Jazz

add news feed

tweet a story

Normal 0 false false false st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-nos...
Normal 0 false false false st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} © Andrea Canter For nearly four decades, over three locations and one significant hiatus, the Artists Quarter has symbolized the true spirit of jazz --a collaborative, forward-thinking, open community. And like most jazz clubs throughout the country, the AQ has struggled to hold faithful audience in the face of rising costs, declining support to the arts, and dwindling audiences. We frequently read about club closings and have witnessed some significant ones here - the Times, Sophia's, Rossi's. In some cases, new venues pop up inside the walls of another, although each time that happens, it seems the music is more generic. Even venues famous as jazz outlets are more and more often presenting other music - the Dakota in Minneapolis has joined many other high profile clubs that seem to survive by drawing on more popular forms of music and thus drawing a wider audience. Owner Kenny Horst with Roy HaynesWhich leaves us the Artists Quarter as the only local, full-time presenter of jazz in a true club setting. Or the only such venue until the end of 2013 when owner Kenny Horst intends to close up shop in the face of ever-rising rent and never-rising revenue. The announcement was met with a torrent of protest and mourning, and most of the responses in the press and social media resembling the reactions to obituaries -- sadness of the passing, recognition of the departed's contributions. It's all past tense. It was a great club. We'll miss it. Will you miss the Artists Quarter? Will you miss the idea of the AQ (a haven for fans and musicians, an opportunity for new talent as well as veterans, a "preservation hall" of what jazz is and will become) or will you actually miss the music that rises from the Hamm Building basement six nights per week? Far more people are posting condolences than ever fill the club on a typical night. The Twin Cities is a peculiar arena for jazz. It's like a beacon for young musicians who recognize the uphill battle of gaining recognition in New York or LA. It's long been a jazz-friendly environment that spawned legends like Oscar Pettiford and 21st century mavericks like The Bad Plus; both the Dakota and AQ are typically on the lists of the world's "best jazz clubs," yet there are many more small venues that host jazz -- the Black Dog, Studio Z, Jazz Central, Icehouse, Cafe Maude, Hell's Kitchen. Given the size of the metro area, it seems we have a disproportionate number of jazz musicians and a relatively long list of venues that offer at least part-time possibilities for gigs. We sport one of the last jazz radio stations (KBEM) but also have other stations playing some jazz. And we host one of the largest jazz festivals in the Midwest. Dean MagrawSo there is plenty of jazz to go around. Who's listening? In between jazz festivals, where are those 25,000 "fans"? The Twin Cities remains a small market compared to the other major jazz meccas -- New York, Chicago, Boston, Los Angeles. But surely there are enough true jazz fans out there to at least half-fill the Artists Quarter on weeknights when the likes of Dave Karr, Phil Hey, Dean Magraw, and Pete Whitman are on stage? Let's not turn the Artists Quarter's plight into another case of regret that we did not appreciate Aunt Ethel until she was gone, or spend time with Uncle Harry until we learned he was terminally ill. It might be too little too late to raise funds to keep the AQ doors open, maybe not -- it's a discussion that needs
about 6 hours ago
Though Cardinal baseball may be preoccupying large segments of the populace in St. Louis, the fall jazz and creative music presenting season nevertheless continues this week with a full slate of performances in a wide variety of styles.M...
Though Cardinal baseball may be preoccupying large segments of the populace in St. Louis, the fall jazz and creative music presenting season nevertheless continues this week with a full slate of performances in a wide variety of styles.Music fans who care to venture forth into clubs and concert halls over the next few days will find everything from traditional New Orleans jazz to bluesy, bop-inflected saxophone from an old-school jazz master to top touring groups showcasing recombinant genres rooted in classical and bluegrass. Let's go to the highlights...Tonight, the veteran alto saxophonist Lou Donaldson will begin a four-night gig continuing through Saturday at Jazz at the Bistro. Performing with an organ trio, the 86-year-old Donaldson mixes blues, bop, ballads, and backbeats in a crowd-pleasing fashion, and usually adds additional entertainment with some wry, between-song quips along the way. For more about Donaldson (pictured) and some video samples of what you're likely to hear this weekend, see this post from last Saturday. Also tonight, the 20-member new music ensemble Alarm Will Sound begins their second St. Louis season at the Sheldon Concert Hall, previewing the program they'll play this weekend at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC. Elsewhere around town, the 442s play at the Tavern of Fine Arts; singer Joe Mancuso leads a trio at EdgeWild Restaurant and Winery in Chesterfield; and vibraphonist Peter Schlamb's group performs at BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups.Tomorrow night, the Jazz at Holmes series at Washington University presents a free concert featuring "Three Tenors of St. Louis," namely Freddie Washington, Willie Akins and Paul DeMarinis. While Washington and Akins have performed together occasionally in the past, the three-tenor format adds a new wrinkle and should make for some friendly but spirited competition. Also on Thursday, funk/R&B/jazz group Good 4 The Soul plays their monthly show at BB's.On Friday, mandolinist David Grisman, inventor of the acoustic swing/folk/rock/bluegrass hybrid style he calls "dawg music," brings his FolkJazz Trio to the Sheldon Concert Hall. Also on Friday, saxophonist Jay Hutson and Da Wolvez are at Robbie's House of Jazz; and pianist Ptah Williams leads a trio at Cigar Inn. On Saturday afternoon, guitarist Corey Christiansen will present a jazz improvisation workshop at Mozingo Music. Christensen, who lived in St. Louis for several years before moving back to Utah in 2007, also will lead a trio in a Saturday night performance at Robbie's. Elsewhere on Saturday night, the Bosman Twins and friends from several different locales are teaming up for one of their periodic "Reunion Jazz Band' gigs at BB's Jazz, Blues and Soups; and Sarah Jane and the Blue Notes trio perform at Thurman Grill.On Sunday, the St. Louis Jazz Club presents the St. Louis Stompers at the Doubletree Hotel in Westport, and the free "Inner Jazz" series of concerts at Kirkwood United Church of Christ continues this month with a trio led by bassist Bob DeBoo. Looking beyond the weekend, on Monday guitarist Robben Ford, who's played with jazz stars including Tom Scott, Jimmy Witherspoon and Miles Davis, will present a guitar clinic sponsored by Mozingo Music at Sky Music Lounge in Ballwin. Also on Monday, the Sessions Big Band plays at BB's Jazz, Blues & Soups.For more jazz-related events in and around St. Louis, please visit the St. Louis Jazz Notes Calendar, which can be found on the left sidebar of the site or by clicking here. You also can keep up with all the latest news by following St. Louis Jazz Notes on Twitter at http://twitter.com/StLJazzNotes or clicking the "Like" icon on the StLJN Facebook page.(If you have calendar items, band schedule information, news tips, links, or anything else you think may be of interest to StLJN's readers, please email the information to stljazznotes (at) yahoo (dot) com. If you have photos, MP3s or other digital files, please send links, not attachments.)
about 7 hours ago
October 9 $15 cover, $10 min 8PM-11PM Trumpets Jazz Club 6 Depot Square Montclair, NJ 07042 (973)744-2600 http://www.trumpetsjazz.com/main.html Tonight, Diane Moser's Composers Big Band will continue it's annual peace co...
October 9 $15 cover, $10 min 8PM-11PM Trumpets Jazz Club 6 Depot Square Montclair, NJ 07042 (973)744-2600 http://www.trumpetsjazz.com/main.html Tonight, Diane Moser's Composers Big Band will continue it's annual peace concert tradition with a tribute to legendary Jazz club owner ...
about 10 hours ago
mac, Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham UK 08-10-2013 Liam Noble plays far too rarely in the Midlands. It’s true at any time, but is particularly vehemently felt during and after a Liam Noble Midland gig. And this was a very special... R...
mac, Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham UK 08-10-2013 Liam Noble plays far too rarely in the Midlands. It’s true at any time, but is particularly vehemently felt during and after a Liam Noble Midland gig. And this was a very special... Read More ›
about 11 hours ago
The deadline for the sixth annual European Young Jazz Artists' Award Burghausen 2014 (in German Europäischer Burghauser Nachwuchs-Jazzpreis 2014) is approaching. The award is worth 10,000 Euros and is made by the Interessengemeinschaft J...
The deadline for the sixth annual European Young Jazz Artists' Award Burghausen 2014 (in German Europäischer Burghauser Nachwuchs-Jazzpreis 2014) is approaching. The award is worth 10,000 Euros and is made by the Interessengemeinschaft Jazz Burghausen e.V., in cooperation with the town of Burghausen.Burghausen is a pretty town in Bavaria, full of history, right on the Austrian border. It has the longest castle in Europe, and a whole "Street of Fame" dedicated to jazz (see image above). The organizers tell us they don't get many applicants from the UK, but one that did, Beats n Pieces Big Band, walked away with the prize in 2011, and it was a major boost for them to build their reputation back here. This prize, which is awarded annually, has been created "to actively promote pro­mising young jazz artists."Chair of jurors is Joe Viera, director of the Burghausen Jazz FestivalEntry is open to groups of three or more musicians up to big bands. Maximum age is 30.€ 10,000 is split into a € 5,000 cash prize and € 5,000 in promotions.THIS PAGE LINKS THROUGH TO THE APPLICATION FORMS
about 12 hours ago
By Steve Tromans “Man, if you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” - Louis Armstrong “Practice-as-research is a knowledge-political intervention.” - Susan Melrose [1] This second research article for thejazzbreakfast follows on ...
By Steve Tromans “Man, if you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” - Louis Armstrong “Practice-as-research is a knowledge-political intervention.” - Susan Melrose [1] This second research article for thejazzbreakfast follows on from the concerns of its predecessor (see... Read More ›
about 13 hours ago
The Impossible Gentlemen - Internationally Recognised Aliens (Basho SRCD 43-2. CD Review by Chris Parker) ‘... different spaces for improvisation rather than the usual theme and improvising sequence’ – this is the accompanying publicity...
The Impossible Gentlemen - Internationally Recognised Aliens (Basho SRCD 43-2. CD Review by Chris Parker) ‘... different spaces for improvisation rather than the usual theme and improvising sequence’ – this is the accompanying publicity’s take on the music written by pianist Gwilym Simcock and guitarist Mike Walker for this, the second album by the Impossible Gentlemen, completed by bassist Steve Swallow and drummer Adam Nussbaum.Much of the music on the band’s debut album had already been written before the quartet’s formation, but for this recording Walker and Simcock (and, on the closer, ‘Ever After’, Swallow) have tailored their compositions to fit the specific requirements of the group, which moves unaffectedly between tight, tastefully funky jazz-rock and more mellifluous, breezy jazz, the latter mode, on two Simcock tracks, ‘Just to See You’ and ‘Barber Blues’ accommodating the subtly driving acoustic bass of producer Steve Rodby.The surefooted Swallow and the deftly propulsive but powerful Nussbaum both have ‘a kind of natural compositional spontaneity which sculpts the music without any hint of trying to own it’ – to quote Walker on Nussbaum – so Walker’s declared ‘interest in blurring the lines between jazz, rock, pop and classical music ... [to create] a new, organic whole’ and Simcock’s more overtly jazz-rooted rolling lyricism (itself – as in the aforementioned 16-bar ‘Barber Blues’, which is inspired by one of the American composer’s ‘Excursions’ – tinged with classical influences) are both fully realised in this varied and absorbing programme.Walker (as can be heard in the album’s opener, ‘Heute Loiter’) is a stickler for identifying the precise guitar sound and texture he needs on each particular track, and is adept at slowly building climactic tension into his solos once he has found it, and Simcock is simply one of the most eloquent and natural-sounding improvisers in contemporary jazz, so their partnership at the helm of this inventive, unfussily virtuosic band has indeed produced an album packed with (to quote Rodby) ‘strong writing and playing – such vitality [expressing] their personalities in every soulful measure’.The band’s forthcoming 12-date UK tour, starting (10 October) in Dorking and ending (26) in Cardiff, is, on the evidence of this compulsively listenable album, a mouth-watering prospect. Theimpossiblegentlemen.com
about 13 hours ago
All About Jazz is celebrating Kenny Garrett's birthday today! Kenny Garrett is a jazz saxophonist. He was born in Detroit, MI in 1960. His father was a tenor saxophonist. Kenny\'s career took off when he joined the Duke Ellington Orch...
All About Jazz is celebrating Kenny Garrett's birthday today! Kenny Garrett is a jazz saxophonist. He was born in Detroit, MI in 1960. His father was a tenor saxophonist. Kenny\'s career took off when he joined the Duke Ellington Orchestra in 1978, then led by Duke\'s son, Mercer Ellington. Three years later he played in the Mel Lewis Orchestra (playing the music of Thad Jones) and also the Dannie Richmond Quartet (focusing on Charles Mingus\'s music). In 1984... Read more...
about 13 hours ago
Searching around YouTube yesterday, I found a gorgeous clip. The following video features vibraphonist m: Bobby Hutcherson with tenor saxophonist Harold Land on July 25, 1969 at the Juan Les Pins Jazz Festival in Antibes, France. They we...
Searching around YouTube yesterday, I found a gorgeous clip. The following video features vibraphonist m: Bobby Hutcherson with tenor saxophonist Harold Land on July 25, 1969 at the Juan Les Pins Jazz Festival in Antibes, France. They were backed by Stanley Cowell (p), Reggie Johnson (b) and Joe Chambers (d). This clip features the quintet on Herzog, which Hutcherson and Land recorded a year earlier on Hutcherson's album Total Eclipse (Blue Note). Dig the heat of Land against the coolness of Hutcherson, not to mention the virtuosity of the rhythm section (only drag is the final seconds of the song are nipped off)...
about 15 hours ago
The saxophone is the most iconic of jazz instruments. Its image is all that is needed to invoke the music's essence, its history intimately entangled with the cultural arc of American music and urban culture. Its masters are the most rec...
The saxophone is the most iconic of jazz instruments. Its image is all that is needed to invoke the music's essence, its history intimately entangled with the cultural arc of American music and urban culture. Its masters are the most recognized outside jazz circles and its sound most closely identif...
about 16 hours ago