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would you like a slice? It was pretty, it was good, it was gone by the end of the day I baked it. someone did get a slice In this crostata, I celebrate the change of seasons: the filling incl...
would you like a slice? It was pretty, it was good, it was gone by the end of the day I baked it. someone did get a slice In this crostata, I celebrate the change of seasons: the filling includes plum preserves I made in early summer and apples from the new crop. The recipe is attached to the current edition of my column on The Weiser Kitchen. This is my contribution to edition #100 of Black and White Wednesday - A Culinary Photography Event created by Susan of The Well-Seasoned Cook, now organized by Cinzia of Cindystar, and hosted this week by Cinzia herself. The photos were shot in color and then converted to black and white (Lightroom preset B&W Look 1). On this page, you can find out who is hosting the current and future editions of the event.
about 5 hours ago
Yes, that's whipped cream on those cupcakes - that is not frosting. And that whipped cream will look just as nice the next day and the day after that. How? Because it's stabilized whipped cream and if you've ever wondered how profession...
Yes, that's whipped cream on those cupcakes - that is not frosting. And that whipped cream will look just as nice the next day and the day after that. How? Because it's stabilized whipped cream and if you've ever wondered how professional bakers get whipped cream desserts to look nice for so long, you will want to read this post.There are several methods to stabilize whipped cream. The method I'm showing you here uses a little bit of gelatin that has been bloomed by warming it up. It's a very simple way to do it and, unlike some other methods, doesn't alter the taste of the whipped cream.The whipped cream really firms up and you can actually pipe it and it won't sag or weep. I used my trusty Wilton 1M piping tip to do the roses on top of the cupcakes. Sometimes you want to put whipped cream on desserts ahead of time and still have them look nice by the time you serve them. This technique does the trick. Stabilized Whipped Creamfor a printed recipe click hereIngredients:1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin4 teaspoons cold water1 cup heavy whipping cream1/4 cup confectioner's sugarInstructions:In a small pan, combine gelatin and cold water; let stand until thick.Place over low heat, stirring constantly, just until the gelatin dissolves.Remove from heat; cool (do not allow it to set).Whip the cream with the confectioner's sugar, until slightly thick.While slowly beating, add the gelatin to whipping cream.Whip at high speed until stiff.Makes about 2 cups of whipped cream.recipe from Wilton
about 13 hours ago
While my reading time has been quite limited since the summer, I’ve had the pleasure of dipping into a wonderful story every moment I could with Linda Katmarian’s debut novel Dreaming of Laughing Hawk. With deep and fascinati...
While my reading time has been quite limited since the summer, I’ve had the pleasure of dipping into a wonderful story every moment I could with Linda Katmarian’s debut novel Dreaming of Laughing Hawk. With deep and fascinating characters and a storyline that drew me into the novel more and more with each page, this was a thoroughly enjoyable read. On a cold spring day in 1964, with the hope of escaping home and studying art at university filling her heart and head, Elizabeth Leigh skips out of high school early. In a matter of moments everything in her unsettled life changes. Her mother’s packed suitcase, broken promises, more lies, dreams shattered – and no one to tell her why. With nothing keeping her in the place that wasn’t really ever home, Elizabeth accepts a fortuitous invitation from her cousin to spend the summer in sunny California. Life couldn’t possibly be more different at her aunt Caroline’s house, where Lizzy, as her family insists on calling her, settles into a beautiful home and comfortable lifestyle where she meets new people, led along by her gorgeous and bubbly cousin Melina. While Melina is more concerned about summer fun, Elizabeth works to save money for university. Through family connections she starts a job as secretary for Collin Greenslade, a handsome and ambitious young man eager to get out from the overbearing grasp of his father’s business. The most unlikely of matches, Elizabeth and Collin both have a hole deep inside–a need to be loved–that draws them together. Collin offers Elizabeth everything she could dream of, love, comfort, beautiful things, and she falls for what is too tempting to resist – security. But, there’s just one problem. Mark Laughing Hawk. A Native American from South Dakota and studying medicine at UCLA, Hawk is the roommate of Melina’s boyfriend Jake. When Jake gets in trouble with his civil rights activism in Mississippi, he calls in the help of Hawk to come and rescue him and tow his ruined car back home. Never one to miss out on a little fun, Melina concocts a story that allows her and Elizabeth to go with Hawk to Mississippi. This is no average road trip. It’s an adventure that sets in motion unstoppable events in the life of Elizabeth and Hawk. There are choices to be made by the characters in the story, and they are certainly ones that resonated with me. Do you risk everything to follow where your heart leads you or do you hold on with all your might to the one thing you always thought you wanted? There’s a point in the novel where Mark Laughing Hawk says, “Your destiny is determined by the choices you make and the angels–or demons–you invite to accompany you.” As Collin, Elizabeth and Hawk make their decisions–some followed by angels and others the darkest demons–the story unfolds into one of deep, beautiful and fierce love. ___________ Find out more about Linda Katmarian and Dreaming of Laughing Hawk by clicking here.
3 days ago
[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] It is an honor and a pleasure for me to host the October edition of Panissimo, the monthly bread-baking event that is the brainchild of Barbara of Bread & Companatico and Sandra ...
[cliccare il link per andare alla versione in italiano] It is an honor and a pleasure for me to host the October edition of Panissimo, the monthly bread-baking event that is the brainchild of Barbara of Bread & Companatico and Sandra of Indovina chi viene a cena? (Guess who's coming to dinner?). To participate: Write a post on a baked good of any type, provided it is based on yeast, commercial (fresh or instant yeast) or natural (sourdough or other ferment) or only in the case of flatbreads or other special unleavened breads, even without yeast. Link to the post at the bottom of this announcement. You can link to up to four posts published within the month of October. In your post, include a link to this announcement and also to the blogs of the event's creators: Bread & Companatico (Barbara) and Indovina chi viene a cena? (Sandra). Additional details are in this post. Breads with Special and Ancient FloursOptional: bake a bread using some special flour (like chestnut, chickpea, etc.) and/or some ancient flour (like kamut, einkorn, spelt, etc.) and/or some alternative flour (like sorghum, rice, etc.) and you will participate in the friendly competion attached to the event. Mulino Marino1, an Italian family-owned mill, has kindly agreed to offer a sample of their organic flours to reward two lucky bread bakers partecipating in the theme of “special and ancient flours” that will be ongoing until the end of October. (Again, this is optional.) Finally, Panissimo has a twin Polish group, thanks to the collaboration with Wisla and her bread showcase (I recommend you stop by and send your bread(s) there too). I will publish a roundup of the contributions in early November. If you have any question, you can contact me ( simosite AT mac DOT com ) or the event's organizers ( panissimoblog AT gmail DOT com ). If you encounter problems while adding your link to the list, leave me a comment on this post or write to me ( simosite AT mac DOT com ). È un onore e un piacere per me ospitare l'edizione di Ottobre di Panissimo, evento mensile di panificazione creato da Barbara di Bread & Companatico e Sandra di Indovina chi viene a cena?. Per participare: Scrivete un post su un prodotto da forno di qualsiasi tipo a condizione che sia fatto com del lievito commerciale (lievito di birra fresco o secco) o naturale (pasta madre o altro tipo di fermento) oppure, ma solo in caso di pani azzimi, senza lievito. Aggiungete il link del post alla lista che trovate in fondo a questo annuncio. Potete aggiungere fino a quattro post, tutti pubblicati nel mese di Ottobre. Il post deve includere un link a questo annuncio e anche ai blog delle creatrici dell'evento: Bread & Companatico (Barbara) e Indovina chi viene a cena? (Sandra). Ulteriori dettagli potete trovarli in questo post. Farine speciali e anticheFacoltativo: preparate un prodotto da forno utilizzando delle farine speciali (come castagne, ceci, ecc.) e/o delle farine antiche (come spelt, kamut, enkir, ecc.) e/o delle farine alternative (come sorgo, riso, ecc.)per partecipare alla competizione amichevole connessa all'evento. L'azienda Mulino Marino, un mulino a conduzione familiare piemontese, generosamente offre delle farine bio di sua produzione come premio per due fortunati partecipanti al tema "farine speciali e antiche" che continua fino alla fine di Ottobre. (Ripeto, questa parte è facoltativa.) Infine, Panissimo è gemellato con un event polacco grazie alla collaborazione con Wisla e la sua vetrina di pani. Fatele una visita e, se volete, mandatele il vostro post. Pubblichero il riepilogo dell'evento all'inizio di Novembre. Per qualsiasi informazione potete scrivere a me ( simosite AT mac DOT com ) oppure alle organizzatrici dell'evento ( panissimoblog AT gmail DOT com ). Se incontrate problemi nell'aggiungere il vostro link alla lista, lasciatemi un commento a questo post oppure scrivetemi ( simosite AT mac DOT com ). 1 FTC disclosure: I do no
7 days ago
Chicken Involtini or Involtini Di Pollo (Stuffed Chicken Breasts) finished and ready to be consumed with a glass of white wine and farro Involtini Di Pollo or Chicken Involtini (Stuffed Chicken Breasts) is a fabulous way to manipulate ch...
Chicken Involtini or Involtini Di Pollo (Stuffed Chicken Breasts) finished and ready to be consumed with a glass of white wine and farro Involtini Di Pollo or Chicken Involtini (Stuffed Chicken Breasts) is a fabulous way to manipulate chicken breast to get the most out of a usually bland cut of chicken.  Our Involtini Di Pollo recipe features a stuffing with spinach, mushrooms, and mozzarella.    We also flour our involtini prior to pan frying and then slowly simmer the stuffed chicken breasts in chicken stock and white wine. Chicken Involtini or Involtini Di Pollo (Stuffed Chicken Breasts) sliced to reveal stuffing made with spinach, mozzarella, and mushrooms. Chicken Involtini or Involtini Di Pollo (Stuffed Chicken Breasts) Print Prep time 30 mins Cook time 30 mins Total time 1 hour Chicken Involtini or Involtini Di Pollo (Stuffed Chicken Breasts translated literally) Cook: Vincent Scordo – Scordo.com Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 3 large chicken breasts 1 bunch of fresh spinach, sauted in olive oil and garlic ahead of time (and/or 1 block of frozen spinach) 1 cup of whole milk mozzarella, diced into cubes 2 cups of shitake mushrooms, finely diced and sauteed with olive oil and garlic ahead of time (and seasoned with salt and pepper) ¼ cup chicken stock Extra virgin olive oil for searing chicken ¼ cup white wine ½ cup of flour Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper Finely chopped parsley Process Slice each chicken breast the long way, ending up with 9 thin pieces. Pound each slice with a mallet and set aside (note: using plastic wrap will help keep your cutting board clean) Mix the mushrooms, mozzarella, and spinach in a seperate bowl and add a bit of mixture over the top of each chicken slice. Roll each of the chicken pieces and pierce with a toothpick. Heat a large fry pan and add olive oil. Season each involtini with black pepper and salt and dredge the pieces in flour (making sure to remove excess flour). Sear each piece of chicken until golden brown and remove to a seperate dish. Deglaze pan with wine and chicken stock; add the chicken back to the pan and set flame to low. Simmer chicken for 10-20 minutes depending on the size of the chicken breast slices. Remove chicken from pan and add parsley and reduce sauce (depending on how loose or thick you like your sauce). 3.2.1226   Chicken Involtini or Involtini Di Pollo (Stuffed Chicken Breasts) is an article from - The Italian Life for Everyone
8 days ago
at time zero I share photographs because of what they mean to me. I treasure most of my photographs because I think they are beautiful, a few others because, though far from perfect, capture a moment of simple ...
at time zero I share photographs because of what they mean to me. I treasure most of my photographs because I think they are beautiful, a few others because, though far from perfect, capture a moment of simple joy, like drinking a caffè macchiato while doing my writing practice. ten minutes later I usually write with a fountain pen, but when I travel by plane I don't carry that beloved writing instrument with me, because the change of pressure pushes some ink out of the cartridge and the result is rather messy. The photos above were taken while I was away from home, so the writing you see was done with a regular ballpoint pen. (I also have an injured right thumb, so my handwriting is really bad these days.) This is my contribution to edition #99 of Black and White Wednesday - A Culinary Photography Event created by Susan of The Well-Seasoned Cook, now organized by Cinzia of Cindystar, and hosted this week by Priya of The Humpty Dumpty Kitchen. The photos were shot in color and then converted to sepia (Lightroom preset Sepia Tone). On this page, you can find out who is hosting the current and future editions of the event.
8 days ago
Participating in an Italian harvest, whether it's grapes or olives, is an uplifting experience. Italy’s Autumnal harvest season is one big celebration, beginning in mid-September with the picking of white wine grapes, booming in October...
Participating in an Italian harvest, whether it's grapes or olives, is an uplifting experience. Italy’s Autumnal harvest season is one big celebration, beginning in mid-September with the picking of white wine grapes, booming in October with the harvest of the red varieties, and peaking in November, that magical month of olive picking and oil production. Harvests are entertaining because
8 days ago
Marcella Hazan passed away yesterday. She was my Julia Child. I never really liked Italian food, until I discovered Larry Mindel's restaurant Ciao in San Francisco. It was like stepping into Italy. There is no way to really co...
Marcella Hazan passed away yesterday. She was my Julia Child. I never really liked Italian food, until I discovered Larry Mindel's restaurant Ciao in San Francisco. It was like stepping into Italy. There is no way to really cook Italian style without having come to Italy. Marcella was my first Italian teacher, through her cookbooks. Marcella's rough and tough way of preserving the true recipes, always came off strong. When I moved to Italy, I got it. She was our Italian mamma, no messing around. Her backround in biology made her recipes precise. If she said something, she meant it. I loved her book, Marcella Says, the title says it all! I was lucky to work at the Stanford Court Hotel in San Francisco for 7 years and the owner Jim Nassikas was one of the first to offer cooking classes with famous chefs. The hotel hosted Julia Child, James Beard and Marcella Hazan and Marian Cunningham. They were all an inspiration to me. When I moved to Italy, I decided I wanted to offer cooking classes for those that could not take a full week with Marcella, Lorenza dei Medici or Fulvia Sesani, the Queens of the Italian cooking schools. Thirty years later, I am now ready to offer full week programs. Mille Grazie Marcella--- When I am in the kitchen, you are always over my shoulder! From a FB note from Marcella: "There is indeed something about the romagnoli. They have a short fuse, they are combative, irascible, passionate, and of course with authoritarian tendencies. It's no accident that Mussolini and Fascism came from Romagna, but the maledetti toscani took it and ran with it. But we, unlike some Tuscans and some American writers, are not mean-spirited, and while I may sometimes speak with a sharp tongue, I don't believe I have ever been mean to or spread mean gossip about anyone. I have spent my entire teaching and writing career focusing on simplicity and careful cooking. You can't achieve the former without practicing the latter. The focus of many of my students, however, was on eliminating any effort - why do we have to stir the risotto, why can't we trim artichokes with a scissor, why do we have to sauté all the vegetables for a minestrone separately - and at the same time on coming up with something "creative". How I loathe that word.You are, no doubt, a sweeter-tempered woman, my dear Judy, and I envy you for it. Ma non aver paura di me se abbaio. Non mordo." ( don't be afraid of me if i bark. I don't bite)
9 days ago
please have one, or two Biscotto is a word of Latin origin that means twice-baked: the dough is baked, cut into slices and baked again. (To be precise, cooked means cotto, but in Italian we don't have a specifi...
please have one, or two Biscotto is a word of Latin origin that means twice-baked: the dough is baked, cut into slices and baked again. (To be precise, cooked means cotto, but in Italian we don't have a specific verb for cooking in the oven; "to bake" is cuocere al forno, literally: to cook in the oven.)  From describing a cooking procedure, the word biscotto came to indicate a baked product, crunchy and fairly dry in texture (see a photo in this post). Nowadays, biscotti are not necessarily twice-baked (though some of them are, like biscotti di Prato). In Italy, you can find shelves full of biscotti in grocery stores: we call them frollini, novelllini, petit, oswego (or osvego), etc. When I moved to California, I did not find in the local stores any of the biscotti I was used to eating. On the other hand, I found plenty of 'biscotti,' that is, variations on the theme of a twice-baked product that up until then I had called cantucci. preparing almonds and chocolate I shared my recipe for the lovely treat in my previous post on biscotti. However, I kept experimenting with variations and I think that the most recent version warrants sharing. The most recent change to the recipe was inspired by the current Cook the Books Club selection: The Baker's Daughter by Sarah McCoy. One of the stories narrated in parallel in the novel is set in Garmisch, a mountain resort in Bavaria, during the last year of World War II. The other story is set in El Paso, Texas, a few years ago. The link between the two locations and stories is Elsie, the title character.  On this page, you can find a short description of the novel and an evocative video that brought a smile to my face, because, honestly, does not describe the way I read the novel. Writers know that when they send their words out into the world, the way the world reads them is outside their control. The novel and events that occurred while I was reading it, made me think a lot about evil and what I do (and can do in addition) in my small sliver of world to counter its effects. At the beginning of a manifestation of evil, there is the judgment of another person to be "less" or inferior, because of his or her gender, race, physical characteristics, religious or political belief, sexual orientation, etc. Then, each step justified by the previous one, the judgment becomes oppression, persecution, and finally physical elimination. This happens every day around us, so every day, I need to look for signs of it and for ways in which I can do my part to stop it. I will return to this topic soon, since the book I read after The Baker's Daughter made me continue my reflection on evil. In the novel, the baker of the title prepares cookies called Lebkuchen as a special treat for Christmas, one for each member of the family, near or far, alive or dead. There is a recipe for Lebkuchen Hearts at the end of the book, but it is way too sweet for our household's taste. As I could not let go of the idea of baking a lightly spiced treat, I thought of adding a bit of Lebkuchengewürz to my biscotti. The Lebkuchengewürz is a ground mix where the prevailing spice, in terms of quantity, is cannella (cinnamon). The one I used contains also chiodi di garofano (cloves), coriandolo (coriander), cardamomo (cardamom), and anice (anise). (In the past, I used Lebkuchengewürz to make Lebkuchen Loaf Cake.) Other differences between the new version of biscotti and the "old" one are the use of flaxseed meal and water as substitute for one of the eggs, and the substitution of some of the whole-wheat pastry flour with whole-grain millet (miglio) and sorghum (sorgo), which are both gluten-free. dough in progress Print-friendly version of briciole's recipe for biscotti Ingredien
9 days ago
This summer I released my Chianti:Food+Wine APP, starting with the area on the 222 wine road. My dream is to expand to the other regions of Chianti as well. My mother-in-law was from Figline Val D'Arno, so it seemed like a natural fir...
This summer I released my Chianti:Food+Wine APP, starting with the area on the 222 wine road. My dream is to expand to the other regions of Chianti as well. My mother-in-law was from Figline Val D'Arno, so it seemed like a natural first addition. Through FB I met Eric, the GM of the Palagina hotel in the hills above Figline. It was the home of Barone Ricasoli, who created Chianti, what better place to start. Meal with a view! It is just down the hill from Sting's home, Il Palagio ( you can go and buy the wine at the shop) Eric introduced me to his chef, and he shared his recipe for Pappa al Pomodoro, using fresh tomatoes, a real treat in summer. It is an all year recipe though as it is great made with good Italian canned tomatoes too. Simple ingredients. Just made a small batch for the two of us. Rich, vine-ripened tomatoes. Yellow onion. Garlic and basil. And Tuscan stale bread. Pappa al pomodoro is a soup for all seasons. The recipe on my website was from my friend Sauro, who was a chef in Fiesole. Tons of garlic, a leek base and I always add some chili for a kick. Federico's recipe from Palagina, is really fresh and rich using just the yellow onion and fresh tomatoes. Thanks for sharing your recipe! If you are not planning on staying at Il Palagina, I do recommend enjoying a meal there or a cocktail and pick up some of their fabulous olive oil! Fresh Pappa al Pomodoro alla Palagina Saute one yellow onion, chopped, in extra virgin olive oil until tender. Add sliced garlic, chopped tomatoes and basil. Salt to taste. Let cook until the tomatoes have fallen apart. Add the stale Tuscan bread ( it is unsalted, so goes stale quickly. In USA unseasoned stuffing mix works.) Stir and the bread will absorb the tomato, add some water to make it more soupy. Taste again for salt. Serve room temperature. Villa il Palagina Figline Val D'Arno Just off the A1 highway, 28 minutes by train to Florence. Near the outlets! My Chianti: Food+Wine app is also now available for Adroids and iPhone or iPad will be adding new updates soon- all updates are FREE
12 days ago