Interview with the Vampire

add news feed

tweet a story

Long work day...We're gonna go out for a bite, care to join us? -TeamTC
Long work day...We're gonna go out for a bite, care to join us? -TeamTC
about 1 hour ago
Episode 1.04 which was previous called "Interview with the Vampire" is now called "Girl in New Orleans"
Episode 1.04 which was previous called "Interview with the Vampire" is now called "Girl in New Orleans"
4 days ago
Film Screenings & Events Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles 1994. USA. Neil Jordan. 123 min. In the Film exhibition Dante Ferretti: Des...
Film Screenings & Events Interview with the Vampire: The Vampire Chronicles 1994. USA. Neil Jordan. 123 min. In the Film exhibition Dante Ferretti: Designing for the Big Screen
10 days ago
CBS is working on a small screen adaptation of the Anne Rice novel Angel Time. The novel from the acclaimed author of Interview with the Vampire is part of her Songs of the Seraphim series. According to Worst Previews, Rice penned the bo...
CBS is working on a small screen adaptation of the Anne Rice novel Angel Time. The novel from the acclaimed author of Interview with the Vampire is part of her Songs of the Seraphim series. According to Worst Previews, Rice penned the book during her return to the Catholic faith. Deadline is reporting that Memphis Beat writers Joshua Harto and Liz Garcia will tackle the script on Angel Time. Anne Rice will reportedly serve as executive producer on the series. Reports suggest that The A-Team and The Grey director Joe Carnahan will direct the pilot episode of Angel Time. The talented filmmaker will also executive producer the show alongside Anne Rice. The series will follow the adventures of an assassin who decides to seek salvation after bumping into an angel. After reaching an agreement with the otherworldly being, the hitman is transformed into a priest and transported back to the 13th century England. Here’s how Amazon describes the book: “It’s the present day. Toby O’Dare—aka Lucky the Fox—is a contract killer of underground fame on assignment to kill once again. He’s a soulless soul, a dead man walking. His nightmarish world of lone and lethal missions is disrupted when a mysterious stranger, a seraph, offers him a chance to save rather than destroy lives. O’Dare, who long ago dreamt of being a priest, seizes his chance. Now he is carried back through the ages to thirteenth-century England, to dark realms where accusations of ritual murder have been made against Jews, where children suddenly die or disappear. In this primitive setting, O’Dare begins his perilous quest for salvation, a journey of danger and flight, loyalty and betrayal, selflessness and love.” Angel Time isn’t the only Anne Rice-related project currently in development. Variety reported earlier this summer that FilmDistrict will help bring the novel Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt to the big screen. Cyrus Nowrasteh is slated to direct. What do you think about CBS developing Anne Rice’s Angel Time as a series? [Image via Marshall University] Anne Rice’s ‘Angel Time’ Headed To CBS is a post from: The Inquisitr News
11 days ago
Neil Jordan‘s movies so often make me feel like I’m looking not into a mirror, but through one, perhaps from the inside. The world I’m looking at is always on the edge of being recognisable, and the characters seem to h...
Neil Jordan‘s movies so often make me feel like I’m looking not into a mirror, but through one, perhaps from the inside. The world I’m looking at is always on the edge of being recognisable, and the characters seem to have understandable, relatable hearts and minds, but something is always out of joint. Sometimes, his films have a very pronounced feeling of the unconscious or the surreal. One of these is his latest, Byzantium, a remarkable new vampire story set on the British coast in two separate timelines. I called him up last week to discuss the making of the film, which was apparently rather troubled. We also spoke about his ongoing interest in the horror genre, the success of modern cable television and where he’s planning to go next. I think his answers were amongst the most candid and interesting I’ve ever received. So here’s some of what Jordan had to tell me, starting with his comments on why he chose to accept this particular job. I liked the script, I liked the way it played with time, I liked that it was about a girl trying to tell her story. Because [Moira Buffini] is a playwright and because her voice is quite distinctive I didn’t get involved in the writing, though I normally do. I just decided, on that level, to take a bit of a backseat. It was her play as well so, had it been an original screenplay or an adaptation of somebody else’s work, I would have gotten involved but I didn’t want to. In a strange way it was part and parcel of the charm of the screenplay that I read was that it was written in this old fashioned 18th Century language. As a director I take the whole package, though I’m aware there are faults, there are clunky elements in the storytelling. If I had insisted on being part of the writing process maybe that would have changed, maybe it would have been made worse, I don’t know. She [Buffini] was so willing to collaborate. The first draft I read was much more like the play and I felt that she was afraid of it being a vampire story so I asked her to bring those elements much closer to the fore. She wrote another draft, very quickly, that changed that. She’s a really interesting writer and it was interesting writing with her and I decided I’d rather work this way than just do a draft myself. I wanted to make a horror film. In the first draft that I read there was somehow a little bit of feeling that Eleanor’s story could have been evidence of a deranged mind, a young teenage girl’s fantasies, but yet the period stuff was presented as though it was real and true. But that couldn’t be the case because if it was a girl’s fantasy, the period stuff would be as unreliable as every other piece of the story she’s telling. There was a dichotomy there, and I don’t think the story knew quite what it was in the first draft I read. I felt Moira was afraid of it being a horror film. I wouldn’t say the film is horrific. Not at all. We see people being killed and see blood spouting, but it’s not a horror movie in the way that Saw is or Evil Dead is, but it belongs to the vampire genre. I don’t know if I like horror movies. I made Company of Wolves, I made Interview with the Vampire, I made In Dreams and I made this. It’s because I like stories that are about unreal things, about reality and fantasy but that confuse the two, that force you to question the nature of reality. I suppose that’s why I’ve made so many horror movies. And sometimes horror movies can do things that no other movie can do, they can take you into places that are the strangest places to be, when you suddenly realise “How did I get into this?” And as a director, horror movies allow you to create images that are out of your dreams, out of pure fantasy, images that have nothing to do with reality. Imagining Byzantium was very simple. The main thing I needed was a seaside town and that kind of atmosphere. You know the way Venice is a character in Don’t Look Now, I needed a town that had that, or the way New Orlea
15 days ago
Here is an interview with The Vampire Diaries own Ian Somerhalder.
Here is an interview with The Vampire Diaries own Ian Somerhalder.
20 days ago
From its seductively scuffed seaside setting to its scarlet waterfall, Neil Jordan’s return to bloody fantasy majors in memorable images but suffers from muddled intent.   Gemma Arterton and Saoirse Ronan make full-blooded work of vam...
From its seductively scuffed seaside setting to its scarlet waterfall, Neil Jordan’s return to bloody fantasy majors in memorable images but suffers from muddled intent.   Gemma Arterton and Saoirse Ronan make full-blooded work of vamps-on-the-run Clara and Eleanor. There’s added complexity too in Eleanor’s storytelling streak – echoing unreliable narrators in Jordan’s The Company Of Wolves and Interview With The Vampire – though too many subplots sap the momentum.   What isn’t lost is mood, thanks to Jordan’s real star: DoP Sean Bobbitt, who draws melancholy magic from darkest Hastings.
23 days ago
“@scarfmansmel: Okay, so what song is it that Lestat plays when he’s playing the piano when Claudia sees he’s back?
“@scarfmansmel: Okay, so what song is it that Lestat plays when he’s playing the piano when Claudia sees he’s back?
about 1 month ago
US 122m, Colour Director: Neil Jordan; Cast: Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Antonio Banderas, Stephen Rea, Christian Slater, Kirsten Dunst A film adaptation of the 1976 Anne Rice novel, Interview with the Vampire is a dark and entertaining horro...
US 122m, Colour Director: Neil Jordan; Cast: Tom Cruise, Brad Pitt, Antonio Banderas, Stephen Rea, Christian Slater, Kirsten Dunst A film adaptation of the 1976 Anne Rice novel, Interview with the Vampire is a dark and entertaining horror film that is narrated by Louis de Pointe du Lac, who tells his “life” story to a reporter in modern-day San Francisco. Louis’ tale begins with his turning in 1791, and his maker Lestat’s dismay at his reluctance to feed on human blood. Following a series of tragic events, which includes the making of Claudia, a 12-year-old vampire, Louis’ fantastic tales eventually convince the reporter that he is actually telling the truth. Both the novel and the movie helped remake the vampire genre and paved the way for its revival in film and television (Klaus Ming August 2013).
about 1 month ago
@vf5280 You've been a very, very, VERY bad girl! #BiteMe #Lestat #TeamTC
@vf5280 You've been a very, very, VERY bad girl! #BiteMe #Lestat #TeamTC
about 1 month ago