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For the last several months, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) has teamed up with the creative geniuses at Free Range Studios to make this poignant two-minute film about the impacts of “Conflict Palm Oil” on orangutans—as seen through the ...
For the last several months, Rainforest Action Network (RAN) has teamed up with the creative geniuses at Free Range Studios to make this poignant two-minute film about the impacts of “Conflict Palm Oil” on orangutans—as seen through the eyes of a little girl communicating to an orphaned orangutan through sign language. RAN is doubling down on its campaign to protect the last wild orangutans and their rainforest homes from Conflict Palm Oil and we need lots of help to do it. Just last month, we launched our newest national campaign, The Last Stand of the Orangutan, targeting 20 of the top snack food companies using Conflict Palm Oilin their products. We’ve dubbed them The Snack Food 20, and they are companies like Pepsi, Heinz, Hershey’s, Kraft and Smucker’s—companies that control some of America’s most well-known household brands. Now we need your help: Can you share this video far and wide so it can be as effective a tool as possible for jumpstarting a national conversation about the extreme consequences hidden behind some of the common food products many of us take for granted every day? Palm oil is found in roughly half the products sold in grocery stores, and its production on vast industrial plantations is now one of the leading causes of rainforest destruction worldwide. Palm oil is the single biggest threat driving orangutans toward extinction, and is also responsible for widespread human rights violations including displacement of Indigenous Peoples, land conflicts with forest-dependent communities, and forced and child labor. On top of that, deforestation in Indonesia and Malaysia, where nearly all palm oil is grown, is responsible for more carbon pollution into earth’s atmosphere each year than all the cars, trucks, planes, trains and ships in the United States combined. In fact, due to deforestation, Indonesia has the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emissions behind only China and the United States. But we can do something about it! From moving Disney to stop sourcing paper from endangered rainforests to getting Burger King to stop using cattle grazed in the Amazon, RAN has learned well that an effective way to pressure and inspire companies to change is by nationalizing controversy over an issue and making sure the company knows that association with that issue is risky for its reputation and bottom line. This video is designed to speak to the customers that the Snack Food 20 care so much about—us—and to help catapult Conflict Palm Oil into the national consciousness in a way that The Snack Food 20 can’t ignore. The Snack Food 20 spend millions every year to instill brand loyalty and trust in their customers. They really do care what we think. It is crucial that these companies hear from you right now: Tell the Snack Food 20 that you will not stand for Conflict Palm Oil in your food. Together we can convince these brands to take action and change the destructive way Conflict Palm Oil is currently grown. Rainforest Action Network’s goal is to collect 60,600 #InYourPalm photo petitions—that’s one person standing for each orangutan remaining in the wild—to be delivered to each of the Snack Food 20 companies. RAN is demanding that each of these companies implement policies to ensure they only buy truly responsible palm oil that can be traced back to its source and is not driving deforestation, expansion onto carbon-rich peatlands or human and labor rights violations. Orangutans are among our closest relatives in the animal kingdom. They are amazingly like us in how they learn, play, and care for their young. But unlike us, if their homes are destroyed they cannot move on. We believe the power to save these incredible orangutans is in your palm. Please share this short film with your friends and family today and ask them to do the same! Originally published by RAN. Enjoy stories like this one? Got $25?  Help keep Civil Eats alive by supporting our Kickstarter Campaign before October 18.
about 3 hours ago
It used to be said when the U.S. sneezes the world catches a cold, referring to the global impact of the U.S. economy and financial markets. However its influence has declined and the stalemate in Washington isn't helping any. President ...
It used to be said when the U.S. sneezes the world catches a cold, referring to the global impact of the U.S. economy and financial markets. However its influence has declined and the stalemate in Washington isn't helping any. President Obama canceled a trip to the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit in Bali, Indonesia, this week [...]
about 7 hours ago
The apologies came from Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans, who acknowledged that the rights of Russian minister-counselor Dmitry Borodin had been infringed by the local police. Borodin said he was badly beaten by unidentified men ...
The apologies came from Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans, who acknowledged that the rights of Russian minister-counselor Dmitry Borodin had been infringed by the local police. Borodin said he was badly beaten by unidentified men in camouflage uniform who forced their way into his flat in The Hague on Saturday evening. He was then taken to a police station and held for a number of hours without any explanation.  Borodin went on to say that the men did not produce any official documents showing they were policemen. Moreover, the men ignored Borodin when he said he was a diplomat. The incident provoked strong reaction from the Russian government, with President Vladimir Putin demanding official explanation. "We are awaiting an explanation, an apology and also punishment of those responsible," Putin said at a news conference after an Asia-Pacific summit in Indonesia. He added that Russia would react depending on the course of action the Dutch side takes.  DETAILS TO FOLLOW
about 8 hours ago
by Benjamin Pearson • October 2013 Arrington de Dionyso, in his project Malaikat dan Singa, wants to explore music’s potential to bend time and space and induce trancelike states. He also wants to show you how R...
by Benjamin Pearson • October 2013 Arrington de Dionyso, in his project Malaikat dan Singa, wants to explore music’s potential to bend time and space and induce trancelike states. He also wants to show you how “guttural throatsinging, dancehall rhythms, post-punk ‘Beefheartian’ guitars, growling bass clarinet, and Indonesian scales” can all actually fit together in the same song. It’s sorta fitting, then, that this present interview stitches together different mediums and times; it began over a year and a half ago and was conducted in person, over the phone, and through email. When this interview first started, Arrington and I talked at length about his first trip to Indonesia, funded by a Kickstarter campaign back in 2011. The trip resulted in a Lil B-like downpour of fascinating collaborative recordings released on Arrington’s Bandcamp page and has profoundly influenced his musical and artistic output since. Now, he’s gearing up for round two: his new Kickstarter campaign, which ends Friday night (October 11), aims to help him to reconnect with the musicians he met the first time around to collaborate on public performances, recording sessions, and workshops. If it’s half as productive as his last trip, it will result in enough music to fill up my Samsung Galaxy S4. But even more importantly, it’s a chance for one of America’s musicians who’s most critically and creatively engaged with “non-Western music” to continue his unique, much-needed explorations of cultural appropriation, exoticism, “World music,” and, of course, the crowd-pleasing qualities of angel semen. So, what’s in the vial that you and your bandmates drank from before the show I saw you at recently? In the vial? Oooooh. Well, it’s kind of fun to keep a little bit of an air of mystery, but I will say it’s perfectly legal and available at any co-op or health food store. It’s just a tincture that aids in overall endurance and stamina and, you know, helps us get our game on to be wild and funky. And it helps with your prostate, too. Oh, nice! We’re all men here; we have to protect our stuff. Yeah, we’re getting older. We are getting older, yeah. How did you become interested in Indonesia? From a young age I’ve always had a tendency to dive into the most obscure, locally unknown music that I could find, from what would be the “ethnic” music section of the library. And at the same time been really involved in the D.I.Y. punk scene when I was a teenager. I’d go to punk shows on the weekends, and then on weekdays after school, I’d go to the library and listen to records from Mali, Morocco — any faraway place. Especially Indonesia, because in 1989 or so a family friend participated in an artists’ residency program and traveled a bit through Bali and Java. She knew I’d be excited to hear some “exotic” sounds and brought back a few cassettes for me to enjoy featuring “Jaipongan” music, it’s tricky to explain too briefly but basically this was an urban contemporary hybrid musical form that came into being directly via government sponsorship. The intention was to create a dance-able urban “pop” music without Western influence so as to attract young people away from the corruption of the rock and roll from the US and UK that permeated the airwaves in the early 60s. A genetically engineered music, if you will — Jaipongan showcases incredible rhythmic complexity, abrupt changes in the beat are punctuated by virtuosic displays of rapid-fire drum play led by the kendang player, but even as the chaos can seem to increase, each cycle is measured by the enormous low sound of the giant “gong degung.” I fell in love with this cassette tape. A year or so after that my mother took a business trip to the Caribbean and brought h
about 8 hours ago
Source: stock.xchng Sweden’s first, second, third, and fourth national pension reserve funds (AP1-AP4) will divest all their holdings in Wal-Mart Stores (NYSE:WMT), Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. (NYSE:FCX), Incitec Pivot, an...
Source: stock.xchng Sweden’s first, second, third, and fourth national pension reserve funds (AP1-AP4) will divest all their holdings in Wal-Mart Stores (NYSE:WMT), Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc. (NYSE:FCX), Incitec Pivot, and Potash Corp. (NYSE:POT) following a recommendation from the country’s Ethical Council. The council reports that after years of engaging with the companies over various dubious labor and environmental practices, all had failed to deliver substantive changes. For some context, the AP1-AP4 funds represent four out of five so-called “buffer funds” within the Swedish national pension system. The sixth fund, AP6, invests in private equity. These funds are state owned and managed by a government-appointed board of directors but operate fairly independently of the regular bureaucratic machinery. The funds are required by law to “manage their assets so as to generate maximum benefit for the income-based retirement system,” with a focus on long-term returns and low risk. Each of the funds receives one quarter of the social security contributions made to the pension system, and in turn, each fund is responsible for paying one quarter of benefits due from the system. As of the end of 2011, the five funds (AP1-AP4 plus AP6) claimed total assets of 873 billion Swedish krona (about $136 billion), or 27 percent of Sweden’s 2011 gross domestic product. Each fund pursues a different investment strategy — a breakdown of their portfolios is beyond the scope of this article — but broadly speaking, the funds invest heavily in equities. Below is a breakdown of the asset allocation among public pension reserve funds in various countries. At a glance, it’s easy to see that Sweden’s various AP funds hold an enormous amount of shares and other equities compared to most other funds. The funds are required to hold a minimum 30 percent of assets in interest-bearing securities with low risk. As of June 30, AP1 owned 76,923 shares of Wal-Mart; AP2 did not appear to own any shares; AP3 owned 353,008 shares; and AP4 owned 660,359 shares. As a result of the recommendation of the Ethical Council, the funds will remove Wal-Mart — along with Freeport-McMoRan, Incitec Pivot, and Potash — from their portfolios. The council explained that it recommended exclusion of Wal-Mart because its U.S. business “is linked to systematic abuses of workers’ rights, in contravention of the ILO core convention on working rights. The company also denies employees their right to form and join trade unions.” With about 1 million shares between them, the AP funds are not among Wal-Mart’s major shareholders, though they are in the top 150 as of June 30. The council recommended that Freeport McMoRan be removed for failing to address the negative environmental impact of its mining activities in Indonesia. Initec Pivot and Potash, both major purchasers of phosphate from a supplier that mines in the Western Sahara, were recommended for removal because of civil rights violations by that supplier. The AP funds use the Ethical Council for guidance, but they are primarily obligated to invest in such a way that produces maximum return — however, Wal-Mart, Freeport McMoRan, and Potash have all underperformed the S&P 500 over the past two-year period, putting little pressure on the funds to remain attached to the investments. “Engagement is the Ethical Council’s primary tool for encouraging companies to act responsibly,” Christina Kusoffsky Hillesöy, the Ethical Council’s chair, said. “Exclusion from the investment portfolio is a last resort when other avenues have not worked. This is therefore a setback for us in so far as we have been unable to secure lasting improvements despite several years of active engagement. We do not believe further interaction with these companies will be fruitful and have therefore recommended that th
about 9 hours ago
News: women are the world's "fastest emerging market" and will transform the design of everything from products to interiors, according to a leading design strategist. "What's the fastest emerging market?" said Tim Kobe, founder and CEO ...
News: women are the world's "fastest emerging market" and will transform the design of everything from products to interiors, according to a leading design strategist. "What's the fastest emerging market?" said Tim Kobe, founder and CEO of Singapore-based Eight Inc. "It's not China, it's not Brazil, it's not India, it's not Indonesia. It's actually women." "Globally, women are probably the greatest growth opportunity," added Kobe, who has developed design strategies for companies including Apple, Virgin Atlantic and Citibank. Kobe, best known for helping Apple develop its retail strategy, made the comments in an interview with Dezeen at the Inside interior design festival, part of the World Architecture Festival in Singapore last week. "One of the things that we've seen with the companies that we work with is that traditionally the brand really focuses on the functional aspects, and to a large degree thats really targeted towards a male's sensibility and behaviour," Kobe said. "But as women become more and more influential in the marketplace, so places like hotels and airlines and retail have to shift towards more of an emotional brand ideal versus a functional brand ideal." Kobe made the comments in an interview following a discussion on luxury design at the Inside Festival, chaired by Dezeen editor-in-chief Marcus Fairs. Also taking part in the discussion was Paul Wiste, Asia Pacific regional director of development and design for luxury resort group Jumeirah, who spoke of the growing importance of women travellers to the luxury resort chain. The group recently introduced women-only floors at some of its Middle Eastern resorts, anticipating demand from Saudi women. "But it's been completely booked out by groups of Western women," he said. Sadie Morgan of dRMM: "Women are the next big thing" Main image: Tim Kobe Architect Sadie Morgan of London practice dRMM, another Inside festival speaker, agreed with Kobe's comments. "I think women are the next big thing," she said. "Women are now much more self-possessed, we have the ability, we are professionals, we have the money and my goodness do we have the energy." Five years ago it was the pink pound," she said, referring to the emergence of gay consumers as an economic force. "Women are the next big spending power." "We are absolutely fired up, our generation, and we want spaces that reflect our needs and our preoccupations. People building hotels, retail, housing have to start responding to a much more feminine community." In 2009, women controlled an estimated 27% of global wealth, worth $20 trillion, according to a 2010 report by Boston Consulting Group. The figure has been rising by 8% per year and will soon outstrip the combined economies of India and China. The number of women in the global workforce doubled between 1980 and 2008 to 1.2 billion and continues to grow, while their earnings are catching up with those of men. Kobe said that the growing influence of women would improve design. "I think we're going to see a lot more work in that area, where people are actually focusing on the female customer and delivering an experience that's actually better for everyone," he said. "Women tend to have a different set of sensibilities and I think its going to change all of those categories." Kobe said he is working with hospitality industry clients who have already identified this shift and are starting to redesign hotels around the needs of women as a result. "If you look at the way most hotels have been set up, it's for male business travellers," he said. "There's the typical bars, there's the typical location, there's the fundamentals of the experience that are there to cater to the male business traveller. "When that becomes a female business traveller, the ways that you interact with them, the kinds of experiences that they're looking for, the issues of sanitation, all of these components that are part of the hospitality experience have to be considered differently and that'
about 9 hours ago
Asian treasures on display at Vietnam History Museum VietNamNet Bridge - An exhibition entitled “Asia-Colorful Culture” will open on October 8 at the Vietnam National Museum of History, displaying nearly 100 ancient treasures of many ...
Asian treasures on display at Vietnam History Museum VietNamNet Bridge - An exhibition entitled “Asia-Colorful Culture” will open on October 8 at the Vietnam National Museum of History, displaying nearly 100 ancient treasures of many Asian countries like India, South Korea, Indonesia, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and China. The exhibits include architectural materials, household appliances, ornaments, and worship objects made from such materials as bronze, clay, stone, terra cotta, wood, silver, gem and ivory. The host country’s exhibits are bronze worship objects dating back to the Le-Nguyen Dynasty in the 15th-19th century. The exhibition will run through January 2014. The exhibition is held on the occasion of the 4th Conference of Asian National Museum Association 2013 (ANMA 4). The event, with the theme “Museums Contribute to Social Change,” will take place from October 7-9 at the Vietnam National Museum of History. This item is made of gold, pearl and crystal (Vietnam, Nguyen Dynasty, 19-20th centuries). Pottery vase of Vietnam, Later Le Dynasty, 15th century. This item was salvaged from an ancient shipwreck in Cham Island, Hoi An twon, Quang Nam province. Earrings made of gem stone and glass of Vietnam, Sa Huynh culture, about 2500-2000 years ago. Earrings made of gem stone and glass of Vietnam, Dong Nai culture, about 2500-2000 years ago, from the Giong Ca Vo archaelogical site in Ho Chi Minh City. The Vishnu of Cambodia, Angkor period, 11-12th centuries. Wooden statue of a dancer of Cambodia, 19-20th centuries. Silver enamel inlaid bowl of Cambodia, 19th century. Rectangular box decorated with leaf and geometric patterns, made of wood inlaid with mother-of-pearl of Cambodia, 19th century. Polygonal box decorated with flowers and geometric patterns, made of wood inlaid with mother-of-pearl and glass of Cambodia, 19th century. Pen holder carved with 18 Buddhas of China, the Qing Dynasty, Qianlong reign (1736-1795). The gem item from China, the Qing Dynasty, 18th century. Pillow made of gem from China, the Qing Dynasty, 18th century. Avalokitesvara stone reliefs of India, Pala Empire, the 10th century. Bronze statue of Kuan-yin of India in the 17-18th centuries. Colorful ceramic plates of Japan, Edo period, Kutani style, 17-18th centuries. Shiva on the back of Nandin bull statue, made of gold-plated bronze of Thailand, 19th century. Silver bowl of Thai Lan, Chakri period, 19th century. Bencharong multi-colored ceramic bowl of Thailand, the Chakri period, 18-19th centuries. T. Le
about 12 hours ago
DEAR DIANE ,WE WENT INTO UBUD´S TROPICAL PARADISE ON AN ADVENTURE TO SHOW YOU SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL MAGICAL AND ECO FRIENDLY PLACES  IN THE CULTURAL CAPITAL OF INDONESIA . FEATURING SUNGLASSES FROM CAST EYEWEAR  WEAR IT LOUD AND PRO...
DEAR DIANE ,WE WENT INTO UBUD´S TROPICAL PARADISE ON AN ADVENTURE TO SHOW YOU SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL MAGICAL AND ECO FRIENDLY PLACES  IN THE CULTURAL CAPITAL OF INDONESIA . FEATURING SUNGLASSES FROM CAST EYEWEAR  WEAR IT LOUD AND PROUD !  IMAGES COURTESY OF ANGGA PRATAMA AND MODEL HELENE JANSEN STYLED BY FA EMPEL  . THANK YOU FOR THE FACILITIES AND ATTENTION TO BAMBU INDAH  .  HOPING YOU COME AND VISIT US ! XX
about 12 hours ago
Indonesian gastronomy cover, posted on September 26, 2013 from Jakarta Selatan to Taipei with arrival postmarked on October 8, 2013.
Indonesian gastronomy cover, posted on September 26, 2013 from Jakarta Selatan to Taipei with arrival postmarked on October 8, 2013.
about 13 hours ago
BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN, Brunei (AP) — Southeast Asian leaders opened an annual summit with Asia-Pacific counterparts on Wednesday, a gathering where China was expected to take advantage of the absence of the U.S. president to showcase its r...
BANDAR SERI BEGAWAN, Brunei (AP) — Southeast Asian leaders opened an annual summit with Asia-Pacific counterparts on Wednesday, a gathering where China was expected to take advantage of the absence of the U.S. president to showcase its rising global clout and promote trade yet still talk tough on regional territorial disputes. President Barack Obama was forced to cancel a four-nation swing through Southeast Asia, including attendance at the ASEAN meeting and an earlier summit in Bali, Indonesia, to grapple with a budget deadlock that sparked a partial shutdown of the U.S. government. Chinese and Philippine diplomats squabbled Tuesday over the wording of a paragraph on the territorial rifts in a joint statement to be issued by Chinese and ASEAN leaders after they meet on Wednesday, two Filipino diplomats told The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to reporters.
about 15 hours ago