mortar and pestle for grinding herbs and spices, and I use an antique kitchen scale for weighing meat when I want to separate bulk purchases into smaller portions. My antique wood-handled vegetable peeler works better than any modern peeler I’ve tried, and my favorite and most-used tool is my little antique cast iron pan. It’s the perfect size for heating up leftovers on the stove. Biggest Challenges Cooking Real Food: My biggest challenge is probably time management and planning ahead. If I want to make sourdough bread or soak flour in buttermilk for a cake, I have to remember the night before to prepare the dough or batter. It also takes longer to shop for food now that I don’t get everything at the regular grocery store. I get my pastured eggs from one farm, my veggies from another, and my meat from another, so it takes a bit more time to drive around to source those different real food ingredients. Current Family Favorite Meal: I love to eat seasonally, so now that autumn has arrived, my current favorite meal is pastured ham with carrots, onions, sweet potatoes, apples, and pears all simmered in a sauce of butter and apple cider and seasoned with salt, pepper, garlic, sage, thyme, cinnamon, and cloves. It’s absolutely delicious! Favorite Cookbooks: Except for Nourishing Traditions, of course, my favorite cookbooks are all 19th century books and recipe pamphlets that I’ve collected over the years, including Mrs. Winslow’s Domestic Receipt Book, The Young Housekeeper’s Friend, and The Domestic Cookery and Family Receipt Book. These cookbooks were written in a time before the invention of pesticides, artificial additives, and hydrogenated oils, etc. and just about every recipe in them is already a real food recipe Check Out the Previous Real Foo
1 day ago
Maddy Martin Just in time for the cooler fall weather and to gear up for the holiday cookfest fast approaching, here's an encore presentation of Food52's Kitchen Basics originally published last year. Russ Parson's Dry-Brined Turkey [...
Maddy Martin Just in time for the cooler fall weather and to gear up for the holiday cookfest fast approaching, here's an encore presentation of Food52's Kitchen Basics originally published last year. Russ Parson's Dry-Brined Turkey [Food52] (photo by James Ransom) Crisp on the outside and tender and juicy on the inside, large cuts of meat like prime rib, leg of lamb, and whole turkey are something worthy of oohs and ahhs. But getting that roast to the table can be an intimidating task, especially since we're not practicing these sorts of recipes on a regular weeknight (or even regular weekend, for that matter). There's no reason to fret -- whether you're looking to hone tried-and-true recipes or it's your first time hosting one of the many big meals, we're here to help. The Basics of Roasting Large Cuts of MeatBuying Tips The best large-format meats for roasting are those that are naturally tender. Stay away from tough cuts such as shoulders and chuck roasts, as they are better suited for braising or other low-and-slow methods. Fat is helpful when roasting. Well marbled meat is important for a roast. You can also ask your butcher to "lard" your meat by inserting strips of pork fat within the meat or "bard" the meat by wrapping it in a thin web of fat. Both methods help prevent the meat from drying out. Make sure your cut of meat is thick -- at least two or three inches. If you decide to go thin, roll your meat and truss it to keep it moist. Check out some tips on trussing or ask your butcher to do it for you. Plan on buying about 1 1/2 pounds of meat per person. Keep in mind that bones are extra weight, and won't fill anyone up! Make friends with your butcher! They're professionals, and can usually impart some important knowledge. Don't forget to order ahead if you're looking for special cuts, and especially around the holidays. Fresh or frozen, take your pick. Just remember if you are buying meat ahead of time and need to freeze it, the meat will need about 24 hours of thawing (in the fridge) per every four pounds. Plan ahead! When buying a whole turkey, a plump breast and pinkish-white skin usually means a healthy bird. Looking for more guidance? Check out this helpful how-to on buying a turkey from Whole Foods Market. Tools & Set Up Your roasting pan will be your new best friend. Buy one that is sturdy, with large handles for pulling the roast out of the oven. Ditch the aluminium foil pan which won't hold the weight and will only disappoint when your lovely roast (and all those hard-won drippings) makes a run for the floor.  Stay away from non-stick or dark interiors if you want to capitalize on the drippings. They won't give you that same carmelized taste that's so crucial to the best gravies. High sides are helpful for keeping the hot, dry air circulating around your roast and any vegetables fully contained.  Many pans come pre-equipped with roasting racks. If yours didn't, make sure to pick one up. This keeps your roast from getting soggy and boosts air circulation and even browning. In a crunch or feeling creative? Make a rack from hard veggies like carrots or parsnips. The main idea is to not let your meat touch the bottom of the pan. A thermometer is a must for every roast! In-oven corded varieties allow you to check the temp without opening the oven door (and letting precious heat out). But instant-read ones work just fine, as well -- just don't dawdle! Remove your roast when it hits five degrees below the desired internal temperature. It will keep cooking after you remove it from the heat. Every roast benefits from resting (for about 15 to 20 minutes) before its carved to ensure carryover cooking has finished its business. Some recipes suggest starting your roast off at a higher temperature, and then lowering the heat down the road. This helps give your roast that crisp exterior that we all long for. Whether or not you use a single- or dual-temperature method, check the roast every
1 day ago
As the cold weather sets in, bone warming soups really hit the spot. But there’s no need to pack on the heavy cream pounds when indulging in a delicious bowl of goodness. ** This is only a summary of our content.**
As the cold weather sets in, bone warming soups really hit the spot. But there’s no need to pack on the heavy cream pounds when indulging in a delicious bowl of goodness. ** This is only a summary of our content.**
1 day ago