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The intense political polarization of the United States is most clearly reflected by the dysfunctional nature of the federal government. At a more local scale, it is seen as well in the growing movement to create new states by splitting ...
The intense political polarization of the United States is most clearly reflected by the dysfunctional nature of the federal government. At a more local scale, it is seen as well in the growing movement to create new states by splitting existing ones. Most of these cases involve the desire of people in rural, conservative counties to secede from the more ...This post is from GeoCurrents
about 3 hours ago
"Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Va., 1958-63. Eero Saarinen, architect. Mobile lounges." A sort of giant rolling jetway (mostly out of frame at left) that carried passengers at Dulles from terminal to plane. The stair truck sup...
"Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Va., 1958-63. Eero Saarinen, architect. Mobile lounges." A sort of giant rolling jetway (mostly out of frame at left) that carried passengers at Dulles from terminal to plane. The stair truck supported the gangway. 120mm color transparency by Balthazar Korab. View full size.
about 6 hours ago
June 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. First aid group in school dispensary." Does the post-secondary version of this course involve beer? Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
June 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. First aid group in school dispensary." Does the post-secondary version of this course involve beer? Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
about 6 hours ago
The Franklin, or, A Political, Agricultural, and Mechanical Gazette (Washington, DC) Oct. 31, 1801. No. 1. The Franklin was published by James Lyon. Inside the front wrapper is a note from Lyon about his difficulties publishing the Frien...
The Franklin, or, A Political, Agricultural, and Mechanical Gazette (Washington, DC) Oct. 31, 1801. No. 1. The Franklin was published by James Lyon. Inside the front wrapper is a note from Lyon about his difficulties publishing the Friend of the People (Richmond, VA) and having to move to Washington before subscribers received “the full worth […]
about 9 hours ago
Today from the J Paul Getty Museum, a statuette of Mars-Cobannus dating to cAD125-175. The Latin inscription on the base reads, "Sacred to the venerable god Cobannus, Lucius Maccius Aeternus, duumvir, [dedicated this] in accordance wi...
Today from the J Paul Getty Museum, a statuette of Mars-Cobannus dating to cAD125-175. The Latin inscription on the base reads, "Sacred to the venerable god Cobannus, Lucius Maccius Aeternus, duumvir, [dedicated this] in accordance with a vow." The statue probably represents Cobannus, a local deity who was equivalent to Mars, the Roman god of war. The family of Lucius Maccius Aeternus is known from other inscriptions in Gaul.
about 17 hours ago
Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum has acquired a rare Roman sarcophagus decorated with sea creatures and engraved with a desperately sad inscription. It was made in Italy out of expensive white Carrara marble around 165-180 A.D. It...
Amherst College’s Mead Art Museum has acquired a rare Roman sarcophagus decorated with sea creatures and engraved with a desperately sad inscription. It was made in Italy out of expensive white Carrara marble around 165-180 A.D. It is 5’8″ long and has carved sea centaurs holding the inscription on both sides while sea nymphs ride on their fishy hindquarters and cupids hover in the corners. This beautiful coffin was the final resting place of two young children who left behind a despairing mother. The Latin inscription tells the tragic tale. To the departed spirits of Laberia Alexandria, who lived 10 years, 5 months, 7 days, and of Sylvanus, who lived 6 years, 5 months, 14 days. In this sarcophagus, the unhappy mother buried two bodies, her children, forever to live in sorrow. She survives her children and leads a most miserable life — her husband snatched away by death, the father of these poor little ones. The second paragraph is a four-line poem in dactylic hexameter in the original Latin. To welcome the sarcophagus to the Mead collection, Amherst alumnus, professor, former U.S. poet laureate and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Wilbur composed a new verse translation of the poem in iambic pentameter: In this sarcophagus, two children lie Whose mother’s eyes shall nevermore be dry. Her husband’s gone, who sired these luckless dears. His childless widow faces empty years. Richard Wilbur recited the poem when the sarcophagus made its official debut last month at opening of This Just In! Additions to the Collection from Pompeii to Today, an exhibition that runs through December 29th, 2013. After the exhibition is over, the sarcophagus will remain on permanent display. The Mead is very fortunate to have had the opportunity to acquire such a compelling and rare piece. One of the things that makes it so rare is that it’s in compliance with the UNESCO Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property because it left Italy in the early 20th century. Until last year, it was in the permanent collection of the Princeton University Art Museum which is where the Mead acquired it. In an era when most antiquities with a legally and ethically “clean” provenance are securely held onto by museums, the Mead was fortunate to have Sarcophagus with Sea Creatures become available for purchase. “I never imagined, in my entire career, having the opportunity to participate in a museum acquisition of such an important antiquity,” says Mead director, Dr. Elizabeth E. Barker. Given the infrequency with which works that meet the strict criteria of the UNESCO convention concerning antiquities become available to museums, Barker remains “gratefully amazed to have secured such a rare specimen for Amherst.” Its availability, says the chair of the Mead advisory board, Charles (Sandy) Wilkes, was recognized as “perhaps a once-in-a-generation opportunity to purchase a significant work that helps strengthen the Mead’s collection in a clearly important area.” It appears to have been a private sale between the two institutions, or at least, I could find no evidence of a public sale or auction, nor is anybody talking about how much money changed hands. There’s little information about the provenance of the sarcophagus either, not where it was discovered or when it exactly it was sold and exported from Italy. All we know is that it was used as a fountain or watering trough for some time before doing tours of duty as a decorative element in the courtyards of two Roman palazzos. (The sarcophagus as water fountain thing is surprisingly common. We had one in the play yard of my elementary school in Rome. Nobody thought anything of it at the time, although in hindsight it seems kind of amazing to me that we drank from a tap whose basin was an ancient coffin.) In August of this year,
about 18 hours ago
Spring 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. Social studies class. Students study in groups of six or eight, each group picking own subject." Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
Spring 1943. "Keysville, Virginia. Randolph Henry High School. Social studies class. Students study in groups of six or eight, each group picking own subject." Photo by Philip Bonn for the Office of War Information. View full size.
about 19 hours ago
I thought this was a cool speech of TR’s and not one I usually see pulled out, so I wanted to share it – TR’s “The Main with the Muck-rake.” Here is also a piece on the legacy of the speech: In a post?Watergate era, we somet...
I thought this was a cool speech of TR’s and not one I usually see pulled out, so I wanted to share it – TR’s “The Main with the Muck-rake.” Here is also a piece on the legacy of the speech: In a post?Watergate era, we sometimes hear the term "muckraker" used in more positive ways??as a label describing investigative or "watchdog" journalism that brings about positive change.64 Yet in an era of tabloid journalism that often treats gossip and rumors as "news," we may be well?advised to remember Roosevelt's distinction between "good" and "bad" muckraking. Hailing those who exposed genuine wrongdoing, Roosevelt had no objection to even to the most "merciless" exposés??so long as they were "absolutely truthful" (4). He did object to untruthful stories, however, for those only hurt the cause of progressive reform. Roosevelt's ultimate point, as summarized in perhaps the most famous line of the speech, still holds true today: "Hysterical sensationalism is the very poorest weapon wherewith to fight for lasting righteousness" (9). Roosevelt's legacy also includes a particular conception of "progress" and "progressive" reform that many still embrace. Looking to the central government to assure fairness, justice, and equal opportunity in America, many of today's self-described "progressives" embrace Roosevelt's belief that the issues facing citizens today have become too complex or too far?reaching to be managed by individuals or even by local or state governments. Like Roosevelt, many of today's progressives consider the individual helpless against the power of the big corporations, and today's progressives embrace many of the same economic, social, and political reforms championed by Roosevelt, including federally mandated conservation and the "living wage."65 Today's progressives tend to find Roosevelt's foreign policy rhetoric a bit too aggressive for their tastes, but his domestic reform efforts left a legacy of progressive politics that persists to this day.66 Finally, the moralistic rhetoric of Roosevelt and other Progressive?Era reformers still echoes in today's political discourse??for both good and ill. On the one hand, we hear echoes of Theodore Roosevelt in President Barack Obama's call for a "new era of responsibility"??an era in which a spirit of service and personal character still matter.67 On the other hand, moralistic rhetoric has led us to a seemingly endless War against Terror in which black?and?white thinking and simplistic distinctions between "good" and "evil" sometimes substitute for more nuanced deliberation. Casting the War against Terror as a moral crusade, former president George W. Bush rallied the country after the 9/11 attacks to embrace a new spirit of service and sacrifice, as a number of scholars have noted, but that spirit soon gave way to a rhetoric of polarization and division.68 Moralistic rhetoric, in other words, can be a double?edged sword; it can be used to unify and motivate people to do good things, but it also can function to oversimplify complex issues and silence dissent.
about 21 hours ago
Since the late nineteenth century, a variety of bands, orchestras, and singers have been associated with Cedar Point. Highlighted in this post are just a few of the individuals and groups associated with the resort's long, rich musical ...
Since the late nineteenth century, a variety of bands, orchestras, and singers have been associated with Cedar Point. Highlighted in this post are just a few of the individuals and groups associated with the resort's long, rich musical history. Charles Baetz an early general manager at Cedar Point, founded the Great Western Band in 1867. Baetz was born in Renghausen, Germany in 1836, where he learned the violin and cornet as a young man. In 1854 he immigrated to the United States. He was the principal musician for Company A of the 128th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. He participated in seven battles, and then returned home where he directed the military band at the federal prison on Johnson's Island, which was just across the bay from Sandusky.The Great Western Band performed at Cedar Point for concerts and dances until about 1892.The Ackley Band, founded by E.B. Ackley, was the successor to the Great Western Band. E.B. Ackley came to Sanduskyin 1893. He was the instructor of the Sandusky Band and Orchestra, and he also worked as the director of music at Cedar Point. Several members of Ackley's Band appear in the picture below, taken at Cedar Point.In 1902, E.B. Ackley published the Cedar Point Two-Step. The music was arranged for Band, Orchestra, Mandolin and Guitar, and was dedicated to the Cedar Point Pleasure Resort Company.Other compositions of sheet music dedicated to Cedar Point include Cedar Point March, by Francesco P. Russo (1910), the Cedar Point March composed by T. J. Martin (no date listed), and Cedar Point That’s the Place, composed in honor of G.A. Boeckling by J. Otto Martin in 1922. Charles Bauman was a member of both the Great Western Band and Ackley's Band. From 1914 to 1919, Leopold Adler was the popular director of the orchestra at Cedar Point. He conducted hundreds of concerts in the Coliseum. Leopold Adler composed the G.A. Boeckling March in 1916. The G.A. Boeckling March was played in the Coliseum at every concert directed by Leopold Adler.During the Great Depression and World War Two, big bands performed in the Coliseum's Grand Ballroom. Bands included: Woody Herman, Blue Barron, Guy Lombardo, Benny Goodman, and Ozzie Nelson’s band.Today several venues at Cedar Point offer live musical performances throughout the park's season. To read more about the history of Cedar Point, see the book Cedar Point: The Queen of American Watering Places, by David W. and Diane DeMali Francis (Amusement Park Books, 1995), available at the Sandusky Library.
1 day ago
1 day ago