Marketing

add news feed

tweet a story

A month ago, Pinterest posted an announcement on their blog saying they were going to “start experimenting with promoting certain pins from a select group of businesses.” They were concerned that users would be concerned, but...
A month ago, Pinterest posted an announcement on their blog saying they were going to “start experimenting with promoting certain pins from a select group of businesses.” They were concerned that users would be concerned, but they went on to assure everyone that it wouldn’t be a big deal. Today, Pinterest updated that announcement post to say that promoted pins are now live. Does anyone else find it odd that they updated a month old post rather than post something at the top of their blog. . . . Anyway, here’s how it goes: We wanted to let you know that we are starting our first test with promoting pins today, so you may spot a few in your search results or category feeds on the web or in mobile apps. Here’s what they look like: They work just like regular pins, only they have a special “promoted” label, along with a link to learn more about what that means. Remember we’re still just testing things out right now, so we’d really like to hear what you think. We’ll be listening closely to what you have to say, and will continue to keep you posted about how things go. If you click that link, you’ll go to a form where you can tell them how you feel about these posts. Back in September, 80 people had something to say about it and – as you can imagine – most of the comments were negative. The truth is, if they hadn’t told you there were promoted pins, you probably wouldn’t notice because Pinterest is full of pins that look just like the promoted one. Almost every shoe photo comes right from a retailer’s catalog. Nearly every gadget, home decor item and toy is something you can buy. Now, Pinterest is making brands pay for the privilege of posting. For the average Pinterest user, it’s a non-issue. I suppose most of the complainers aren’t really concerned about a branded blot in their otherwise pristine Pinterest feed. It’s the concept that’s killing them, that Pinterest would dare to presume what they like or would not like. Advertising! Humbug! But if you ask those same people to pay for Pinterest, they won’t do it. I’ll never understand how people can expect websites to operate for free – or in this case – ad free. Good luck, Pinterest. I’m with you on this one. Pilgrim’s Partners: SponsoredReviews.com – Bloggers earn cash, Advertisers build buzz!
about 3 hours ago
The birth of modern cities allowed entrepreneurship to blossom as innovators and entrepreneurs were forced into close quarters.
The birth of modern cities allowed entrepreneurship to blossom as innovators and entrepreneurs were forced into close quarters.
about 3 hours ago
The focus on Wall Street and corporate careers has led to a drop in America's dynamic innovative growth.
The focus on Wall Street and corporate careers has led to a drop in America's dynamic innovative growth.
about 3 hours ago
Changing education, youth attitudes and government policy are all prescriptions for increasing innovation and growth in our economy.
Changing education, youth attitudes and government policy are all prescriptions for increasing innovation and growth in our economy.
about 3 hours ago
The risk of pork barrel politics is that businesses start to expend resources on lobbying the government instead of innovation.
The risk of pork barrel politics is that businesses start to expend resources on lobbying the government instead of innovation.
about 3 hours ago
Nobel laureate Edmund Phelps tracks the rise and fall of dynamic economies and explains the problems facing innovation and entrepreneurship in America.
Nobel laureate Edmund Phelps tracks the rise and fall of dynamic economies and explains the problems facing innovation and entrepreneurship in America.
about 3 hours ago
Edmund Phelps outlines the historical emergence of flourishing economies, which value career satisfaction, creativity and individualism.
Edmund Phelps outlines the historical emergence of flourishing economies, which value career satisfaction, creativity and individualism.
about 3 hours ago
I’ve always been fascinated by time, the most precious resource. I’m also clearly a fan of infographics and data visualizations. At the intersection of those two, there’s a cool series of graphics over on the blog wait ...
I’ve always been fascinated by time, the most precious resource. I’m also clearly a fan of infographics and data visualizations. At the intersection of those two, there’s a cool series of graphics over on the blog wait but why showing time in context.The whole post (linked above) is worth checking out and will help you think about (and more clearly understand) timescales in various contexts. As explained by the author:Humans are good at a lot of things, but putting time in perspective is not one of them.  It’s not our fault—the spans of time in human history, and even more so in natural history, are so vast compared to the span of our life and recent history that it’s almost impossible to get a handle on it. …To try to grasp some perspective, I mapped out the history of time as a series of growing timelines—each timeline contains all the previous timelines (colors will help you see which timelines are which).  All timeline lengths are exactly accurate to the amount of time they’re expressing.This is a great example of visual storytelling and distilling a complex and abstract concept into something easily digestible. Yes, the post itself and images are long, but they draw you in and provide a compelling journey to follow. Another reminder you shouldn’t necessarily try and create something brief simply to be brief. If your concept is more complex don’t be afraid to spend more time with it and create something longer-form. There’s nothing wrong with that if it makes sense to tell your story. The right audiences are intelligent and will understand and appreciate your effort.Cool Visualization: Putting Time In Perspective is from The Future Buzz, a Blog Covering Digital Marketing. You should follow Adam on Twitter and Google+ .
about 3 hours ago
All show and no go? Here are three signs a founder loves the idea of building a start-up more than the actual work it requires.Wannabes exist in any occupation, hobby, profession, or undertaking. It's like a variation on the old joke tha...
All show and no go? Here are three signs a founder loves the idea of building a start-up more than the actual work it requires.Wannabes exist in any occupation, hobby, profession, or undertaking. It's like a variation on the old joke that people who can't do something, teach it. Except in this case instead of teaching, wannabes talk. And just like everything else, entrepreneurship has its own set of wannabes, which JP Mangalindan at Fortune cleverly calls wantrepreneurs.He's referring to a certain type of person in and around Silicon Valley:I'm not talking about the hardworking folks who live and breathe their ideas, sleeping on shared office sofas, paying themselves just enough to scrape by. I mean the rest. Ask them what they do, and they'll say they're working on a startup. Ask them what the startup is, and the answer can be comical. One first-timer said he was still working on the idea, that he'd think about it, and that he'd get back to me. Well, thanks, buddy, but people don't say they're mothers or fathers before they even have kids.Being an entrepreneur is tough. You can usually bet on very long hours and hard work early on with no promise for success. It can be much more glamorous to imagine that you're an entrepreneur and skip the messy part.However, the line between entrepreneur and wantrepreneur is blurred. A little bit of the latter won't kill you, but stray too far and you could find yourself one of the modern lotus eaters, stuck in a dazed state while others are off on the real odyssey. Here are some clues that you may have started to step over the line.Too much talk--Entrepreneurs are excited about their ventures and naturally enjoy talking about them. Some amount of conversation and discussion is necessary. But talk can drain you of the necessary energy for actually accomplishing something. The more time you spend in meetings, conferences, and networking events, the less you invest on creating the product or service you should be selling, meaning that you stray further from having an established business.Too much focus on ideas--How can ideas be a danger? Don't entrepreneurs trade on having a better idea? Yes, to a point. But ask experienced and accomplished entrepreneurs and investors and you'll likely hear that ideas are a dime a dozen. What matters is turning them into reality. If you keep focused on the theory of what could happen and not an actual implementation, you never learn what works and doesn't and won't see if your idea can actually sustain a stable business. More doing, less daydreaming.Too much focus on raising money--Surely I've gone off my rocker here, right? Lack of capital is one of the big hurdles for the entrepreneur, and I can speak from experience how difficult it can make life. But if you spend all your time raising money, you're not building something that an investor might see as evidence of your ability to bring a business to fruition. If you don't get the money you want, are you going to give up? No? Then actually get to work and raise the money in addition to everything else you need to do.Notice that all three points involve the words "too much." Not all the inclinations of the wantrepreneur are automatically bad. It's just when they become unbalanced that they can scuttle your efforts. Forget about fame. Forget about prestige. Work hard to bring your sensible idea (and not the pitch Mangalindan got for the "Airbnb for medical scrubs") into fruition. Get something working. Challenge your assumptions. Make your business real.
about 4 hours ago
RT @Chris_Smth: @jowyang we linked to your firm's research in the column on @Inc today #Peoplework
RT @Chris_Smth: @jowyang we linked to your firm's research in the column on @Inc today #Peoplework
about 4 hours ago