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While Corona SDK has been hugely popular among game developers, more and more developers are discovering Corona as an ideal tool for business applications. From revolutionizing real estate with NuOffer to tracking fertility and ovulation...
While Corona SDK has been hugely popular among game developers, more and more developers are discovering Corona as an ideal tool for business applications. From revolutionizing real estate with NuOffer to tracking fertility and ovulation with My Days, there are hundreds of fantastic Corona-powered business apps and utilities in the wild. To show you just a few of the neat business-related elements you can incorporate with Corona SDK, we’ve put together an iOS 7-friendly sample business app with essentials including tableViews, webViews, maps and more. Our sample business app includes a menu via a tab bar controller at the bottom of the screen with buttons for the Corona blog, pictures, videos and maps. The sample app also includes several Corona SDK widgets including widget.newTableView, widget.newTabBar and widget.newButton, and demonstrates how to use networking to download server data. Take a look inside: Blog posts: The app fetches the RSS feed from Corona’s blog. Using this data, it populates the posts into a widget.newTableView. You can scroll up and down to see all the latest posts, tap on each entry for more details and interact with links within individual blog posts via a native.newWebView. Photo gallery: The photo gallery includes a set of thumbnails that mirror an iPhone photo gallery, complete with a slider. Video: The video section provides a list of recent videos from Corona Labs’ YouTube channel. Please note: The videos will not play in the Corona Simulator. The videos will play on the device directly and allow you to turn the devices sideways for full-screen viewing. Custom map: Our map pins Corona’s Palo Alto headquarters along with three local Starbucks, charted with custom markers. You can zoom in, rotate the map, see a satellite view, and more. Please note: The map is not viewable in the Corona Simulator, however is viewable when you build to your device. Here are a few screenshots from the app: Custom Map Video Blog As you can see, our sample covers just a few of the essentials, but the possibilities are endless. Get your hands on the code by downloading the file from GitHub. Please note: We’ve created a new thread in the forum called Business App Discussion. Please post any questions you may have there. Thank you!
about 3 hours ago
Featured iPhone Development Resources,iOS UI Controls,iPad,iPhone,Objective-C I’ve mentioned some nice open source UIAlertView replacement components such as this flat style alert view component featuring customizable animations. ...
Featured iPhone Development Resources,iOS UI Controls,iPad,iPhone,Objective-C I’ve mentioned some nice open source UIAlertView replacement components such as this flat style alert view component featuring customizable animations. Here’s an open source UIAlertView type component called CXAlertView from Chris Xu that has a wide number of customizations available. By default CXAlertView looks by default like a native alert view, but you can customize it with UIAppearance, add in an images, add in more buttons, use image buttons and more. Here’s an image showing CXAlertView in action: You can find CXAlertView on Github here. A nice component if you would like to create custom UIAlertViews. Be the first to comment... Related Posts:Open Source: Non-Annoying UIAlertView Replacement Styled After TweetBot’s Alert PanelsOpen Source Completely Customizable iPhone UIAlertView Replacement ControlOpen Source Component For Creating Highly Customizable iOS 7 Style Action SheetsEasily Customizable UIAlertView Replacement With Support For A Blocks-Based SyntaxOpen Source iOS Library For Highly Customizable Animated Semi-Modal Views Original article: Highly Customizable iOS 7 Style UIAlertview Replacement Component©2013 iOS App Dev Libraries, Controls, Tutorials, Examples and Tools. All Rights Reserved.
about 15 hours ago
@emilysipiora Haha you need to right now
@emilysipiora Haha you need to right now
about 18 hours ago
Today, I’m very happy to announce we are making a Beta of Graphics 2.0 available to Corona SDK Pro and Enterprise subscribers! Cinema-quality graphics in your pocket Our goal with Graphics 2.0 was to enable you to produce cinemati...
Today, I’m very happy to announce we are making a Beta of Graphics 2.0 available to Corona SDK Pro and Enterprise subscribers! Cinema-quality graphics in your pocket Our goal with Graphics 2.0 was to enable you to produce cinematic-quality graphics in your mobile apps. We wanted to build a system that let you combine the elements of great visual effects — vector geometry, image processing, motion graphics. I can’t tell you how many times I wished the graphics capabilities in Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and After Effects worked seamlessly as a single system, rather than as individual products that you had to switch between. So when we built the Graphics 2.0 we designed everything to interoperate seamlessly. For example, you’ll be able to create all sorts of polygon shapes (convex or concave). Fill the interior of the shape with whatever you want — images, gradients, frames of a texture atlas, and even procedurally-generated textures. And then do the same with strokes. Then apply any of over 80 Photoshop-quality effects, and tween the parameters of those effects to your heart’s content. In coming weeks, we’ll be giving you more examples so you can really leverage the full expressive power of our new engine. Use a more recent browser version to see the cool animation of this sample app. The crazy thing is we still have a ton of features we haven’t gotten to, like more complex mesh geometry and features that we’re still experimenting with, like feeding a live camera directly into any shape and bouncing those shapes around like physics objects. Throughout all of this, we wanted to build a system that stayed true to the Corona way of doing things. A system that was designed to be simple as possible (with apologies to Einstein), but no simpler. A system that enabled you to achieve amazing visual effects without a Hollywood-sized budget. A system that lets you feel like you’re not just pushing pixels, you’re painting with light. Ready to get started? Okay, now it’s your turn to start playing with Graphics 2.0 – let us know what you think! Here’s what you need to know: First, we have a special Graphics 2.0 Daily Build Page. If you’re a Corona SDK Pro or Enterprise subscriber, you should have permissions to access the page. And if you don’t have access, now’s a great time to upgrade! (Windows users note that the MSI will install in a different folder called “Corona SDK – Graphics 2.0 Beta”.) Next, head on over to our Graphics 2.0 Guide which talks about what’s new and touches on a few differences you need to be aware of. Finally, we have a special Graphics 2.0 Forum for feedback! System requirements Graphics 2.0 relies on proper GPU support, in particular OpenGL-ES 2.0. That has implications for using the Corona Simulator on the desktop. Most modern Macs and PCs will easily surpass the OpenGL-ES 2.0 spec, but we live in the world of technology, where today’s state-of-the-art quickly becomes obsolete. I mention this because there will be computers that do not have the right GPU horsepower to run the Corona Simulator. Same goes for virtual machine environments that do not fully virtualize the GPU of the host machine. Beta quality Keep in mind this is a Beta, so your mileage will vary. While a lot of pieces are mature, you will almost certainly encounter bugs. We’ll be actively monitoring the forums. In addition, we’ve compiled a list of known issues. So given all this, it’s probably a little early to be shipping your app with Graphics 2.0. Of course, more power to you if you think everything works! In the meantime, we’ll be polishing, polishing, polishing. We’ll be continuously refining this Beta until it becomes the next public release. Contest! On next Monday’s (October 14) Corona Geek, I’ll be on to talk about Graphics 2.0 and will announce
about 22 hours ago
Featured iPhone Development Resources,iOS UI Controls,iPad,iPhone,Objective-C I’ve mentioned a few controls for making slide-out side panels, most recently JASidePanels. Here’s a new panel style view controller called MCPane...
Featured iPhone Development Resources,iOS UI Controls,iPad,iPhone,Objective-C I’ve mentioned a few controls for making slide-out side panels, most recently JASidePanels. Here’s a new panel style view controller called MCPanelViewController from Matthew Cheok. MCPanelViewController features a nice clean iOS 7 style view with a semi-transparent background and blurring. You can adjust the size of the panel, and items adjust the level of blurring to match the built in iOS 7 styles, and you can also change the tint of the background if desired. The panel is opened either programmatically or with a screen edge gesture. Here’s an image from the readme showing MCPanelViewController in action: You can find MCPanelViewController on Github here. A nice slide panel control if you’re looking to keep the look of your app consistent with iOS 7. Be the first to comment... Related Posts:Open Source Custom iOS Sliding Panel Control That Works Within Xcode’s StoryboardsOpen Source Drawer-Style Navigation Controller With Customizable TransitionsOpen Source Component For Making A Nice iOS 7 Control Center Style Animated Side Bar MenuLibrary Allowing You To Create A Slide-Out iOS 7 Style Frosted ViewBest Resources In iOS Development – July 2nd, 2012 Original article: Open Source Slide-Out Side Panel View Controller With Clean iOS 7 Style And Blurring©2013 iOS App Dev Libraries, Controls, Tutorials, Examples and Tools. All Rights Reserved.
about 23 hours ago
@PetrusLundqvist @aral "80 to 90 percent of all downloaded apps are used once and then eventually deleted by users"
@PetrusLundqvist @aral "80 to 90 percent of all downloaded apps are used once and then eventually deleted by users"
208 3 days ago
When people first start programming, they quickly learn that writing all of their code in one large chunk becomes difficult to manage. As such, programming languages support a concept called functions which allow the programmer to direct...
When people first start programming, they quickly learn that writing all of their code in one large chunk becomes difficult to manage. As such, programming languages support a concept called functions which allow the programmer to direct parts of the program to perform a specific task. In addition to writing clean, organized code, functions are the foundation behind the concept of DRY or “Don’t Repeat Yourself.” If you find yourself writing the same basic block of code multiple times, with only minor differences in each block, using a function is probably in order. Also, any time you want to do the same thing multiple times, a function is usually the best approach. “Similar Task” Functions Let’s consider a scenario where we only need to change a small portion of code around a single data value: local tanx = math.abs( 12 ) / math.abs( 15 ) local atanx = math.atan( tanx ) -- result in radians local angle = atanx * 180 / math.pi -- converted to degrees print( angle ) tanx = math.abs( 34 ) / math.abs( -16 ) atanx = math.atan( tanx ) -- result in radians angle = atanx * 180 / math.pi -- converted to degrees print( angle ) tanx = math.abs( 80 ) / math.abs( -4 ) atanx = math.atan( tanx ) -- result in radians angle = atanx * 180 / math.pi -- converted to degrees print( angle ) In this code, we are simply calculating an angle based on the width and height of a triangle. As you can see, this code becomes repetitive — we are basically doing the exact same thing several times over, changing only the parameters of the triangle each time. This is a prime example of where a function is useful. Let’s look at a re-write of this code using a function: local function calculateAngle( sideA, sideB ) local tanx = math.abs( sideB ) / math.abs( sideA ) local atanx = math.atan( tanx ) -- result in radians local anglex = atanx * 180 / math.pi -- converted to degrees return angle end -- print( calculateAngle( 15, 12 ) ) print( calculateAngle( -16, 34 ) ) print( calculateAngle( -4, 80 ) ) Notice that we have written the basic code just once, but we use variables to do the calculations. After the function block, we take the value of the variable angle, returned by the function, and print its value to the Terminal/console. Sending Data In Functions don’t require parameters (data) passed to them, nor are they required to return (send back) any data when they execute. In most cases, however, you will need the function to act on some specific data like the sideA and sideB values passed to the angle calculator above. Data is sent to functions as parameters, or “arguments” as some developers refer to them. These are passed to the function as a comma-separated list of values or variables: local picWidth = 32 local pic = display.newImageRect( "pic.png", picWidth, 64 ) In this example, we call a common Corona function, display.newImageRect(), and pass to it: a string value a variable a number Spacing between the commas doesn’t matter, but string values must be passed within quotes, while variables must be passed without quotes. Other items can be passed as well, including tables of data and even other functions. Essentially, any valid Lua data type can be passed to a Lua function. Let’s look at some examples: local result = myFunction( "somestring" ) local myString = "somestring" local result = myFunction( myString ) These two cases are identical in behavior, except that the sole parameter is pre-declared as the variable myString in the second example. Here are some other equivalent cases: local result = myFunction( 10 ) local myNumber = 10 local result = myFunction( myNumber ) And here’s an equivalent which passes in a table: local result = myFunction( {1, 2, 3} ) local myTable = {} table[1] = 1 table[2] = 2 table[3] = 3 local result = myFunction( myTable ) When you create the function, list all of the parameters you expect to
1 day ago
Today’s guest tutorial comes to you courtesy of Matt Webster, an aspiring mobile app developer and veteran of Corona SDK. He’s been involved with .NET-based websites for many years and currently manages mobile app-related web...
Today’s guest tutorial comes to you courtesy of Matt Webster, an aspiring mobile app developer and veteran of Corona SDK. He’s been involved with .NET-based websites for many years and currently manages mobile app-related web services in London. With a passion for physics, Matt has contributed numerous posts and code samples to the Corona Code Share, listed on his sporadic technical blog. You can follow Matt on Twitter here. While Corona SDK is simple, powerful, and has many useful APIs, sometimes there’s that “one extra little thing” you wish was there. Often, that one thing is apparently simple enough to be incorporated into an existing Lua API, but it may appear “forgotten about.” In this tutorial, we’ll learn how to: Add new functionality to the existing libraries. Extend the existing functionality. Corona API Libraries The core functionality of Corona SDK is provided by API libraries, the documentation for which is found here: http://docs.coronalabs.com/api/index.html If we take a look at the string library, we see a collection of functions: string.byte() string.char() string.find() string.format() etc… It so happens that these functions are not written in Lua; instead, they are “hooks” into lower-level functionality written in either Objective-C (iOS) or Java (Android). The same is true for the math, graphics , and other libraries. Some libraries, however, are written completely in Lua, for example Corona’s widget library. Corona Labs has even made the original source code available. Whichever implementation the engineers chose for their code, the fact remains that in the “Lua world” each function is tied to the rules of Lua. In fact, every library — including the string library — is actually a Lua table. That’s right: string is a table and all of its functions are members of that table. As a result of this, we can do some clever things quite easily! A Useful Custom Function The first thing we’ll learn is how to add our own functions to Corona’s own API libraries. Why would we want to do that? Well, let’s say you’ve written a really useful function which removes the leading and trailing spaces from a string. In most languages, this is called trim(). local function trim( str ) return ( str:gsub("^%s*(.-)%s*$", "%1") ) end Don’t worry about what’s actually happening inside the function. Just know that you’ve written it, it’s awesome, and it works really well on strings that have annoying and unnecessary spaces at the start and/or end. print( trim( " Hello World! " ) ) --Outputs: Hello World! A common practice for Corona developers is to put this trim() function into a custom Lua module such as utils.lua. This is fine, but we can easily make it more memorable and categorically accurate — after all, this function is a “string” function, so why not access it like the built-in string functions? Adding to Corona’s APIs To be clear, if our custom trim() function is in a file called utils.lua, we want all the work done in that file. To facilitate this, utils.lua must be loaded into memory using a standard require() call: require("utils") And the function in the utils.lua may look like this: local function trim( str ) return ( str:gsub("^%s*(.-)%s*$", "%1") ) end Now let’s add this function to the Corona string library. In utils.lua, after we define our function, we follow it with a standard table value assignment (this is the magic bit): string.trim = trim That’s it! You can now call the function from anywhere in your code. string.trim(" Hello World! ") --Outputs: Hello World! The Beauty of Libraries Let’s say we have a string defined: local str = " Hello World! " What’s great about having the trim() function in the string library is that we can now call the function as a member of any string variable: print( str:trim() ) --Output
214 3 months ago
Featured iPhone Development Resources I’ve mentioned a few libraries allowing you create UITableView cells with swipe to reveal buttons in the iOS 7 Mail application, most recently MSCMoreOptionTableViewCell and RMSWipeTableVIewCe...
Featured iPhone Development Resources I’ve mentioned a few libraries allowing you create UITableView cells with swipe to reveal buttons in the iOS 7 Mail application, most recently MSCMoreOptionTableViewCell and RMSWipeTableVIewCell. Here’s a library called SWTableViewCell from Christopher Wendel that allows you to take the swipe to reveal buttons concept a step further than the previously mentioned libraries with some easy options for customization. With SWTableViewCell you can easily create custom buttons that are revealed with both left or white swipes with custom colorization, and custom icons, and custom titles. Here’s an animation from the readme showing SWTableViewCell in action: You can find SWTableViewCell on Github here. A nice library for implementing swipe to reveal UITableViewCell buttons. Be the first to comment... Related Posts:Open Source Control For Easy Customizable Gesture Controlled Table View CellsOpen Source Control For Easily Creating Swipe Gesture Responsive Animated UITableView CellsOpen Source iOS UITableViewCell Library Adds A More Button To Your Table View CellsOpen Source: UITableView Replacement With Swipeable CellsOpen Source: Custom UITableViewCell Implementation For Easy Swipeable TableView Cells Original article: Library For Easily Creating UITableView Cells With Customizable Swipe-To-Reveal Buttons©2013 iOS App Dev Libraries, Controls, Tutorials, Examples and Tools. All Rights Reserved.
1 day ago
@jakemgold @johnallsopp Here is Moto X for $299 off contract
@jakemgold @johnallsopp Here is Moto X for $299 off contract
1 day ago