Makeup And Perfume

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Jean-Luc Godard hit the nail hair on the head when he said, “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.”  When it comes to inspiration, we think everything is worth looking at (have you seen our Monday Moodboards?)....
Jean-Luc Godard hit the nail hair on the head when he said, “It’s not where you take things from—it’s where you take them to.”  When it comes to inspiration, we think everything is worth looking at (have you seen our Monday Moodboards?). Which is why we occasionally look for hairspiration in unexpected places—more recently atop the heads of some delightfully handsome dudes. If the hair-of-the-moment is a “I don’t own a brush or shampoo,” perfectly disheveled grunge tress mess à la Kurt Cobain [3-5] (just ask Eugene Souleiman, who told us, while sweeping models hair into Jared-Leto-esque buns [33] at Peter Som, “No brush. Hell no.”), we've got to hand it to the guys for getting there first. Something tells us—and this is just a hunch—that Nirvana’s front man likely did not invest in Nivea Cold Creme or surf spray. It just was. (Buddhists would call this "suchness.") And while we can’t promise Mick [22], Steven [27, 28], or Sebastian [13-15] levels of product-free zen-head perfection, remember: that’s what products are for. Whether in the length, shape, color, or texture, man hair can be awesome and sexy, and it can be sexy on you. So choose a chap—perhaps Leo’s mid-‘90s locks (as did Emily earlier this year), Troy Polamalu’s million-dollar-insured mane, or Alex Wang’s blunt cut [12]—and print out some pics for your next appointment.
about 2 hours ago
How about continuing to mention those things that are not flattering as we age. I know I feel this way when I see it on other women. Either we are doing it ourselves or we know someone who is. You just have to see what works for you....
How about continuing to mention those things that are not flattering as we age. I know I feel this way when I see it on other women. Either we are doing it ourselves or we know someone who is. You just have to see what works for you. Nothing is written in stone. But be willing to take a fresh look at how you apply makeup as well as the colors and textures. Everything old is new again If you've lived long enough, you've lived to see makeup trends recycle, but they are usually tweaked. If you don't know how they tweaked it, study it until you know. In general, if you've worn it once before in your lifetime, it is likely not new on you, it is just old looking. Those who have never worn it, think it is new, and it looks better on them than on you. Think thick eye liner, for example. It looks harsh, the older you are, unless you have an olive or a deeper complexion. Or not. Or it very well might work for you. Still, again, be willing to take a fresh look at what you are doing: how you are applying and what colors you are using. Speaking of generalities In general, the older you are, the softer you could go in your makeup. Soften it somehow and see what you think. Sharp lines and colors accentuate; softer lines (smudged) and colors obscure. You can still use darks, just carefully. Keep current We'll talk about this a lot in SavvyThinker. I didn't mention NYX or MAC anywhere else -- these are both current. See the eyeshadow section for other brands. ~~~~~~~~~~ Allure lists 10 beauty mistakes here with pictures. Let's talk about them! Thick foundation No one likes to look at a mask -- and the more lines on your face, the more the foundation is liable to drift. Better to have it a little more sheer. If you are covering marks or scars, try a little more there, rather than your whole face. I have heard that nothing adheres to scars very well, so you will have to experiment to see what works. Dermablend Cover Creme is made to cover scars. You must use Dermablend Setting Powder in order for it to be waterproof. It does not smear on clothes. Dermablend - Cover Creme Perfection Kit is another way to try it. There are also Quick Fix Concealers in different colors. Too pale foundation First, use a primer. I'll talk more about this in the next few days. Second, highlight your face. We'll talk more about this too. You already know about my sparkly powder mix. Foundation color is very important -- to get the right hue and depth for your skin. In theater makeup, the lighter the foundation the older a person will look once you had the lines for wrinkles. It's equally bad to use a foundation that is too dark. Remember to reassess the color between summer and winter if you are darker in one season. Ideally, you should aim for no color definition between your face and your neck. Choose a foundation and or powder with luminescence, because light reflects off of it. Therefore, it acts like a veil and obscures imperfections. Heavy concealer on dark circles Again, choose a concealer with luminescence for the same reasons as above. Heavy concealer will only drift into your laugh lines. And it really doesn't hide. I sometimes find that no concealer works as well as using any. Face powder on top of lines Don't ever powder under the eyes. Only once did I have a MUA do this on me -- I was surprised she didn't know this. I let her do it, just to see if her powder was different. It was awful. She removed it and started again. Better to have some moisture under the eyes. Again, it obscures. If you are super-super-super oily, you might be able to powder. Try it and see which looks better through the day. I would tend not to powder, then use the paper blotters if oil comes through. Blush on the apples of the cheeks Isn't it funny how so many application tips say to put it on the apples of the cheeks. I was originally taught to put it high on the cheek bones. Keep it at least one finger from the nose. Fade it out as it get
about 10 hours ago
Today I was busy sorting and organizing. I only did my makeup about 5 mins ago. The theme makeup this week at AL is to use Snapdragon (beautiful blue pink)(I'm not sure I've ever used this before) with Aqua Nightmare (one of my favorit...
Today I was busy sorting and organizing. I only did my makeup about 5 mins ago. The theme makeup this week at AL is to use Snapdragon (beautiful blue pink)(I'm not sure I've ever used this before) with Aqua Nightmare (one of my favorite colors.) If you can't have fun with makeup, when can you?! I got the idea to reverse my eyes, sort of like combining all my posts from last week. It looked strange at first, but I figured my liner would tie it all together. I am really happy with it now. Eyes: all Aromaleigh unless noted, in order of application Base: Nude Frost Crease: Lagoon matte Outer corner of one eye and inner corner of the other (and reverse drylined on bottom): Snapdragon, then vice versa for Aqua Nightmare Tight lined top and wet lined lower: Peacock gel liner -- using back end of brush only. Inner corners: Snapdragon Drylined top only: Moonagedaydream Brows: Merle Norman powder Mascara, top: Guerlain; lower: Tarte Concealer: Mary Kay Sunscreen: La Prairie Primer: Avon Magix Foundation: Chanel, discontinued Rouge under powder: Revlon , cream Powder: My sparkly mix, then SCA Hyaluronic with stiff Guerlain brush Blush over powder: EL Pinkshimmer, then NARS Riviera as it didn't have enough color Lips: AL Karma on one lip; Gala on the other; smooshed; rimmed with Beauté Allure What do you think? Karin Originally posted 2009-05-12 15:40:13.
about 22 hours ago
Variety may be the spice of life, but ain’t it a house of cards when it comes to your makeup counter (i.e., having ten mascaras or lipsticks not only makes it that much harder to find the one you’re looking for, but searching for the rig...
Variety may be the spice of life, but ain’t it a house of cards when it comes to your makeup counter (i.e., having ten mascaras or lipsticks not only makes it that much harder to find the one you’re looking for, but searching for the right one usually ends in a game of beauty-product dominos). Which is part of the reason why settling on that one-to-rule-them-all product, whatever the sub-genre (blush, bronzer, eyelash curler), feels pretty grown up, because we’re making choices. Well, Mom, Dad, dear readers, we've met someone, and we're ready to settle down: Make Up For Ever’s Professional #152 Medium Highlighter Brush. Flexible enough for a powder, stiff enough for a foundation, this chinchilla-soft synthetic brush basically has your whole face covered. Swirl on a film of Kevyn Aucoin Sensual Skin Tinted Balm and build for a tone-evening tinted moisturizer or seamlessly-blended, medium-weight foundation. You could also use it to delicately powder your t-zone with HD High Definition Powder to stay on the sheen side of shine. Or swoosh on some Nars Orgasm to get that post-O glow. Or, play it safe and use it for its intended purpose: to highlight your best assets. (If only it were small enough for eye shadow...) The best part? Having to clean just one (great-looking) brush means we're more likely to keep our New Year’s resolution. So, save the 'variety' for your Seamless account and Godspeed. Photos by Mathea Millman.
1 day ago
Want to see a movie about astronauts (potentially) lost in space? Check your local listings (Gravity). How about one featuring superheroes saving New York City from total annihilation? Been made, grossed millions, and got nominated for a...
Want to see a movie about astronauts (potentially) lost in space? Check your local listings (Gravity). How about one featuring superheroes saving New York City from total annihilation? Been made, grossed millions, and got nominated for an Oscar (The Avengers). In today’s world, when we sit down at the movies, we often expect to spend 90-plus minutes being rocked (sometimes literally) by special effects. In fact, it’s almost a special occasion to see a film without digital bells and whistles (The Artist, you're not getting away scott free!). And though we know that Johnny Depp didn’t really battle skeleton pirates (Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl), there are times the line between real and computer-generated becomes blurred, if not utterly beside the point. Take, for example, Baz Luhrmann’s recent adaptation of The Great Gatsby. Though the director is known for his heavy-handed use of VFX, the story is grounded in a potentially realistic 1920s world, which left us wondering what was actually on set, what was merely enhanced, and what was complete digital fabrication. Well, look no further for the answer. Above, a perspective-shifting clip recently released by the film's VFX supervisor that gives us a peek behind the (computer-generated) curtain.
1 day ago
When it comes to nail appliques, few brands can touch Sally Hansen and their Salon Effects Real Nail Polish Strips in terms of ease of application and wear. Being one of a handful of brands to use actual nail polish, the strips are thin ...
When it comes to nail appliques, few brands can touch Sally Hansen and their Salon Effects Real Nail Polish Strips in terms of ease of application and wear. Being one of a handful of brands to use actual nail polish, the strips are thin and flexible, which means they conform to the nail and leave no ragged edges. Sally Hansen Salon Effects - Fall 2013 Affiliate Link|Press Sample For Fall 2013, the Sally Hansen Salon Effects collection has a strong Asian influence. Everything from delicate florals to koi fish to metallic animal prints make an appearance in this collection, including a peacock-inspired pattern that I need to buy backups of, stat! Formula & Application: Sally Hansen Salon Effects are made with real nail polish and are 5-Free (Formaldehyde, Toluene, DBP, Formaldehyde Resin, Camphor) however because they have a different formula than the regular Sally Hansen nail polish I suggest you read the ingredients in full before purchasing to avoid allergic reactions.  Each Salon Effects package includes 16 strips in varying sizes, a cuticle stick and mini file/buffer. Application instructions are included with each package and are very easy to understand.  You select the correct size strip for each nail, peel off the protective film, detach the polish strip from the backing, press on to the nail and file off the excess.  What’s great about these strips is that each end has a different shape, one rounded the other squared, so you can find a good fit for your cuticle line. Application tips: Warm the strips with your hands to make them more pliable. Bend the strip over your free edge and use the file to remove the excess rather than tearing it off.  Tearing can result in an uneven edge. Between sizes?  Size up and use the enclosed cuticle stick to push down around the cuticle, breaking off the excess. Don’t submerge in water right after applying.  I took a shower shortly after applying and the pinkie strip popped right off and my ring finger pulled up some.  I pushed the ring finger back down and it lasted fine but I suggest waiting a couple hours before bathing. Store any excess strips in an airtight baggie. Air exposure will dry out the strips, causing them to harden. Remove with nail polish remover. The glitters are actually easier to remove than traditional glitter nail polish. Note: I find that the glitter and metallic based designs are more flexible and easier to apply so they’re great for beginners. Patterns with a white background tend to be stiffer. My theory is that it takes more white polish to get the background opaque, resulting in a thicker strip. This past weekend, I was in a rush and didn’t have time for my usual manicure routine so I turned to Salon Effects to get me through. I love that as soon as they’re applied, I can function like a normal human being. I’ve been wearing Sally Hansen Full Plume since Saturday morning and it still looks as perfect and shiny as the day I applied it. Is it perfect? No, but no one is getting all up in my nail business like a macro lens. From a normal viewing distance, they look flawless. Sally Hansen Full Plume What sets nail polish strips apart from other appliques is that the stickers are made of a plastic or polymer so they don’t lie flat on nails with an irregular curve. And when you file off the edge, it’s hard to get a smooth finish or avoid lifting. With Salon Effects, those issues are, well, a non-issue. The only downside to Salon Effects is that you can’t take them off over and over, like you can with stickers, to ensure perfect placement. That’s why I line up the strip with my cuticle first and don’t press down on the nail until I can tell if it will line up. Lifting just a portion at the base of the nail can happen without damaging the strip. Just don’t do it too many times. Below are up-close photos of the actual Sally Hansen Salon Effects designs in this collection. Ama-zen and On The Prowl are example
1 day ago
"I have been running Cupcakes and Cashmere for five and a half years. I just turned 30. I guess I got my start by studying sociology and media studies at Scripps College in Claremont, California—I was the head of sales at the school news...
"I have been running Cupcakes and Cashmere for five and a half years. I just turned 30. I guess I got my start by studying sociology and media studies at Scripps College in Claremont, California—I was the head of sales at the school newspaper. I would go to a cute boutique or think of a storage facility that all of the students would need to use at the end of the year, and get these places to place ads in our paper. The experience was minimal at best, but it helped me get a job after college. During my senior year, I decided that I wanted to work at Condé Nast—I didn’t even think of having a backup plan. I looked at their journalistic integrity, the quality of their photographs, and I was just like, 'This is where I want to be.’ So I went through the magazines’ mastheads, called the LA office and said, ‘I would love to meet with the HR director.’ I didn’t have a car at the time, so even getting from Claremont to LA involved walking to the bus station, taking the Metro Link in, then the subway, then a bus, and then I walked the rest of the way. [Laughs] It was bananas how much determination I had. Even now I’m like, ‘Oh god, if I couldn’t valet my car I probably wouldn’t do it.’ [Laughs] The day after I graduated, a really great position opened up at Condé Nast—sales assistant for Teen Vogue and Domino. My parents had driven down to Claremont to bring me back home to Marin County [in Northern California], and we stopped at Condé's LA office along the way so I could interview. I had my fingers crossed, because if I didn’t get the job, I would have gone straight to living in my parents' basement. But, I got the job. I didn’t fit into the editorial side of things at all at Condé. My style wasn’t there yet—I’m talking Rocket Dog platform flip-flops. And I was so worried about looking like a college student that I ended up looking like a frumpy grandma in long pencil skirts and oversized blazers. I just didn’t look the part; I’ve always been more business-savvy than fashion-forward. But being there and seeing everyone in the hallways, the gorgeous racks of clothes, the Allure beauty closet, it made me step up my style game. And though I always thought my natural career progression would be on the advertising side—I saw the sellers taking people out to every meal and doing really well for themselves, and it seemed like a straightforward job—I became enamored with style. I was reading so many magazines every week, and developing my sense of what I like to wear, what I felt comfortable in. I also knew I would get bored in sales eventually—that’s kind of where the idea started to come to me, to combine the two sides [editorial and advertising], melding my business background with defining my own editorial identity: to create a site, understand the value of it, know the demographic I reached, and then be able to monetize it. But it wasn’t until I was working in ad sales at AOL in 2008 that I got the idea for Cupcakes and Cashmere. I would get bored at work, and for fun, I'd write online restaurant reviews that encompassed the food, the décor, and the vibe. But I wanted to create an online destination that combined all my favorite things—fashion, beauty, interior design, and food. You didn’t really see all of those elements intertwining anywhere online. And, as much as 'food girls' love food and 'fashion girls' love fashion, a lot of girls share those passions. So I designed the original Cupcakes and Cashmere. It was quite literal—I think the header was an actual cupcake and a goat to symbolize cashmere. It was absolutely atrocious. [Laughs] It’s come a long way. I had no idea what I was doing, and Googled something about HTML and back-end questions about 150 times a day. I think if you’re dedicated and proactive enough, you can really figure it all out for yourself. I started by setting a goal to write something every day, and stick to it. It’s funny—I thought I was successful when I wrote consistently for three months. That felt great,
1 day ago
The first time I heard of the word 'sticky' being applied to ideas was when I read the book The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. It took me a long time to get into the book, but I knew it would be up my alley o...
The first time I heard of the word 'sticky' being applied to ideas was when I read the book The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. It took me a long time to get into the book, but I knew it would be up my alley once I got started as it had sections on the 'stickiness' of advertising (which I've been involved with a lot with the stores I once owned.) It begins with why some health epidemics take off and others don't. Even that was an interesting section and gave me a lot to think about. Once I got into the book, I found it insightful. I like his second book as well. Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking. He develops the idea that it is possible to develop our ability to make snap decisions that are right, because gut instinct is sometimes better than a more reasoned approach, which misses the point at times. (He also has an interesting section on a top car salesman who intentionally does not make snap decisions as to who will buy or not, but treats everyone the same.) Here's a review of another book about sticky ideas in case you wondered why some ideas stick in your thought and others don't. Kind of like how some songs will replay themselves in your mind if you even hear part of the lyrics. Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Karin Originally posted 2007-01-23 15:56:45.
1 day ago
You can have your pick of versions or listen to both. Hmmm...makes me wish my name were Layla. One of the best songs of all time. Karin Live at the Crossroads, rock version: Layla - Mark Knopfler and Eric Clapton duet -- accoustic ver...
You can have your pick of versions or listen to both. Hmmm...makes me wish my name were Layla. One of the best songs of all time. Karin Live at the Crossroads, rock version: Layla - Mark Knopfler and Eric Clapton duet -- accoustic version, a real love ballad. Mark Knopfler is great! Originally posted 2007-02-09 07:56:11.
2 days ago
"I had the idea to start Cupcakes and Cashmere in March of 2008. I had just left Condé Nast to go to AOL, because I felt a shift going online. Even then I would finish my work early and be bored out of my mind, like, 'What can I do now?!...
"I had the idea to start Cupcakes and Cashmere in March of 2008. I had just left Condé Nast to go to AOL, because I felt a shift going online. Even then I would finish my work early and be bored out of my mind, like, 'What can I do now?!' I started creeping online by doing restaurant reviews on Yelp and CitySearch. Looking back at them now is painful—I’ll never tell you my Yelp screen name. [Laughs] But I liked writing about food and décor, and I realized I wanted to continue to do that. I also loved fashion, and even though those ideas seemed mutually exclusive, I thought there must be people like me who wanted to get dressed up and have a great meal with their friends. My goal was just to write and create things I was passionate about, to keep myself inspired. I still can’t believe that I was able to turn it into a full-time job. I just turned 30, and I was 24 when I started it. Now my husband runs the business side of things and we have a creative designer on the team. As much as I'm interested in fashion, my style is still constantly evolving. I’ve gotten a lot better at not looking at trends as much, and only adopting trends that work for me and work for my body. I have a pretty athletic build, which is not always meant for high fashion. There's nothing wrong with that, but you don’t see that body type celebrated as much. When I was in my soccer uniform or out on the basketball court, I would be like, ‘I’m strong! I feel great!’ Yet when I try on something at Barneys that won’t go over my big bust or strong shoulders, I don’t always feel like I fit in. I know the uniform that makes me feel best: a slouchy jean or a skinny jean, a slouchy tank top, a good pump, and a fitted blazer to bring it all together.  My favorite boyfriend jeans are by Gap and my favorite blazer is from Elizabeth & James. Their blazers are consistently cut for a woman’s body. They always make me feel stylish and put together without being stuffy. As much as I stay pretty consistent with my fashion, I like to experiment with makeup. It’s so fun to play with. Not that I know what I’m doing—I’m not professional by any means. I’m like a sponge, so I try to learn as much as I can from makeup artists, and I do a lot of online research, but I got into makeup very late. I was a tomboy for most of my life, until I was like 15. I didn’t even get my ears pierced until I was 18! I was all about a slicked-back ponytail and I had a unibrow! [Laughs] I didn’t really start caring about fashion or makeup until college, which is silly, because I went to an all-girls liberal arts school—Scripps College in Claremont. And then, right after, when I was [doing ad sales] at Condé Nast. I would walk through the hallways being like, ‘I need to step up my game.’ I started to experiment, but there were some mistakes, obviously. I’m still willing to try a lot, from a fluorescent-orange lip to an extended cat eye, but now I have a day-to-day routine. I just recently started using Giorgio Armani Luminous Silk Foundation, which I cut with St. Tropez Skin Illuminator, so it’s a little glow-y and not as foundation-y; I never like the look of completely opaque skin. I’m all about the glow, but I don’t want shine. So, to combat that, I use Makeup For Ever HD Powder on my forehead. It’s something I learned from working with a makeup artist...but you have to be minimal with it because I’ve seen these crazy photos of people who look completely white when the flash hits them. I use TimeBomb concealer, which I found at Sephora years ago, because it actually stays put instead of disappearing in half an hour. My other favorite thing right now is Armani Bronze Mania. I lack any real facial definition—I don’t have any cheek bones or anything—so it's really important for me to fake it with contouring. And Bronze Mania doesn’t look like bronzer, it just looks like a natural shadow on your face. I apply it with the Nars #21 brush. On my cheeks, I also like Estée Lauder’s new Cheek Gel, but I love
2 days ago