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Marion Brown for Discomate Japan from 1976.Alto Saxophone – Marion Brown ; Trumpet – Ambrose Jackson ; Bass – Fred Hopkins ; Bass Guitar, Guitar – Billy "Spaceman" Patterson ; Drums – Chris Henderson ; Guitar – Rene Arlain ; Percussion ...
Marion Brown for Discomate Japan from 1976.Alto Saxophone – Marion Brown ; Trumpet – Ambrose Jackson ; Bass – Fred Hopkins ; Bass Guitar, Guitar – Billy "Spaceman" Patterson ; Drums – Chris Henderson ; Guitar – Rene Arlain ; Percussion – Ed Blackwell, Juuma Santos Producer – Yoshio Ozawa First time out in blogland for this Japanese only rarity from Marion Brown for the one off Vista Series.Somewhat surprisingly this has yet to make a reissue in any format.Afro Caribbean and spiritual jazz influences abound in the often joyful music but the real bomb here is "Pepi's Tempo" with Brown, Jackson and Arlain ripping it up over a driving bed of latin percussion and a bad ass bass line.Tough...
about 1 hour ago
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1931-1953DL
2 days ago
Street Date: November 19, 2013 (Vivo Musique, DEP-Universal Music Canada- Believe)
Street Date: November 19, 2013 (Vivo Musique, DEP-Universal Music Canada- Believe)
3 days ago
When music is composed from a personal vantage point, it speaks volumes about the human condition and the society that frames any one person’s experience.  Sometimes these elements are painstakingly obvious, showing us clear rhythm...
When music is composed from a personal vantage point, it speaks volumes about the human condition and the society that frames any one person’s experience.  Sometimes these elements are painstakingly obvious, showing us clear rhythmic, harmonic, or melodic references based upon cultural traditions.  At other times, distinct pieces of culture are embedded within the context of different artistic aesthetics, but the way that they change the music makes a huge impact upon the final product.  Whatever the case, one thing is inevitable – when compositions are constructed outside the predetermined realms of popular music, they reflect directly back upon the composer, giving us a potent view of their cultural foundation. The important ties between music, art, and cultural tradition became apparent to percussionist Samuel Torres as he dug deeply into the composition of his latest piece “Forced Displacement,” which was funded by a grant from Chamber Music America. Inspired to integrate traditional Colombian music on a more meaningful level, Torres traveled back to his home country for a study of traditional bullerengue.  Filmmaker Noelia Santos accompanied Torres, intent on capturing the process for a documentary about Torres’s new piece.  The story that emerged was much more powerful than a look at a series of private lessons though – this became a look at the heart and soul of Colombia.  While Torres’ connected with important musicians, academic experts, and community members, Santos saw a country making huge strides to move past a history of violence and oppression.  The experience provided important inspiration for both musician and filmmaker to reflect upon their art and deliver something meaningful. While Samuel found the musical direction to complete and premiere “Forced Displacement,” Santos found herself with some potent footage of Colombian music and culture.  This footage became the cornerstone of a new film Tempo Rubato, which promises to be a powerful combination of Latin Jazz and Colombian culture.  Santos is currently running a KickStarter campaign to get funding for a return to trip to Colombia where Torres will debut “Forced Displacement” in Bogota.  It’s an inspiring story that deserves to be finished, so I had to hear more; fortunately, Santos was happy to answer my questions about the film.  I’m excited to see tempo Rubato, and after reading our interview with Santos I think you’ll agree – you can help make that happen by contributing to the KickStarter campaign HERE. ———- LATIN JAZZ CORNER: The idea behind the documentary seems like something that would have evolved organically – what was the initial inspiration behind the Tempo Rubato project? NOELIA SANTOS: I had always been interested in so-called ‘artist process’ films and the idea of doing a documentary about a new creative work coming into being was very appealing to me. In particular, the process of writing music seems inherently cinematic to me – there’s the progression of sounds that eventually coalesces into a phrasing that you can understand and when you hear it fall into place, you know it’s right instinctively. And it’s natural to make associations between sounds, notes, chords and images – so a film has a lot of leeway with presenting and interpreting (in exterior imagery) the interior creative process. So when I became acquainted with Samuel’s work and his new project, that idea fell into place: the film’s challenge would be how to depict the creation of this new musical work and all of its various inspirations and cross-references. LJC: Samuel is definitely an accomplished percussionist and composer with a lot to offer musically, but what makes him and his perspective on music an inspiring subject for a film? NS: Samuel’s a very focused, hard-working musician; he doesn’t bullshit around. Even though he’s not hugely popular among the gene
3 days ago
bandoneon: anibal troilo, eduardo marino, juan m. rodriguez, astor piazolla, marcos troiloviolin: reynaldo nichele, david diaz, hugo baralis, pedro sapochnikpiano: orlando goñicontrabajo: enrique diazvoc: fiorentino, amadeo mandarino1941DL
bandoneon: anibal troilo, eduardo marino, juan m. rodriguez, astor piazolla, marcos troiloviolin: reynaldo nichele, david diaz, hugo baralis, pedro sapochnikpiano: orlando goñicontrabajo: enrique diazvoc: fiorentino, amadeo mandarino1941DL
6 days ago
Big Stuff – Afro Cuban Holiday Venissa Santí Sunnyside Records When building a focal point around a recording, there’s many reasons that an artist might create an album dedicated to the repertoire of an influential musician. ...
Big Stuff – Afro Cuban Holiday Venissa Santí Sunnyside Records When building a focal point around a recording, there’s many reasons that an artist might create an album dedicated to the repertoire of an influential musician.  On the one hand, a “tribute” album takes some of the pressure off an artist, allowing them to follow in the footsteps of a well-known artist.  This may help a popular audience quickly connect with the music, but it often leads to uninspired recordings that simply rehash ideas from the past.  Responsibly undertaking a repertoire project requires some in-depth study of the influential artist, spending years digging deeply into the musical elements that made that performer great.  There needs to be some serious analysis around the original artist’s performance approaches, and some thought about why those approaches created some powerful moments.  Most importantly, an artist that undertakes a repertoire project news to embrace the creative opportunities and re-envision the original musician’s influence through their own creative artistic perspective.  When a musician really takes this part of the project to heart, listeners get a unique insight into the way that the influencer shaped this younger musician as they hear the music in the same way its being heard by the artist.  An honest and studied tribute to an influential artist lets us remember the influential moments and capture some new ideas, leaving us with a rich emotional connection to both the role model and the student.  Vocalist Vanessa Santí lovingly revisits the repertoire of influential vocalist Billie Holiday on Big Stuff – Afro Cuban Holiday, smartly framing the legendary vocalist’s massive influence within the Cuban context of Santí’s world. Wrapping Holiday’s Repertoire Around Cuban Folkloric Styles The vocalist digs deeply into her roots on several tracks, arranging several prime pieces of Holiday’s repertoire around folkloric Cuban styles.  A freely interpreted vocal melody from Santí leads the rhythm section into a ferocious vamp to introduce “On The Sunny Side Of The Street,” dripping with tension as the groove tears through alternating time signatures and Santí trades riffs with trumpet player Tim Thompson.  Percussionists François Zayas and Cuco Castellanos transition the group into an uptempo rumba guaguanco as Santí interprets the classic melody with a floating sense of jazz interpretation that sits comfortably within the fine line between swing and clave.  Pianist John Stenger drives the band forward with a burning montuno, setting the stage for lyrical improvisation from guitarist Jef Lee Johnson that takes the group back to Santí’s wonderful phrasing on the melody.  Zayas makes a commanding entrance with thundering Tumba Francesa percussion amid bold bass and piano attacks until Santí delivers the first piece of the melody on “Big Stuff,” accompanied by several layers of overdubbed harmonies.  Santí’s vocal performance demonstrates a deep understanding of the cultural connection between jazz and Cuban rhythms, as she maintains a relaxed swing over a varying backdrop of percussion and drum kit.  Thompson and Johnson both get opportunities to fill the gaps between Santí’s phrases with improvised licks, but Zayas steals the show with some powerful solos on both drum kit and percussion.  Santí expertly wraps the lyric to “I Cover The Waterfront” around an up-tempo rumba clave while Zayas quintos around her on cajón with a clever sense of call and response before the rest of the rhythm section enters with a floating freedom.  After some interesting improvisation exchanges between Aschman, Santí, and Stenger, the vocalist scats through the melody to “Monk’s Dream” that takes the song into a fascinatingly complimentary new approach.  The instrumentalists take turns soloing through the jazz harmony, with
8 days ago
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1930DL
9 days ago
New Music Video "Ayer Y Hoy" By Lokixximo Released Worldwide Today
New Music Video "Ayer Y Hoy" By Lokixximo Released Worldwide Today
10 days ago
Lokixximo Lands First Number One Most Popular Song In Jamendo
Lokixximo Lands First Number One Most Popular Song In Jamendo
10 days ago
There’s something wonderful about seeing unexpected combinations in music that says so much about the infinite possibilities behind jazz. The reality is that any jazz musician with proper training and experience can find their way...
There’s something wonderful about seeing unexpected combinations in music that says so much about the infinite possibilities behind jazz. The reality is that any jazz musician with proper training and experience can find their way into a collaboration; the style is a common language and fluent musicians can easily speak it. It’s a highly personal style though, that leads to some drastically different performance approaches. As a result, some musicians simply work better together than others. While it’s always fun to see these musicians work their magic onstage, there’s something fascinating about seeing the unexpected combinations. When there’s just a little bit of tension that comes from slightly different artistic visions, the performance can be inspiring and exploratory. There’s one thing for sure – these concerts with unexpected pairing are certainly memorable. When considering a cross between Afro-Cuban jazz and stateside jazz legends, I never would have considered a match between pianist Chucho Valdés and saxophonist Archie Shepp . . . that’s only due to my shortsighted view of the music. While my mind tends to go to the obvious choices – I might think about someone like David Sanchez or Miguel Zenón collaborating with Valdés, but there’s lots of reasons that Shepp makes a good match for the pianist. Before joining pianist Cecil Taylor’s band and diving headfirst into the avant-garde, Shepp was actually a member of a Latin Jazz band. He immersed himself deeply in African music and culture in the sixties, and although he moved in other directions later, his connection to the continent and the music of the African diaspora continued. In the decades that followed, Shepp consistently explored new avenues, moving between traditional jazz, R n’ B, blues, and so much more. He hasn’t been restrained by style or artistic ideals, Shepp has just been a huge fan and advocate of music. That’s the sort of person that makes the perfect collaborator for Valdés, a virtuoso that tips his feet into classical, jazz, funk, Cuban dance music and more. In reality, these two musicians are a perfect match. This video features a concert that lasts almost an hour with Shepp acting as a guest soloist in front of Valdés and his Afro-Cuban Messengers. While Shepp sits in front of the group, Valdés and his band are the fire that sends the music blazing into a ferocious frenzy. There’s a sense of class and refinement in Valdés’ playing that can quickly alternate between a gentle sensitivity and an intensely massive groove. Shepp’s rough tone and wide vibrato contrast the technically refined and explosive nature of Valdés’ band, but it’s that contrast that adds a beautiful propulsion to the music. While The Afro-Cuban Messengers push the groove and Valdés approaches the harmony from every angle, Shepp remains his visceral self, soloing with an emotive transparency that’s simply engaging. There’s moments of contrast that highlight the individual strengths of the musicians, but more importantly, there’s a common understanding that allows for some free flowing and beautiful music on stage. This is a concert that’s well worth spending time watching, that shows two masters at work, using their vast insight and experience to make unforgettable music. I’ve listed musicians and songs below, so you can attach names with faces and sounds. I hope that you enjoy the show, it’s a great way to see the well known sides of Valdés and Shepp, as well as a different perspective on their musicianship. Musicians: Archie Shepp – saxophone Chucho Valdés – piano Carlos Manuel Miyares Hernandez – tenor saxophone Reinaldo Melián Alvarez – trumpet Lázaro Rivero Alarcón – bass Yaroldy Abreu Robles – congas & percussion Dreiser Durruthy Bombalé – voice & batá Juan
11 days ago