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According to Mike Puma, Carlos Beltran “won’t rule out” returning to the Mets (Beltran said it while laughing, by the way). Puma also tweeted, however, that the Mets consider his diminished defense an “issue̶...
According to Mike Puma, Carlos Beltran “won’t rule out” returning to the Mets (Beltran said it while laughing, by the way). Puma also tweeted, however, that the Mets consider his diminished defense an “issue” (I laughed while reading that, by the way). In other news, another former Mets outfielder is “open” to returning to Flushing — Marlon Byrd. Byrd told Kristie Ackert of the Daily News, “I’ve talked to Sandy, I told him thank you for the opportunity at the beginning of the year and thank you for the opportunity to play for a winner,” Byrd said of his conversation with the Mets general manager. “I told him, ‘If you want me back, I would love to come back’. “Terry Collins already knows, the team owners already know, the players definitely know. I let them all know I loved it there.” I’m SURRRRRRE these postures have nothing to do with negotiating leverage / keeping all options open on the free agent market. Hey, why not bring back Jason Bay as well, and make it an all-former-Met, “Killer Bs” outfield? Is it too early to start discussing these fantasies? Is it as crazy to think that Beltran will return as it is Bay? Which of the two is more likely to be wearing a Mets uniform in 2014? Mets Item of the Day So, I got caught in the rain on Monday, which reminded me I need an umbrella. Maybe you need one too? Here are a few with the Mets logo that you can buy on Amazon right now — one foldable, and another a large-sized brolly for the golf course. Foldable: Golf Size:
about 2 hours ago
MATT HARVEY, RHP PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS The Mets were patient in bringing up Matt Harvey last year and it paid off. After making a splash with 10 mostly eye opening starts and leaving a strong impression with his poise and command, it wa...
MATT HARVEY, RHP PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS The Mets were patient in bringing up Matt Harvey last year and it paid off. After making a splash with 10 mostly eye opening starts and leaving a strong impression with his poise and command, it was anticipated Harvey would take the next step and become a solid starter in the rotation. Harvey outpitched his experience and numbers with an ability to mix his pitches and throw breaking pitches in fastball counts. Never mind Harvey’s 3-5 record in 2012, but instead look at his 2.73 ERA and 70 to 26 strikeouts-to-walks ratio. Harvey had a dominant 10.6 strikeouts per-nine-innings average. Those 70 strikeouts came in 59.1 innings, which screams domination. With Johan Santana out, the Mets hoped Harvey would step into the No. 2 role in the rotation behind Jon Niese. When the season began the Mets did not have an innings limit on Harvey as the Washington Nationals did with Stephen Strasburg. However, that changed as the season progressed, and perhaps it was too late. CAREER STATS 2013 SEASON REVIEW After winning his first five decisions and seven of eight, Harvey had the world in the palm of his hand. He was on the cover of Sports Illustrated, showcased on the late-night talk shows and dating a supermodel, with pictures of him on the back pages in the midst of public displays of affection. All that was the result of what he did on the mound, as he overpowered hitters from the beginning and started the All-Star Game. There was talk of him being a Cy Young Award candidate. However, he lost three of his last four decisions and had 12 no-decisions before sustaining a partial ligament tear in his elbow. Harvey complained of tightness in his right forearm prior to the break, of which Terry Collins professed no knowledge. Harvey was truly dominating with 191 strikeouts in 178.1 innings, and walking just 31 with a microscopic 0.93 WHIP and 2.27 ERA. LOOKING AT 2014 John Delcos Says: Harvey eschewed immediate surgery to opt for rest and rehabilitation before starting a throwing program in the hope of being ready for spring training. The Mets hoped Harvey could pitch in the Arizona Fall League as a test, but that is becoming remote. Harvey will be re-examined in late October or early November, and if there’s not sufficient healing in the tear, surgery is still on the table. Harvey is taking a risk that if he doesn’t have surgery, he could further tear the ligament next summer and would miss the rest of next year and 2015 as well. If he has the surgery now he could conceivably be ready next September, which would be important if the Mets are competitive. The way things are progressing it appears Harvey will undergo surgery and the Mets will shop for mid-level veteran innings eater. Joe D. Says: The best case scenario for Matt Harvey in 2014, would be a return sometime around mid to late August. I can almost envision the excitement of his return – culminating in a dominating glimpse of the great season to come in 2015. The return of Harvey Day would electrify the fan base and be the perfect tonic going into the offseason and ushering in what we hope will be a run of success for the franchise beginning in 2015. Going into that offseason knowing that Harvey was back and healthy would eliminate the shadow that would be cast if he doesn’t return to make at least 2-3 starts. We need to see him back on the mound. It’s important for his teammates as well as the fans.
about 2 hours ago
Joel Sherman lauds the Boston Red Sox offense in a piece he did for the New York Post on Monday, suggesting when all is said and done it’s the Sox’ offense that might separate them from the rest of the post season playoff contender...
Joel Sherman lauds the Boston Red Sox offense in a piece he did for the New York Post on Monday, suggesting when all is said and done it’s the Sox’ offense that might separate them from the rest of the post season playoff contenders. According to Sherman that’s because strong pitching is a given and an almost automatic trait of every post season baseball team. Here’s how Sherman started his column: “The correlation between superb pitching and success remains inarguable.” He backs up that claim by adding that when it comes to earned run average, the top five teams in the major leagues this year are the National League playoff teams. And, the correlation between strong pitching and baseball success is not limited to the senior circuit. Five of the seven best American League teams also made the post season and the top eight all had winning records. Those numbers reinforce the Met’s effort to stockpile young quality pitching throughout their minor leagues. With the ace of the starting rotation, Matt Harvey, on the shelf next season, it’s also why the Mets must be extra cautious, extra selective in deciding to move young pitchers as trade pieces to fill position needs on other parts of the field. When it comes to ERA, in 2013 the Mets finished in the exact middle of the National League, ranking 8th among the fifteen teams. The National League ERA average was 3.73 with the Mets team mark at 3.78. For the most part, the Mets starting rotation fared well against the league average this summer  - a hopeful sign for our future. Of course, Harvey was off the charts with an ERA of just 2.27. But, Zack Wheeler (3.42), Dillon Gee (3.62) and Jon Niese (3.71) all finished beneath the league average mark. Those numbers are likely magnified a tad with Wheeler pitching in his rookie season; Gee getting off to a horrid start; and Niese working through early season injury issues. Actually, in his small sample of five starts Jenrry Mejia had a sparkling 2.30 ERA, almost matching Harvey. Carlos Torres, filling the fifth rotation spot down the stretch, also finished up with a respectable 3.44 mark. This too bodes well for the Met pitching profile moving forward. Even more encouraging were the starting pitching ERA totals, post all-star. The performance of the starting rotation during the second half was a big factor in the Mets managing to pretty much play .500 baseball throughout that stretch. Those impressive ERA numbers helped the five primary Met starters compile a 17 win 15 loss post all-star record. The chart to the right shows the ERA of the first place Atlanta Braves over the same period of time. In terms of earned run average, the Mets starting rotation matched up well with the Division Champs even though the Braves starters went 24-15 over that stretch. That speaks to the point Sherman was making. Once you have the elite pitching as measured by ERA, then your hitting numbers start to make a difference allowing one elite team to move beyond the others. One point of reference has to be the condition of the Met bullpen. Even though the pen pitched well during stretches, the overall quality of relief work was substandard. That’s especially the case when you consider that Bobby Parnell led the team in ERA at 2.16 and LaTroy Hawkins turned in a remarkable 2.93 ERA, 2.37 after the all-star game. The Mets long relievers and their bridges to get from the seventh inning to the eighth and the eighth inning to the ninth need attention. The Mets first order of business in getting to the post season and Sherman’s opening premise point the path. I’m optimistic, that’s were the Met rebuild has been focused. The Mets should be cautious about changing course by trading their best natural resource, their young starting pitchers. That means the Mets should be thinking strongly about using free agency as a strategy of upgrading the roster. International free agents are particularly appealing, probably riskier, but with a bigger upside should
about 3 hours ago
Another member of the 1979 team – and another guy I had to look up.He sent back this card in 24 days. The post @dtwohig’s Autographed Baseball Cards #51: Andy Hassler appeared first on The Mets Police.Related posts:@dtwohig...
Another member of the 1979 team – and another guy I had to look up.He sent back this card in 24 days. The post @dtwohig’s Autographed Baseball Cards #51: Andy Hassler appeared first on The Mets Police.Related posts:@dtwohig’s Autographed Baseball Cards #27: Gene Clines@dtwohig’s Autographed Baseball Cards #3: Rick Anderson@dtwohig’s Autographed Baseball Cards #8: Kevin Bass
about 4 hours ago
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — On a night when he was hit by a pitch twice, Shane Victorino delivered the biggest hit of all. View full post on Yahoo Sports – MLB – New York Mets News
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — On a night when he was hit by a pitch twice, Shane Victorino delivered the biggest hit of all. View full post on Yahoo Sports – MLB – New York Mets News
about 4 hours ago
It’s obvious that Jose Dariel Abreu, the 26 year old Cuban phenom, is at or near the top of many a team’s wish list this offseason. The frontrunners for the slugger have been reported as the Giants, Red Sox, White Sox, and Ra...
It’s obvious that Jose Dariel Abreu, the 26 year old Cuban phenom, is at or near the top of many a team’s wish list this offseason. The frontrunners for the slugger have been reported as the Giants, Red Sox, White Sox, and Rangers. It has also been reported that the Mets have shown somewhat of an interest in Abreu, with his innate ability to hit the ball far impressing them the most. That said, it is unlikely that Abreu lands with the Mets, so it does not seem unreasonable to explore the rest of the free agent options at first base. And why wouldn’t you want to explore, when your organizational options are Ike Davis, Lucas Duda, and Josh Satin. Yes, each one of them has shown some bright spots, but none have shown signs of longterm consistency. Let’s look at three other available options. Mike Napoli: Napoli is having one of the best seasons of his career, recording 38 doubles, 129 hits, and 79 runs scored (all career highs). A natural catcher, he did not play a field position other than first base in 2013. Napoli is arguably the best hitting first baseman on the market, let alone hitters on the market in general. He is one of only 10 players to hit at least 20 home runs in each of the seasons spanning 2008-2013. Napoli’s 92 RBI in 2013 rank only behind Robinson Cano among free agents. And the good news is that the Mets have been tossed around as possible suitors for the 31-year old, along with the Twins and the Rockies. I don’t have a problem with Napoli, and I would definitely consider him as a potential starting first baseman for the Mets. Corey Hart: Probably the next best option is Corey Hart, although he has expressed an interest in returning to Milwaukee. Even though Hart did not make it into a game this year (he had surgery on both knees), he has always been a reliable power and RBI source throughout his 10 year career. Hart is also a doubles machine; only once has he not recorded at least 20 two-baggers in a season. He has always been an above-par defender, and the only real cons are that in recent years, his steals have declined and the strikeouts have increased. Contract-wise, Hart has never made over $10 million, but he has said that he would take a pay cut to return to the Brewers. Could Hart be a realistic option for the Mets? Absolutely. I think he could slide in nicely in the cleanup or number five spot in the order, without giving fans any worries on defense. James Loney: Perhaps another strong candidate for 2014 Mets starting first baseman is current Ray, James Loney. The 30-year old is having a solid year in 2013, coming off a disappointing 2012 campaign split between the Dodgers and Red Sox. Loney signed with Tampa Bay this past December, and has since solidified himself as the starting first baseman, playing in 158 games. Meanwhile, he belted 13 home runs and recorded 75 RBI to the tune of a batting average one tick short of .300. After hitting .331 in his rookie season, Loney has since returned to his consistent form, and is back at a high level. Defensively, ESPN recently wrote that he’s been above average as a first baseman every season of his career according to DRS. Since his first full season in 2008, Loney has recorded more good fielding plays — as defined by Baseball Info Solutions — than any other first baseman except Mark Teixeira (400 versus 398). He could project to be a low cost, high reward player and would be a nice option for the Mets at first base. Well, there you have it. Three first baseman, three options. There are obviously other choices (such as Adam Lind and Kendrys Morales) but these are in my mind the top three. They also feel like the most realistic. So, if the Mets do indeed choose to look outside the organization for a first baseman, who do you have them signing?
about 4 hours ago
There's no doubt that shortstop was one of the Mets' worst positions in the 2013 season. While Omar Quintanilla played significantly more for the Mets than Ruben Tejada did this year, the latter was one of the worst hitters in baseball w...
There's no doubt that shortstop was one of the Mets' worst positions in the 2013 season. While Omar Quintanilla played significantly more for the Mets than Ruben Tejada did this year, the latter was one of the worst hitters in baseball when he played. With a .202/.259/.260 slash line and non-elite, possibly below average, defense, Tejada had one of the worst years at the position among everyone in the big leagues. To top things off, his season ended early when he broke his leg, an injury from which he's likely to recover by spring training but might still set him back a bit for next season. But as a Super Two, he's set for his first year of arbitration, and MLB Trade Rumors estimates he'll earn $1 million in 2014 as a result. Even though he's spent parts of four seasons in the big leagues, Tejada will turn just 24 year old later this month. And between 2011 and 2012, he hit a much more respectable .287/.345/.345 with the Mets. Sandy Alderson has made it pretty clear that the Mets need to upgrade at shortstop, but it's hard to imagine they would let a young player who had even moderate success in MLB walk for nothing. It won't be much of a surprise if the Mets include Tejada in a trade package, either before or after the non-tender deadline on December 2, but if he's still with the organization by then, the Mets should keep him. Poll If you were Sandy Alderson, would you tender Ruben Teajada a contract for 2014? Yes No 9 votes | Results
about 5 hours ago
A lot of things can happen in 14 years. Children are born, people die, presidents are elected, and fads come and go. (Remember the Macarena?) But I can’t believe it was 14 years ago today that one of the most overlooked moments in ...
A lot of things can happen in 14 years. Children are born, people die, presidents are elected, and fads come and go. (Remember the Macarena?) But I can’t believe it was 14 years ago today that one of the most overlooked moments in Mets history took place. Yes, today is the 14th anniversary of when  Todd “The Tank” Pratt went boom to lead the Mets past the Arizona Diamondbacks in the 1999 NLDS. I remember waking up just in time to see Todd Pratt, the Mets back-up catcher who was subbing for the injured Mike Piazza, take Diamondbacks closer Matt Mantai’s fastball over the centerfield wall. I was working for the heavy metal band, Shango at the time, and I had gotten home at around 6:00 AM from an overnight gig. I generally don’t sleep into the afternoon, but I was so tired from the night before and I missed the first nine innings of the game. I turned on the television while still being barely conscious to hear Chris Berman utter (more like scream) that now famous play by play: Oh… That’s hit well to centerfield… Finley goes back… BACK! BACK!!!!! (long pause) IT’S OVER!!! I remember watching Diamondbacks centerfielder, Steve Finley make what looked to be a leaping grab of the ball, but I saw the look of despair in his eyes and when he bowed his head in shame. I was totally awake (hung-over, but awake) and screaming at the top of my lungs! Your browser does not support iframes. Yes the Mets would be eliminated by the insidious Atlanta Braves in the NLCS, but if it was not for Todd Pratt – a man who just a scant years before was out of baseball and working at a Dominos Pizza franchise – the Mets may not of gotten that far. So what are your memories of that incredible Mets moment? We at MMO wish Todd Pratt all the best in his battle with head and neck cancer which he revealed in August. So far so good, for the former Met catcher… After surgery to remove the tumors, his cancer is now in remission and he says he feels good and doctors tell him he’s healthy. And with that said….. HERE COMES THE INFAMY!!!!!! Mets alumni celebrating a birthday today include: Utility man from the ’98 season, Jim Tatum is 46 (1967). In his lone season with the Mets, Tatum played every position except for shortstop, second base and pitcher! One third of “Generation K” Bill Pulsipher is 40 (1973). Oh what could have been! Starting pitcher from the ’06 season, Alay Soler is 34 (1979). Soler was the one of the few Cuban defectors the Mets signed in the past decade. But unlike an El Duque or a Livan Hernandez, Alay never lived up to the hype. He only pitched in eight games for the Mets, posting a record of 2-3 with a 6.00 ERA. Reserve outfielder from the ’11 season, Jason Pridie is 30 (1983). Pridie played in 101 games for the Mets that season, batting a paltry .231 with 4 homers and 20 RBIs. Other notables include: The  Oakland Athletics claimed both reserve outfielder Matt Watson and utility infielder Marco Scutaro of the New York Mets on waivers on October 9, 2003. As of this past season Scutaro was still an active player with the Giants, makes you wish the Mets never put him through waivers huh? Mo Vaughn nearly choked on his third helping of Dominos Pizza when he saw Pratt hit that homerun!!!!
about 6 hours ago
Meet the Mets Ken Davidoff writes that the Mets should have their eyes on the Biogenesis free agents this winter, particularly shortstop Jhonny Peralta. Matt Meyers of ESPN New York makes the case why the Mets should go after the Tige...
Meet the Mets Ken Davidoff writes that the Mets should have their eyes on the Biogenesis free agents this winter, particularly shortstop Jhonny Peralta. Matt Meyers of ESPN New York makes the case why the Mets should go after the Tigers' shortstop. Scott Boras says that Matt Harvey will have his Tommy John surgery within the next few weeks. Johan Santana has resumed throwing and he's aiming to be ready for spring training. Yesterday At AA Rob Castellano gave us a preview of the Mets' Arizona Fall League contingent. Should the Mets tender or non-tender Justin Turner this winter? Jeff Paternostro wrote about Binghamton pitcher Erik Goeddel. Around the Playoffs The Tigers defeated the A's 8-6 on Tuesday evening, forcing a game five and sending the series back to Oakland on Thursday. Here's the Rays and Red Sox box score for game four. Adam Wainwright will face off against Gerrit Cole in the decisive 5th game of the Cardinals and Pirates series tonight. Around the Majors The Braves decided to boycott Chipper Jones' ceremonial first pitch because he didn't pick them to win the series. They don't like to consider themselves the Party Police, but they are. Kendrys Morales will turn down the Mariners' qualifying offer and look for a longer deal on the free agent market this winter. Bronson Arroyo hasn't had any extension talks with the Reds and he doesn't expect the team to give him a qualifying offer. Grant Brisbee looked at the ten best compensation draft picks. Former Met Joe McEwing looks to have a future as a big league manager. Well, his views on the bunt and on infield shifts certainly seem to be by the book as they fit right into the archaic big league manager mold. If you read an article or find a link that you think would be a great addition to a future edition of Mets Morning News, please forward it to our tips email address tips@grission.com and we'll try to add it in.
about 6 hours ago
Sometimes, reality can be such a damn bitch… I read Joel Sherman’s interview with Hal Steinbrenner, owner of the Yankees, in which he discusses the decision to get their payroll under $189 million. What really stood out at me...
Sometimes, reality can be such a damn bitch… I read Joel Sherman’s interview with Hal Steinbrenner, owner of the Yankees, in which he discusses the decision to get their payroll under $189 million. What really stood out at me was his response to whether this was a soft goal or a mandate. “It is something to shoot for, but not at the expense of having a championship-caliber team,” Steinbrenner said. “It is not. It never has been and never will be. It has always been my contention you don’t need a $230 million payroll to field a championship-level team. We are going to get to under $189 million at some point. That is the goal: We believe you can win a championship at $189 million payroll because plenty of teams have.” Sherman deduces that even at $189 million — as long as Alex Rodriguez remains suspended next year — there will be about $80 million for the Yankees to spend this offseason. That’s enough he says, to keep Robinson Cano and add Japanese phenom Masahiro Tanaka, all-star catcher Brian McCann and a left side of the infield insurance policy such as Jhonny Peralta or Stephen Drew — and maybe even retain Curtis Granderson or Hiroki Kuroda, too. Meanwhile back at Flushing, we’re quibbling over re-signing Daisuke Matsuzaka or splurging on Bronson Arroyo with our meager $20-25 million. Nauseating, to say the least… For those of you who had your eye’s set on first baseman Kendrys Morales, forget about it. Mariners GM Jack Zduriencik told reporters that the team will definitely make a qualifying offer to the 30-year old switch-hitter. Jon Heyman of CBS Sports adds that Morales will most certainly reject that approximate $14 million dollar offer in search of a multi-year deal on the free agent market. Morales hit 23 home runs this season and led the Mariners in hits (167), doubles (34), RBI (80), batting average (.277), extra base hits (57), batting average with runners in scoring position (.312) and game winning RBI (15). He is represented by Scott Boras. I got an email yesterday which asked me what my gut feeling was on who will be the Opening Day first baseman for the Mets next season. Seriously, guys and gals, you need to send me more difficult questions, this one’s way too easy. The Mets first baseman next season will be none other than Lucas Duda – and you can put that one in the books. He’s a front office darling and they will look past his .233 batting average and point to his .353 on-base. That’s over 100 points worth of walks which reminds me of one of the best Keith-isms of the 2013 season. It’s the bottom of the eighth, two outs and runners on first and third. The Mets are down by one run and Lucas Duda comes up with a chance to break the game open for the Amazins. Instead, he draws a walk to load the bases. But before Mike Baxter pops up to end the inning, Hernandez says, “Another clutch walk by Lucas Duda… Sigh…”
about 7 hours ago