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You can watch “League of Denial,” the PBS Frontline documentary about concussions and the NFL here.
You can watch “League of Denial,” the PBS Frontline documentary about concussions and the NFL here.
about 1 hour ago
Joe Girardi rumors! Leaks from the A-Rod case! The Yankees have only the most exciting news right now. [0:42] Will Joe Girardi move on to the Cubs? [2:35] If Girardi goes, who would you want them to replace him with? Who wouldn't you wa...
Joe Girardi rumors! Leaks from the A-Rod case! The Yankees have only the most exciting news right now. [0:42] Will Joe Girardi move on to the Cubs? [2:35] If Girardi goes, who would you want them to replace him with? Who wouldn't you want? [11:09] Why are the Cubs so interested in Girardi anyway? [13:25] A-Rod chaos [17:13] On possible A-Rod suspensions [21:49] Steinbrenner/Cano negotiations [25:27] Playoff rooting interests [27:10] Yankee/Mitre of the Week. Yeah, still a thing! Related: Great job @jamieoliver and Food Revolution Day! Enjoying my @thejuicepressny in support. #frd2013 @Jmacjmacnyc pic.twitter.com/QCWFWt8Ka6 — Mark Teixeira (@teixeiramark25) May 17, 2013 [34:08] Send the Trop to the sun with Ichiro Podcast link (Length: 37:18) iTunes link RSS feed Sound off in the comments if you have any questions you'd like us to answer for next time, or if you have any feedback on the podcast! Send your tweets to the Tweetbag by tweeting @pinstripebible. Follow @pinstripebibleFollow @SBNationMLB
about 1 hour ago
More baseball news to brighten your day as teams continue to make managerial changes, and some have even begun signing their players and sure up their team for 2014. Los Angeles Angels The Angels have fired bench coach Rob Piccilo and ...
More baseball news to brighten your day as teams continue to make managerial changes, and some have even begun signing their players and sure up their team for 2014. Los Angeles Angels The Angels have fired bench coach Rob Piccilo and hitting coach Jim Eppard, while retaining general manager Jerry DiPoto and manager Mike Sciosca. Owner Arte Moreno decided the best course of action along with his GM and manager, so it seems that they essentially let him fire everyone in order to save their jobs. Houston AstrosThe Astros have hired Cardinal minor league pitching instructor Brent Strom as their new pitching coach. Houston had already made several changes to the coaching staff, but plan to keep Bo Porter as the manager. Toronto Blue JaysThe Blue Jays have fired hitting coach Chad Mottola and first base coach Dwayne Murphy. After such a disappointing season when there was so much expected of them, it isn't surprising to see someone get the axe. Chicago Cubs The Cubs have wasted no time sitting around during the playoffs. They signed Ryan Sweeney to a two-year $3.5 million. He will get $1.5 million per year with the inclusion of a $2.5 million option for a third year or a $500,000 buyout. The deal could lock him up through his age-31 season. Arizona Diamondbacks Arizona Diamondbacks starting catcher Miguel Montero had surgery on his left index finger to clean up an infection. While it doesn't sound serious, he also missed time last spring with an infection in his thumb. Seattle Mariners The Mariners plan to extend Kendrys Morales a qualifying offer, but it is very likely that he will decline in search of a long term deal elsewhere. He had his second above-average offensive season since returning from his broken ankle injury that kept him out of action in 2011. While the Yankees offense could absolutely use a bat like his, they don't have much of a place to play him. Mark Teixeira will be back and the DH will likely remain a rotation of Derek Jeter, Tex, and Alex Rodriguez. Philadelphia Phillies The Phillies have hired Larry Bowa as their new bench coach and Pete Mackanin as their new third base coach. Bow played for the Phillies from 1970-1981, then became a coach with the team from 1989-1996 before serving as manager from 2001-2004. He was a coach with the Yankees during the 2006 and 2007 seasons and followed Joe Torre to the Dodgers. Colorado RockiesThe Rockies have exercised their $11 million club option for Jorge De La Rosa and are now looking into extending the 32-year-old. Not that it was ever likely to happen, but that removed one possible free agent targets for the Yankees, who could have been attracted to the veteran lefty. More from Pinstriped Bible: How would Masahiro Tanaka fit into the Yankees 2014 plans? Can the Yankees reverse attendance issues in 2014? The 42 best GIFs of number 42, Mariano Rivera Notable Yankees free agent departures Magic Johnson's comments about Robinson Cano being investigated by MLB
about 2 hours ago
Yesterday, Hal Steinbrenner appeared on both Mike Francesa’s and Michael Kay’s radio shows to talk baseball. Though Steinbrenner had a lot to say, he didn’t spill too much we didn’t know. There was some budget tal...
Yesterday, Hal Steinbrenner appeared on both Mike Francesa’s and Michael Kay’s radio shows to talk baseball. Though Steinbrenner had a lot to say, he didn’t spill too much we didn’t know. There was some budget talk, some free agent talk, and legal questions.Interestingly, Steinbrenner did have something to say about the team’s go-to orthopedic surgeon Chris Ahmad. Ahmad, who’s currently facing a malpractice lawsuit following the discrepancies over Alex Rodriguez‘ hip last October, is also responsible for a number of complicated setbacks. Outside of Rodriguez’ hip, the doctor had a say in Mark Teixeira‘s wrist diagnosis, Derek Jeter‘s ankle injury, as well as Brett Gardner‘s elbow in 2012. Yes, there’s some correlation there, but Ahmad is considered one of the best orthopedic surgeons in the country, and he’s responsible for a number of other successful surgeries. Regardless, with all the setbacks this season, as well as the lawsuit, I thought Steinbrenner would either dodge questions, or perhaps even throw him under the bus.…
about 3 hours ago
Joel Sherman of the New York Post sat down with Hal Steinbrenner to discuss the Yankees and their future plans, specifically with the $189 million payroll goal looming overhead. Sherman came away from the conversation believing that the ...
Joel Sherman of the New York Post sat down with Hal Steinbrenner to discuss the Yankees and their future plans, specifically with the $189 million payroll goal looming overhead. Sherman came away from the conversation believing that the Yankees "certainly believe they can squeeze into that Cano, Masahiro Tanaka, Brian McCann and a left side of the infield insurance policy such as Jhonny Peralta or Stephen Drew...", which would certainly make Yankees fans feel a little better about the teams' chances heading into next season. Whether those names were directly mentioned by Steinbrenner or assumed by Sherman isn't immediately clear, but putting that to paper sounds a lot more comforting than most of the fears surrounding the type of team the Yankees may field in 2014. On the subject of Robinson Cano's next contract, Steinbrenner admitted that no player is worth signing at any cost. He believes that both sides would like for Cano to remain in pinstripes while acknowledging that it is a business, of course. If both sides have the same goal and the Yankees do not insult him with their offer and Cano does not get an offer from another team that he cannot refuse, it seems likely that the two sides can come to some sort of agreement that would bring the Yankees' best player back for another season and likely the rest of his career. With Alex Rodriguez in the middle of suing seemingly everyone while he stands before an arbitrator to have his 211-game suspension reduced, the Yankees have to assume, until they know otherwise, that they will have to pay him what he is owed next season. You can bet that they are hoping that they hear sooner than later about what his final punishment will be so that they can attempt to allocate the available funds into a player to help them next season. As of now, they have to sit and wait before they can begin to figure out how much of the money owed to Rodriguez they will have to work with. Steinbrenner also touched on the matter of the failures at the minor league level, saying that Brian Cashman was working to figure out if it was the fault of personnel or the fault of the process. The process can be changed if the personnel is retained, but the other option would involve making changes, likely in the form of firing one or both of Damon Oppenheimer and Mark Newman. He expected a final recommendation on the matter in the next 2-3 weeks. When it comes to the doubt that he will spend the money necessary to build a contender, Steinbrenner cited the fact that he authorized more than $400 million to be spent to acquire the services of CC Sabathia, Mark Teixeira, and A.J. Burnett after the 2008 season. Hal admits that if Cashman presented a plan for next year that met the goal of $189 million but fell short of the goal of fielding a championship contender, he would abandon the former for the sake of the latter. There is a lot of money to be saved ($75-$100 million, according to Sherman's article) if the team does get under the luxury tax limit for next season to reset their repeat offender penalties, so it may all just be words that they'd abandon those savings for the sake of making the playoffs. However, maybe there is some part of the Steinbrenners that refuses to let the Yankee legacy be altered in the name of pinching pennies. That remains to be seen, but right now, Hal is saying all the right things to give Yankees fans a shred of hope for next season. More from Pinstriped Bible: Follow @pinstripebibleFollow @SBNationMLB How would Masahiro Tanaka fit into the Yankees 2014 plans? Can the Yankees reverse attendance issues in 2014? The 42 best GIFs of number 42, Mariano Rivera MLB hopes to get Alex Rodriguez's lawsuit thrown out of court Magic Johnson's comments about Robinson Cano being investigated by MLB
about 3 hours ago
David Bryne writes about New York City: I moved to New York in the mid 1970s because it was a center of cultural ferment – especially in the visual arts (my dream trajectory, until I made a detour), though there was a musical draw, too, ...
David Bryne writes about New York City: I moved to New York in the mid 1970s because it was a center of cultural ferment – especially in the visual arts (my dream trajectory, until I made a detour), though there was a musical draw, too, even before the downtown scene exploded. New York was legendary. It was where things happened, on the east coast, anyway. One knew in advance that life in New York would not be easy, but there were cheap rents in cold-water lofts without heat, and the excitement of being here made up for those hardships. I didn’t move to New York to make a fortune. Survival, at that time, and at my age then, was enough. Hardship was the price one paid for being in the thick of it. As one gets a little older, those hardships aren’t so romantic – they’re just hard. The trade-off begins to look like a real pain in the ass if one has been here for years and years and is barely eking out a living. The idea of making an ongoing creative life – whether as a writer, an artist, a filmmaker or a musician – is difficult unless one gets a foothold on the ladder, as I was lucky enough to do. I say “lucky” because I have no illusions that talent is enough; there are plenty of talented folks out there who never get the break they deserve. Some folks believe that hardship breeds artistic creativity. I don’t buy it. One can put up with poverty for a while when one is young, but it will inevitably wear a person down. I don’t romanticize the bad old days. I find the drop in crime over the last couple of decades refreshing. Manhattan and Brooklyn, those vibrant playgrounds, are way less scary than they were when I moved here. I have no illusions that there was a connection between that city on its knees and a flourishing of creativity; I don’t believe that crime, danger and poverty make for good art. That’s bullshit. But I also don’t believe that the drop in crime means the city has to be more exclusively for those who have money. Increases in the quality of life should be for all, not just a few. [Picture by Bags]
about 3 hours ago
From today's Daily News' cheesecake machinery: Why can't we all write like this?"A-Rod's a sure-fire Hall of Famer when it comes to the women. From Kate Hudson to Cameron Diaz, take a look back at some of the Yankee's leading ladies .....
From today's Daily News' cheesecake machinery: Why can't we all write like this?"A-Rod's a sure-fire Hall of Famer when it comes to the women. From Kate Hudson to Cameron Diaz, take a look back at some of the Yankee's leading ladies ... Alex Rodriguez has hit a home run with current flame Torrie Wilson! The blond beauty, a former WWE diva who has been dating the Yankees slugger since December 2011, showed off her incredible washboard abs as she topped off her tan in Miami during a carefree getaway with her all-star beau ..."
about 3 hours ago
Tyler Austin has not regularly played the infield since 2011. But in his Arizona Fall League debut last night, Austin started at first base, and he’s actually listed as an infielder on the Scottsdale roster. It’s not necessar...
Tyler Austin has not regularly played the infield since 2011. But in his Arizona Fall League debut last night, Austin started at first base, and he’s actually listed as an infielder on the Scottsdale roster. It’s not necessarily a mistake. Mark Newman emailed this morning to say Austin is going to play first base, third base and right field in Arizona this offseason. “Flexibility,” Newman explained. Fair enough, but a look through the Yankees minor league system shows the team is stockpiling options at third base. And a look at the bigger picture shows it’s happening as Alex Rodriguez’s future becomes remarkably uncertain, Dante Bichette continues to struggle, and no in-house option has emerged as a clear successor at the position. • Austin, who moved from the infield corners to right field in 2012, is now playing the infield again. He didn’t play a single game in the infield during the regular season, but now third base is back on the table. • Peter O’Brien, drafted last year as a catcher out of the University of Miami, shifted primarily to third base in the second half of this season. He’s going to play third base and catcher in the Fall League, but he’s caught only 12 times since June 21. He’d been exclusively a catcher before that. • Eric Jagielo, a third baseman from Notre Dame, was the Yankees top draft pick this year. Having recently focused their first-round picks on high-risk high school players, the Yankees changed that approach to add a fairly polished college third baseman. • Rob Segedin, who in 2012 moved primarily from third base to right field, moved back to third base this year. He played exclusively in the infield before being shutdown by hip surgery. • Ronnier Mustelier, who barely played third base in 2011 and played roughly a quarter of his games at third base in 2012, essentially split his time 50/50 between third base and the outfield this season. • Not a position change, but if we’re discussing third base, it’s certainly worth noting that a young Dominican player named Miguel Andujar had a very nice year as a third baseman in the Gulf Coast League this season. Some of these were natural additions and transformations — Segedin was on a roster full of outfielders this season, Mustelier also played on a team that occasionally had more need for an infielder, the Yankees have a history of testing catchers at the infield corners — but there is a noticeable increase in third base options within the organization. And it’s come at a time when third base is a real question moving forward. Associated Press photo The post Yankees building organizational options at third base appeared first on The LoHud Yankees Blog.
about 4 hours ago
Yankees managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner said in a pair of wide-ranging radio interviews on Tuesday that the Yankees hope to retain manager Joe Girardi and second baseman Robinson Cano, but indicated the club is not prepared to ...
Yankees managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner said in a pair of wide-ranging radio interviews on Tuesday that the Yankees hope to retain manager Joe Girardi and second baseman Robinson Cano, but indicated the club is not prepared to offer a 10-year contract to Cano.
about 4 hours ago
Over the span of May and June, Preston Claiborne had a 1.46 ERA, 3.39 FIP and opponents OPS'd a mere .554 against him. That great start to his season kept his numbers up as a league-average pitcher, however, the rest of the season was a ...
Over the span of May and June, Preston Claiborne had a 1.46 ERA, 3.39 FIP and opponents OPS'd a mere .554 against him. That great start to his season kept his numbers up as a league-average pitcher, however, the rest of the season was a different story. Between July and September, he had a 6.66 ERA, 6.38 FIP and opponents OPS'd .889 against him, so either hitters figured him out or something went wrong. It was probably a combination of the two. As the season went on, Claiborne lost velocity on all his pitches, other than his changeup. In the first half he average 93 mph, but in the second half he was down to 92.1 mph. That 0.9 mph difference is the biggest seen in a Yankees reliever, other than David Robertson, who lost 1.1 mph on his fastball and was shut down toward the end of the season due to shoulder fatigue. The only other Yankee to experience a similar decrease in velocity was Boone Logan, who eventually missed time due to an elbow injury. When Claiborne's velocity dropped, he lost the ability to get hitter to chase out of the zone. In the first half of the season, batters swung 37.9% of the time at pitches out of the strike zone. In the second half it fell to only 31%. With hitters swinging at less balls his contact rate on balls outside the zone plummeted, going from 75.7% to 58.2%. Normally, avoiding contact is a good thing, but getting hitters to swing at balls out of the strike zone will either lead to swinging strikes or weak contact. Now Claiborne was no longer able to fool hitters and everyone just laid off the stuff he was throwing outside the zone and waited on the pitches he was still throwing over the plate. Instead of weak contact, he was now getting a plethora of fly balls (33.7 FB% vs. 41.5 FB%) and, obviously, a lot more home runs (14.3 HR/FB% vs. 18.5 HR/FB%). After posting a 1.52 BB/9 in the first half, his 3.92 BB/9 in the second half couldn't support him anymore. As a result of his inability to get batters out, his fastball value fell from a slightly bad -0.49 fastball runs per 100 pitches to a legitimately bad -1.87. His slider was even worse, going from a positive value of 1.86 all the way down to -2.25. His change up was his only valuable pitch all year, though it still lost value in the second half, going from an outstanding 5.58 to a still good 2.18. It was pretty clear that he wasn't very effective anymore and the Yankees knew it. They sent him to the minors toward the end of the season and he pitched sparingly in September. In the end, he could have been tired. For the last two seasons he's generally pitched to the same pitches per inning rate (16.8 pitches per inning in 2013, 16.1 pitches per inning in 2012). In the first half of this season he pitched to an elevated rate of 17.23 pitches per inning, which is understandable since he's facing major league hitting. By the second half he was at a heightened 20.7 pitches per inning while only throwing one inning more. He might have pitched at the same rate over the season, but the heightened rate toward the end definitely didn't help him maintain his strength as the season wore on. Maybe that's a good thing; fatigue is a lot easier to combat than ineffectiveness. More from Pinstriped Bible: How would Masahiro Tanaka fit into the Yankees 2014 plans? Can the Yankees reverse attendance issues in 2014? The 42 best GIFs of number 42, Mariano Rivera Notable Yankees free agent departures Magic Johnson's comments about Robinson Cano being investigated by MLB
about 4 hours ago