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Microinteractions are often an overlooked UX element, yet they can be incredibly powerful. It can be the difference from engaging and delighting your user to turning them away from your web site. Crafting the right copy to use is just a ...
Microinteractions are often an overlooked UX element, yet they can be incredibly powerful. It can be the difference from engaging and delighting your user to turning them away from your web site. Crafting the right copy to use is just a small element. There are many factors that go into it including appropriate timing, how data influences the triggers you use, and how to convey feedback just to name a few. In this post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on microinteractions. Additionally, you can really jump in deep with Dan Saffer’s fullday workshop, Designing Microinteractions at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. Dan’s workshop covers everything you need to know to ensure you properly create, use, and monitor microinteractions. Here’s some reading on Microinteractions Feedback Illuminates the Rules – Dan Saffer Dan discusses designing with details Designing Intuitive Microinteractions – Jared M. Spool Jared talks about microinteractions and how the social interaction they play. Designing Microinteractions – An interview with Jared M. Spool and Dan Saffer Jared and Dan discuss what microinteractions are and how they play a social role. Here’s a taste of what Dan has been saying about microinteractions Designing Microinteractions – Dan Saffer Do you think about the ringer on your phone and the ability to turn it off? Dan Saffer uses this example to kick off his book Microinteractions. Silencing the ringer on your phone is a common feature. If that feature is clunky or hard to find it interferes with needing to silence it quickly, in a crowded movie theatre for example. These tiny interactions that surround the main functionality are integral to rounding out the entire experience. Special Price for the UI18 Conference By the way, if you decide to join us for UI18 in Boston, October 21-23, 2013, use the promotion code BLOG and get $200 off the full conference registration.
about 2 hours ago
Jeff Gothelf knows better than anyone the importance of validating product ideas and concepts early in the design process to ensure you’re on the right track. He also knows the value of using rapid prototyping techniques and how to focus...
Jeff Gothelf knows better than anyone the importance of validating product ideas and concepts early in the design process to ensure you’re on the right track. He also knows the value of using rapid prototyping techniques and how to focus your efforts on achieving a business outcome rather than building features. If you agree with these ideas and want  to learn how to escape product requirement hell using Lean UX, read on. In the below post, you’ll find some great free articles and podcasts around Lean UX and Agile. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Jeff Gothelf’s workshop Escaping Product Requirement Hell Using Lean UX, You’ll learn to prioritize an endless backlog of ideas and features by talking about business outcomes earlier in your process — collaboratively — with your entire team. You will also get to see why you don’t have to build an entire product to understand if the idea has real value. Here’s some reading about Lean UX Why Lean UX? - Jeff Gothelf Jeff Gothelf lays out the rationale for why Lean UX is something new and why it’s important now Is There Any Meat on This Lean UX Thing?- Jared M. Spool Jared sets out to learn what Lean UX was all about. He talked to dozens of folks in all areas of the UX field and dug into what people mean when they talk about it. Designing with Remote Teams – Jeff Gothelf Jeff explains how to make designing work with remote teams. While the benefits of in-person collaboration and communication are clear, it doesn’t mean they can’t be achieved with remote colleagues. Cost Effective Approaches to Iteration in Agile UX – Jared M. Spool Jared delves into some ideas on how to make agile UX cost-effective. Agile Development Processes: An Interview with Jeff Patton – By Jared M. Spool and Joshua Porter In this interview Jeff Patton suggests that agile processes lead to happier people and reduced cycle times. He also posits that development teams engaged in Agile approaches generally work more collaboratively and see the software they are designing and building delivered at a higher frequency. Here’s a taste of what Jeff and others have been saying about Lean UX Jeff Gothelf – Lean UX: Escaping Product Requirement Hell Starting with an attitude that you’re testing a hypothesis which leads to a more open discussion. The main thing is, hypotheses, just like design, can change. Being flexible and iterative in your design process encourages an environment of collaboration. Jeff Gothelf – Lean UX: Integrating Design into Agile Using the Lean UX process, you’re constantly validating your designs, especially early in the process. This motivates the team to work towards the same end goal. Jeff Gothelf –  Understanding Lean UX The term Lean UX is bandied about quite a bit these days. Along with it, there seems to be some confusion as to whether this is just a buzzword, a new way of working, or simply a new description for what people in the user experience realm already do. Jeff Gothelf of The Ladders is a champion of Lean UX, so Jared Spool sat down with him to find out what Lean UX was all about. Anders Ramsay – Designing with Agile Anders says that you have to step back from specific Agile methods, such as Scrum and XP, and really look at the underlying ideas. Jeff Patton - Story Mapping for UX Practitioners: Tying Agile and UX Together Jeff talks about how story mapping is a way to build a model of user experiences. More than that, in the Agile context, it allows you to tactically plan for what should go into each release. It is a way to get everyone on the team thinking and talking about user experience. Special Price for the UI18 Conference By the way, if you decide to join us for UI18 in Boston, October 21-23, 2013, use the promotion code BLOGand get $200 off the full conference registration.
1 day ago
International Winter School on Machine Learning and Text Analytics [New Delhi, India] [Dec 15, 2013 - Dec 24, 2013]
International Winter School on Machine Learning and Text Analytics [New Delhi, India] [Dec 15, 2013 - Dec 24, 2013]
4 days ago
[ Transcript Available ] This podcast is Dan Klyn’s full presentation from UX Thursday Detroit. In considering your user’s experience with your design, keep in mind that there’s a difference between something looking good an...
[ Transcript Available ] This podcast is Dan Klyn’s full presentation from UX Thursday Detroit. In considering your user’s experience with your design, keep in mind that there’s a difference between something looking good and being good. But how do you determine good? How can you measure it? If, for example, you’re a print company building a digital presence, do you focus on retention or acquisition based on the shifting experience? Dan Klyn of The Understanding Group believes that it all starts with language. It’s easy to ask for something that already exists, but much harder to describe something that one might want or need. Inspired by the work of Richard Saul Wurman, Dan introduced a diagnostic tool to his team based on the idea of performance continuums. In using these continuums, you can remove “or” from the conversation. Instead of looking at design problems as a contradictory issue, you place your focus where it is appropriate on the continuum. In the example of the print company, Dan offers “We must continue to acquire new customers, yet we will service the ones that we have really well”. By seeing where you land on the continuum, you can get a sense if what you’re currently doing fits in with “good”. Dan shares his thoughts in this podcast of his presentation from UX Thursday Detroit. Recorded: June, 2013 [ Subscribe to our podcast via ?This link will launch the iTunes application.] [ Subscribe with other podcast applications.] Full Transcript. Dan Klyn: “Publishing Company” was accustomed to this. Paper and print and periodicals. What they were up against is digital. They had adopted digital a long, long time ago to make printing paper things more efficient, easier, better and that sort of thing. They did it in a timely fashion. They had no shortage of digital technology to make the paper happen. They didn’t embrace the medium of digital as a publishing medium and they needed to catch up. They felt like they were being forced, this is 2011, they’re being forced to transition to digital as a publishing medium. They hired a UX consulting company, a famous one from one of the coasts who we won’t name, to build them this bridge from print world, the print medium to the digital medium. Those people did a pretty OK job. They had a launch of this new digital version of what had been a print product. This print product had started being sort of, became a thing in the 1840s. They had a very long tradition of doing their business in print. They cut the ribbon on their new digital thing, and it was OK. It was OK. But what they’ve found out, there was a mix of people working on this thing and they had a blend of traditional publishing people and digital people. The digital people knew how to measure the use of the new thing. What they found was disquieting, to say the least. What they found was that when people first came to this new digital thing, this digital version of something they were accustomed to in print, they liked it pretty OK the first time. But the more that they used it, the less they liked it. The less engaged they got. That’s a big problem when your whole business model, at least the print version of the business model, is based on continuous repeated use. What they had on their hands was kind of like a turkey. At Thanksgiving, we all dream of eating that turkey. When we sit down after a year of being away from that turkey dinner, it’s great. But then, five, six days later, when you’re having your 16th turkey sandwich, you don’t like the turkey anymore. One of the people who worked at this company, we’ll call her Doris, was concerned about this pattern. She knew it was at odds with what the business needed to do to succeed. She was lying in bed at night with her husband, we will call him Rock, and she was sharing her concerns. Like, our company, this isn’t, we cut the cord, the people came, it was great, and now it’
5 days ago
International Conference on Language and Automata Theory and Applications [Madrid] [Mar 10, 2014 - Mar 14, 2014]
International Conference on Language and Automata Theory and Applications [Madrid] [Mar 10, 2014 - Mar 14, 2014]
5 days ago
Scott Berkun knows that exceptional designers aren’t just creative thinkers; they also work to understand the business and people around them. They are able to do this because they know how to invent ideas, develop them, and then persuad...
Scott Berkun knows that exceptional designers aren’t just creative thinkers; they also work to understand the business and people around them. They are able to do this because they know how to invent ideas, develop them, and then persuade others to get on board. Scott works hard at dispelling the myths about innovation and showing how to avoid common mistakes people make when doing creative work. If you want to be better at innovation and avoiding common mistakes read on. In the below post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on this topic. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Scott Berkun’s workshop Innovating on a Deadline, you’ll learn how to ask for what your team needs in order to do innovative work. You will also be shown how to develop a toolkit for both design work and creative work. On top of that you will be exposed to ideas about how to Invent ideas and develop them, overcome change resistance, and get comfortable making business and engineering decisions. Here’s some reading about innovation How to Innovate Right Now – Scott Berkun Scott Berkun discusses how anyone can innovate. Debunking the Myths of Innovation: An Interview with Scott Berkun - Christine Perfetti Christine Perfetti interviews Scott Berkun about the myths that can stifle the process of innovating Innovation is the New Black – Jared M. Spool Jared M. Spool discusses how innovation is now the new black, experience design is the fabric of new insight, and the work designers do is now the hot spot to be. Driving Innovation and Creativity through Customer Data – Christine Perfetti Christine Perfetti examines the competitive marketplace where designers are faced with the responsibility of creating new and innovative products that will recreate or capture their market and how do they go about proactively developing a creative and innovative design. Listen to what the experts say about innovation Scott Berkun – Innovating on a Deadline Everyone wants to be innovative, to be the next iPhone, or Google. Innovation in itself is a tricky proposition. There’s really no way to aim for it as a goal and it’s not something you can declare you’re going to achieve. Many companies and products have been innovative though, so there must be some way to do it. Jared M. Spool – SpoolCast: Innovation Beyond the Buzzword How many IBM or General Electric television ads do we need to see before we are groaning at the mention of the word “innovation”? It’s too late for me, personally. But that doesn’t mean real innovation is dead. Steve Jobs has been quoted saying Apple will innovate their way through tight times. This past week Apple announced record revenues for the past quarter on impressive sales of premium products that aren’t supposed to sell well during down times. How are they flourishing while their competition is not? Jared M. Spool - SpoolCast – Creating a Culture of Innovation with Scott Berkun “We’re struggling with how to measure how well we are innovating […] Are we innovating better this year than last year? How would I know?” If you work in a larger company and you haven’t heard a statement like this, you’re going to. Innovation has become such a buzzword, it’s nearly meaningless. But that doesn’t mean innovation itself is dead. Innovation is critical, but it’s not being defined for those folks challenged with implementing it. Innovation is hard work. Scott asks that we face facts here; to find big, new ideas that will change things for the better will never be easy. Special Price for the UI18 Conference By the way, if you decide to join us in Boston, October 21-23, 2013, use the promotion code BLOG and get $200 off the full conference registration.
6 days ago
You might have seen our PDF presentation from Monitorama that was published last week. Now, the video is available as well. You will be able to see more about tuning Elasticsearch’s configuration for logging. You’ll also lear...
You might have seen our PDF presentation from Monitorama that was published last week. Now, the video is available as well. You will be able to see more about tuning Elasticsearch’s configuration for logging. You’ll also learn what the various flavors of syslog are all about – and some tips for making rsyslog process hundreds of thousands of messages per second. And, of course, one can’t talk about centralizing logs without mentioning Kibana and Logstash. If you like using these tools, you might want to check out our Logsene, which will do the heavy lifting for you. If you like working with them, we’re hiring, too. For the occasion, Sematext is giving a 20% discount for all SPM applications. The discount code is MONEU2013.
6 days ago
When we’re planning a research study and get to the all-important consideration of the participants we need, we turn to Dana Chisnell.  No one spends more time thinking about how to get the right people involved with research than ...
When we’re planning a research study and get to the all-important consideration of the participants we need, we turn to Dana Chisnell.  No one spends more time thinking about how to get the right people involved with research than Dana.  In today’s reprint, Dana reveals the problems you can run into when you focus on demographics. For more of her thinking on recruiting research participants, and how that step of the study can provide bonus user research, join us on October 17, 2013 for her virtual seminar, Gaining Design Insights from Your Research Recruiting Process. Here’s an excerpt from the interview: What kinds of problems do teams run into if they focus on demographics? A few years ago, I did a study for AARP on the AARP.org web site. AARP is an organization for Americans over age 50. Among other things, AARP was interested in learning about how well their message boards, of which there were dozens active, worked for typical older adults. We conducted a usability test in three different locations with 20 participants in each location. In the first location, we recruited based on segments. We recruited 6 people in their 50s, 8 people in their 60s, 4 people in their 70s, and 2 in their 80s. AARP is about age, after all. We did not select for what people did online. When we got to the section of the test where we wanted people to do tasks with the message boards, we found that across the age brackets, most participants had not used message boards before and didn’t want to. Many simply refused to do the task. I asked them to do the tasks anyway. Guess what? The data wasn’t valuable. Message boards were not successful with these people because these people were not motivated to do the task. Read the article: Avoiding Demographics When Recruiting Participants – An Interview with Dana Chisnell What have you done to ensure you have the “right” folks in the test? Tell us about it below.
7 days ago
Giving critique is not an easy task. Doing it constructively and effectively without hurting someone’s feelings or coming off as cruel and inflexible is difficult. Being able to successfully critique and create design studios is so impor...
Giving critique is not an easy task. Doing it constructively and effectively without hurting someone’s feelings or coming off as cruel and inflexible is difficult. Being able to successfully critique and create design studios is so important we’ve dedicated many articles and podcasts to the topic, along with a full-day workshop. In this post, we’ve listed out some great free articles and podcasts on this topic. But you can really dive in deep at this year’s User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013. In Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry workshop Building Consensus in Critiques and Design Studios, you’ll learn how to organize energizing workshops that rally your teams to explore designs and achieve the best possible results. You’ll discover how to reach consensus, improve the conversations you have around design, and create open feedback loops your teams will actually use. Here’s some reading about design studios and critique Building a Cohesive Design Team – Jared M. Spool Jared discusses team characteristics that lead to successful designs. Goods, Bads, and Dailies: Lessons for Conducting Great Critiques – Jared M. Spool Jared explains how child magicians and Pixar Media have mastered critique and how you can incorporate this into your design process. Collaboration through the Design Studio: An Interview with Adam Connor and Aaron IrizarryJared M. Spool Jared interviews Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry on using a design studio as a process to improve team communication and achieve design goals. Design Studio Workshop: Adding up the Benefits – Jared M. Spool Jared explains how a design studio workshop can help your team work through various design challenges and the benefits these workshops bring to the team. What Goes into a Well-Done Critique – Jared M. Spool Receiving a critique is probably one of the hardest things we’ll do in our work. Giving one is equally as difficult. It’s hard to do well and easy to do poorly. As we’ve been working with teams over the last 20 years, we’ve accumulated an understanding of what goes into a successful critique. Here’s what we’ve found. Listen to what the experts say about design studios and critique Adam Connor – Design Studio: Building Consensus Early in Your Design Process Getting two people to agree on something is a difficult task in any aspect of life. Getting a whole team to agree on a design, where underlying feelings, ownership, and organizational hierarchy are involved, can be an even greater challenge. That’s not even counting the dreaded “swoop and poop” scenario. The trick is to get everyone involved early in the design process and a design studio is a perfect tool for just that. Adam Connor & Aaron Irizarry – Building Consensus in Critiques and Design Studios Adam Connor and Aaron Irizarry believe that critique is not just a design-centered skill that exists to make sure you’re doing things “right”. Instead, they see it as a living and breathing process of analysis and adjustment. Adam Connor & Aaron Irizarry – Collaboration through Design Studio and Critique Adam explains a design studio, and breaks it into three steps: sketch, present, and critique. Both Aaron and Adam believe that critique is often a misunderstood part of the process. Anyone can give feedback, or have a gut reaction, but critique is a more thoughtful and deliberate process. Critique is more analytical and needs to be measured against goals. Adam Connor & Aaron Irizarry – Discussing Design: The Art of Critique Critique is an integral part of the design process. Contrasting from feedback, critique is more focused and specific. Often, rather than a gut reaction, it is framed within the context of a dialogue. It is centered around arriving at an understanding. Special Price for the UI18 Conference By the way, if you decide to join us for the User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013, use the promo
7 days ago
Are you struggling with getting your design team organized on a project? Or do you want to make your kick-off meetings more effective and productive? Well we’re here to help you. In preparing for Kevin Hoffman’s full-day workshop, Leadi...
Are you struggling with getting your design team organized on a project? Or do you want to make your kick-off meetings more effective and productive? Well we’re here to help you. In preparing for Kevin Hoffman’s full-day workshop, Leading Super Productive Meetings at the UI18 Conference in Boston on October 21, we gathered up a slew of free resources to share with you on this topic. But these resources are just the tip of the iceberg. You’ll get the rest of the iceberg at Kevin’s workshop where he’ll provide helpful content, eye-opening hands-on exercises, and valuable one to one interactions. You’ll leave the workshop excited to schedule and conduct your next meeting. Go look at Kevin’s workshop description and you’ll see what we mean. Here’s some reading about meetings Perspectives over Power: Habits of Collaborative Team Meetings – Jared M. Spool Jared discusses what makes meetings more effective than others. What Good Teaching and Meetings Share – Kevin Hoffman Kevin shares four simple, easy-to-remember guidelines about how to convey information. Kick Ass Kick Off Meetings: Part 1 – Kevin Hoffman Kevin explains the advance work that should take place prior to the kickoff meeting, and the type of questions you should ask your stakeholders. Kick Ass Kickoff Meetings: Part 2 – Kevin Hoffman In part 2, Kevin dives deep into a plethora of exercises to use in kickoff meetings including a design studio activity. Listen to what the experts say about meetings Leading Super Productive Meetings – Kevin Hoffman Kevin Hoffman believes that the culture of an organization, not whether the team is remote or not, is the biggest factor in having productive meetings. Having a good set of principles really sets the tone for the collaborative process. Being able to quickly see options and constraints, and be able to collect feedback is instrumental to moving things forward. Designing Stellar Meetings – Kevin Hoffman An excerpt from Kevin’s UI17 talk, on six frameworks that help you design better meetings. Leading Productive Meetings – Kevin Hoffman Kevin has thought a lot about meetings. He views them as a design problem. There are dynamics that affect how successful a meeting can be. One thing Kevin has found successful is temporarily changing the organizational hierarchy. This allows everyone, leaders and their reports, to suggest ideas on an even plane. Inevitably this enhances the collaborative effort. Facilitating Project Kickoffs – Kevin Hoffman Kevin believes that kickoff meetings are the time to identify business strategy as well as company culture. It’s also important to assess any risks associated with the project in the kickoff meeting. Getting as many people involved at the onset of a project will help make the connection between project goals and the brand of the organization. It ensures everyone is on the same page. Special Price for the UI18 Conference By the way, if you decide to join us for the User Interface 18 Conference in Boston, October 21-23, 2013, use the promotion code BLOG and get $200 off the full conference registration.
8 days ago