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Here's a look at what a team made up of the best players judged by fWAR over the last three seasons might look like. For all the spots except the bench, it's a strictly objective measure of who has the highest fWAR by a player with signi...
Here's a look at what a team made up of the best players judged by fWAR over the last three seasons might look like. For all the spots except the bench, it's a strictly objective measure of who has the highest fWAR by a player with significant time at each position. I have to use a little subjectivity to put together a sensible bench. The second best catcher by fWAR is obvious, McCutchen as the fourth outfielder is obvious, but then I tried to round it out with super-utility man Zobrist, the second best shortstop in Reyes, and a big bat who can also play the field in Beltre. This leaves off some guys with higher fWAR (most notably Dustin Pedroia and his 17.4 fWAR) just because they don't fit into what I view as the most typical bench construction.Of course Mike Trout and Miguel Cabrera are tied in fWAR over the last three seasons. Trout barely played in 2011 though, so...yeah.There is surprisingly little change from the 2010-12 team. Among the position players, Trout is the only new name. He took Josh Hamilton's spot. In the starting rotation, Clayton Kershaw replacing Roy Halladay was the only change. There's a little more turnover in the bullpen: Greg Holland, Koji Uehara, Kenley Jansen, and Aroldis Chapman are in, while Sean Marshall, Matt Belisle, Matt Thornton, and Rafael Betancourt are out.
about 4 hours ago
A recent civil suit likely brought on increased criminal scrutiny.
A recent civil suit likely brought on increased criminal scrutiny.
about 4 hours ago
Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports Many people need their coffee to get up and going in the morning, and especially in the middle of the afternoon when things are starting to drag.  Here at Arrowhead Addict, we understand that for a Chiefs fa...
Denny Medley-USA TODAY Sports Many people need their coffee to get up and going in the morning, and especially in the middle of the afternoon when things are starting to drag.  Here at Arrowhead Addict, we understand that for a Chiefs fan, coffee is simply not enough. Here’s all that’s happening around Chiefs Kingdom today. Welcome to The Arrowhead Fix. –Let’s talk about special teams, and specifically, kickers. In many NFL cities special teams is an overlooked part of the game, but not in Kansas City. Dave Toub has the Chiefs’ special teams firing on all cylinders and kicker Ryan Succop is a huge part of that. In fact, I considered him to be the Chiefs most important player against Tennessee last weekend. Succop talked about last Sunday’s win, per Reid Ferrin of KCChiefs.com: “It was awesome,” Succop said of Sunday’s win. “I’m really proud of Dustin (Colquitt) and Thomas (Gafford). I was really pumped that Dustin was able to come out and hold for me. People don’t realize how big of a deal that is, and he toughed it out. Obviously, he was a little banged up and he came out and held and did a great job and fortunately we were able to go out there and make some big kicks today and go out there and put the game away there in the end and praise God.” –There is a group of Kansas City fans who are aiming to have Arrowhead Stadium set the Guinness World Record of 136.6 decibels in regard to stadium noise this Sunday against the Raiders. Rachel Santschi of KCChiefs.com has more in a feature on the movement. –There has been a lot of talk about Tony Gonzalez possibly coming back to the Chiefs via a trade. After all, things are looking bleak in Atlanta and the Chiefs have had injury problems at tight end. Brandon Flowers thoughts on that are as follows, via Terez A. Paylor of The Kansas City Star. “That would be all the way up to Tony Gonzalez if he wants to come back to Kansas City,” said Flowers, who was Gonzalez’s teammate in 2008. “I’d love to have him back here. That’s one of the guys, he was definitely a pro. He definitely taught me how to be a pro in this locker room. He’s just a great guy to have on your team. You can ask anybody that ever played with him. So I would welcome him back with open arms.” For the record, tight end Travis Kelce may be out for the season. Also for the record, according to Ian Rapoport of NFL.com, Atlanta is not interested in a trade at the moment. Brandon Flowers on Tony Gonzalez: “I’d love to have him back here” - Arrowhead Addict - Arrowhead Addict - A Kansas City Chiefs Fan Site - News, Blogs, Opinion and more
about 4 hours ago
Those crazy kids.
Those crazy kids.
about 4 hours ago
The offseason is here and while the Hot Stove is still officially a few weeks away from firing up, we know Dayton Moore likes to move quickly. Let us refer to this article to examine Dayton's offseason plans. “We’re g...
The offseason is here and while the Hot Stove is still officially a few weeks away from firing up, we know Dayton Moore likes to move quickly. Let us refer to this article to examine Dayton's offseason plans. “We’re going to look internally first. Then we’re going to look for trades, and then we’ll focus on the free-agent market. We’re not an organization that is going to be excited to go real long term with older players.” My sense is that trades will be how Dayton will want to operate this winter. The club will not have a ton of room to operate financially unless David Glass significantly increases payroll. I get the sense that Dayton is shying away from free agency overall after being burned by Jose Guillen and to a lesser extent, Gil Meche. Plus free agents won't sign here unless we overpay! Keep repeating this until its true! So what kind of trades could Dayton pursue?The likeliest course, if Santana and/or Chen depart, would be to seek another trade for a bounce-back candidate, preferably one entering a contract year to avoid a long-term commitment. Jeff Zimmerman did a good job looking at our rotation prospects for next year. Dayton will probably want to add one more veteran pitcher in the middle of that rotation to keep the pitching from regressing too much. Let's take a look at some pitchers that could be traded as "bounce-back candidates" with a year or two left of control. Later, I wll take a look at second basemen and outfielders. LHP Brett Anderson, Oakland Athletics Anderson has an $8 million option Oakland will certainly decline, leaving him arbitration-eligible. The 25-year old Anderson has talent - he was the 7th best prospect in 2009, and has a 3.81 ERA in 84 Major League games pitched. But he has made just 43 starts the last four seasons, and was dreadful in 2013 with a 6.02 ERA in 16 games (5 starts). Anderson is a Tommy John surgery surivor, although that was back in 2011. His injuries this year were on his ankle. Anderson could be a decent buy-low candidate if the A's are willing to part with some of their depth. Anderson is not eligible for free agency until after 2015.RHP Chad Billingsley, Los Angeles Dodgers Billingsley has been discussed here before as he has been a very effective pitcher for the Dodgers. He has generally been between a 1.5 to 3.5 WAR pitcher when healthy, and is still under 30 years old. Billingsley is owed $12 million in 2014 with a $14 million club option and a $3 million buyout. However, he pitched just 12 innings this year before going under the knife for Tommy John surgery. He has targeted Opening Day 2014 as his return date. To make a trade happen, the Dodgers would almost certainly have to eat most of the money owed to Billingsley.RHP Tommy Hanson, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim The Angels seemingly got a steal of a deal when they acquired Hanson from the Braves for reliever Jordan Walden last winter. Sure, Hanson was coming off a 4.48 ERA season, but he had struck out 8 hitters per nine innings, and had three solid Major League seasons under his belt prior to that.Hanson turned out to be a disaster, posting a 5.42 ERA in thirteen starts, and missing time due to an injured tricep and ineffectiveness. Hanson has long battled injuries throughout his career, but has a ton of strikeouts. He may be a non-tender candidate, but as an ex-Brave, he might still be enticing enough to take a gamble on as a buy-low candidate.LHP J.A. Happ, Toronto Blue Jays Happ was a 4.2 WAR pitcher for the Phillies way back in 2009 before being dealt to Houston in the Roy Oswalt deal. He was pretty good in limited action in 2010 before being dreadful in 2011. He spent 2013 with the Blue Jays, putting up a 4.53 ERA in eighteen starts. He missed some time after being struck in the head with a line drive in May. Happ can still strike hitters out - he struck out a hitter per inning in 2012. His problem has been command. He has 4.0 walks per nine innings
about 4 hours ago
Travis Kelce, who has yet to play any offensive snaps this season, had knee surgery on Tuesday afternoon, according to Chiefs trainer Rick Burkholder. Andy Reid and GM John Dorsey have not yet decided what they will do with him but endin...
Travis Kelce, who has yet to play any offensive snaps this season, had knee surgery on Tuesday afternoon, according to Chiefs trainer Rick Burkholder. Andy Reid and GM John Dorsey have not yet decided what they will do with him but ending his season early is a possibility. In fact, I would guess that's what they're going to do at some point. Burkholder laid out the timeline of events for us at today's practice. Kelce's knee injury first popped up in training camp. He had an MRI and they determined it was a bone bruise in his knee. But whenever Kelce tried to make a come back to the field, he kept having setbacks. More MRIs were done and they continued to show the bone bruise. He was fine running when attempting to rehab, but he couldn't get in and out of his stance when he put weight on his knee. "Yesterday," Burkholder told the media on Wednesday, "[Kelce] had arthroscopic surgery on his knee. He did find he had a spot on his cartilage at the end of his femur bone. That didn't know up on his MRI but when [the doctor] went in with the scope he could see it. That spot in his knee is in a non-weight bearing area, which is why he could run without pain but couldn't get in and out of his stance, had to have a micro-fracture procedure." Is this a season-ending injury? "Anytime you have knee surgery there's that chance," Burkholder said. Reid didn't say whether the Chiefs would IR him or not -- they're going to take their time -- but the impression I got is that that's a strong likelihood. Is this the type of injury that can threaten his career? "This is an injury that people get better from," Burkholder continued. "He's a young guy and has a healthy knee." So I wouldn't count on Kelce for the rest of this season. The rest of the injury report: Donnie Avery: He has a shoulder contusion and could practice today, according to Reid. Jamaal Charles: He still has blisters on his toes, which are apparently really bad. "They're a mess." He won't practice today but there was every indication that he would be available for Sunday's game. Anthony Fasano: He won't practice with a knee strain. Eric Fisher: He returns today from a concussion. Justin Houston: "He took a hit to the neck area [last week against the Titans] and we'll just see how he does," Reid said. "But he feels great right now. There aren't necessarily symptoms, we just want to make sure we take care of business." Update from today's practice: #Chiefs who did not practice: Charles, Fasano, Houston, Lewis, Kelce. Zombo was in Houston's spot at OLB — Adam Teicher (@adamteicher) October 9, 2013 More from Arrowhead Pride: Stopping the Oakland Raiders Records, stats and notes for the Week 6 game Arrowheadlines: Chiefs News 10/9 Chiefs worked out 5 free agents this week, including 2 QBs Tony Gonzalez shoots down those trade rumors
about 4 hours ago
Who is Andy Reid? Andeeey Reeeeid. Andy. Reeeeid. Hmmm. Didn't he manage Roy Hobbs to the World Series, in the Natural? I think he did. I think I even remember Andy wishing he was a farmer: Andy Reid: You know my mama wanted me t...
Who is Andy Reid? Andeeey Reeeeid. Andy. Reeeeid. Hmmm. Didn't he manage Roy Hobbs to the World Series, in the Natural? I think he did. I think I even remember Andy wishing he was a farmer: Andy Reid: You know my mama wanted me to be a farmer. Roy Hobbs: My dad wanted me to be a baseball player. Andy Reid: Well you're better than any player I ever had. And you're the best God damn hitter I ever saw. via Pic Source Why the heck would you get a baseball guy, who secretly wants to be a farmer, to coach the Kansas City Chiefs? No? That's not him? Okay, Andy Reid, Andy Reid....is he the head coach of the Philadelphia Eagles from 1999-2012. During that tenure, led the Eagles to 5 NFC Championship games and 1 Super Bowl. But they had a lot of talent, didn't they? Anybody could have coached those guys. At least that is what my buddy from Philly said. You can't just come in here, with a floundering team, and make this team look like it belongs in the NFL....and have the players like coming to work, to boot. Can you? Andy Reid Appears To Like A Good Defense From 1999-2012, Andy Reid's Eagles ranked in the top ten in points allowed, 8 times. That is music to this fan's ears. Oh, take me back to Neil Smith and the boys...please! We have to give some kudos to prior coaches and general managers, however. Even Andy Reid would probably tell you that part of his success is his unique position,standing on the pile of coaching bodies that have been drown by this franchise's floundering. Atop all those bodies, he might have a clearer view of the road ahead. You Know Why I Really Like Andy Reid? The guy has done a pretty good job, to this point, of putting a well coached, well dressed, well disciplined team on the field....and the players like coming to work. At least that is what I understand the locker room is like. via Pic Source Do you know how hard it is to demand discipline, the kind it takes to overcome obstacles in the NFL? And at the same time instill a sense of enjoyment for what you do? That is pretty hard to pull off. Sure, the Chiefs are 5-0. Its fun when you are 5-0. But it seems like part of the reason the Chiefs are 5-0 is due to Andy and the enjoyment he tries to bring to the game. Chief Nation Watches There are many eyes upon you Mr. Reid, eyes that watch you every day. They watch and wait, with a hope of many years, listening to every word you say. There is a stirring in this stadium, hoping you're vision is wise. Hoping that your football mind will cause our ship to rise. Our fans are wide-eyed, taking notice, and they are starting to set upright; thinking and dreaming of that day that the Chief can show it's might. So if you can, lift this burden, a burden that has brought us many tears. And we would embrace you as our coach for many many years. -btw- I loved you on the Conan Show. via Pic Source
about 5 hours ago
Jumanji!
Jumanji!
about 5 hours ago
I watched last night’s incredible PBS Frontline documentary, League of Denial, with keen interest. I have, erm, a special interest* in the suffering that can follow a person who’s had too many concussions. *the short version:...
I watched last night’s incredible PBS Frontline documentary, League of Denial, with keen interest. I have, erm, a special interest* in the suffering that can follow a person who’s had too many concussions. *the short version: I had too many concussions, and spent my early 20s in a daze, with no short-term memory, limited long-term memory, no energy, limited feeling in my hands and feet, and very few reasons to believe life would ever be worth it again. Now, thanks to a particular treatment, I’m better, but for how long? And what happens when I get my next concussion? The film was a tremendous piece of journalism. The Columbia Journalism Review’s Ryan Chittum made the point that lots of us knew most of the individual pieces of information PBS presented, and had seen some of the footage of players laying down big hits and later struggling to form complete sentences. But last night, all those disparate pieces of information were masterfully combined into one damning timeline. Someone on Twitter set the over/under at the number of mentions this film gets during NFL broadcasts this weekend at one. I took the under, confidently. How could anyone whose paycheck comes from the NFL (or a broadcasting partnership with them) find a way to bring up the film – in the midst of a game that WILL feature lots of men getting sub-concussive hits and maybe full-blown concussions – without mentioning anything harmful to the league? The filmmakers spoke with tons of family and friends, telling haunting stories of players who, it turned out, had CTE. Like Mike Webster’s friend Sunny Jani, whom Webster asked to tase him so he could fall asleep – in the seat of his truck, where he lived. He would tell people he “used to be” Mike Webster. It was 1997 when the NFL conceded that a career in the league had harmed Webster’s brain enough that they needed to pay him disability. 1997! But much later Roger Goodell’s hand-selected doctor Ira Casson curtly denied any link whatsoever between football and cognitive problems. Repeatedly. Steve Young addressed something that I struggled with when I was sick. He said something about how anyone can see a knee injury, for example, but a concussion is invisible. People can’t – and often don’t seem willing to try to -  empathize. Young described the human brain as “the last frontier.” Late in the film, someone – I think it was Ann McKee, one of the heroes of CTE/football research – said a sentence I’ve said to dozens of people, mostly teenagers, who have contacted me about how to cope with their own concussion issues: “You only get one brain.” I can’t tell any of these people what to do – it’s ultimately up to them whether to quit their sport – but I can tell them somewhat definitively that it won’t be worth it to keep putting themselves on a field where they’ll endanger their one and only brain. So how is it that I’m still a football fan? Since I published my own story this spring, I’ve counseled dozens of post-concussion sufferers. A handful have quit football. More couldn’t continue an e-mail chain so they had a family member help them type their messages for them. All have asked, in some way or another, whether there’s any hope at all for life after concussions. So how can I keep watching the sport that destroys the brains of so many of its players? Because old habits die hard, and I’m weak-willed. That’s really it. It’s harder to watch, sure, but I still do it. I don’t jump up and celebrate big hits; I get knots in my stomach every time one happens. Little by little, I watch less of it, though. I haven’t watched a single Husker game beginning-to-end yet this year, practically a mortal sin for someone born and raised in Nebraska. Someday, either because I can’t take it anymore or because the s
about 5 hours ago
If any college football coach would be at the cutting edge of risk avoidance, it would be Kirk Ferentz.
If any college football coach would be at the cutting edge of risk avoidance, it would be Kirk Ferentz.
about 5 hours ago