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Really, it is a shame that most folks are not used to seeing cats stroll about on leashes, accompanying with grace and style the humans who serve them. It’s a shame because sometimes I have to remind people to pick their jaws up off the ...
Really, it is a shame that most folks are not used to seeing cats stroll about on leashes, accompanying with grace and style the humans who serve them. It’s a shame because sometimes I have to remind people to pick their jaws up off the ground when one of my leash-trained Abyssinians or Bengals trots past them during a shopping excursion. I breed Abyssinians as a hobby, exhibit them competitively in cat shows, and train them to perform various behaviors, otherwise known as “tricks” -- such as rolling over on command, jumping through hoops, and responding to hand or voice signals to jump, sit, or turn. Along with the Abys, I have two pet Bengals, and that combination enlivens my life and (depending on how I look at it) either keeps me young or contributes to the increasing ratio of white to brown hair on my head. With Racy Mooner, one of my beloved Abys. Photo by Jennifer Jenkins. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) My cats perform at trade shows and cat shows, and do television commercials, but ultimately, my cats are my pets, and each one of them is harness and leash trained when they are kittens. That training makes each cat much more portable, and often a very good shopping and travel partner. One time I took one of my Bengals, Callie, along when shopping for a new car. She perched upright on my shoulder for the entire outing. I believe I was able to negotiate a better deal because she unwaveringly stared down at the salesman, furrowing her feline brow at just the right times, making him uncomfortable enough that he decided to forgo any attempt to upsell me rust proofing, extended warranties, fabric coatings, or a 20-speaker sound system. Racy and I demonstrate her agility skills. Photo by Larry Johnson. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Never underestimate the power of a cat to be a most serious shopper, but I do suggest that some vigilance be exercised when a shopping trip is more feline focused than the new car showroom. I enjoy browsing in pet stores with my cats in tow, though it always reminds me of how much merchandise in these stores is marketed to the dog-owning public. All sorts of toys, bowls, leashes, and other canine devices crowd the aisles. Cats and their owners (who now outnumber dogs and their owners) get short shrift. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the snack section, as Abyssinian Twyla Mooner, Bengal Callie Mooner, and I found out during one visit to a huge pet supply warehouse. Racy Mooner's Facebook page."> Racy Mooner's Facebook page."> Guarding the dog food aisles against the canine riffraff demands vigilance . . . and a perch higher than the actual riffraff. Image courtesy Racy Mooner's Facebook page. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) We were greeted at the door with large overflowing bins containing a variety of biscuits and treats. Some of these bins contained various identifiable animal body parts sold as snack items. Large signs proclaimed “Hooves: 50 cents,” “Ears: 3 for $2.50,” and my favorite, “EXTRA LARGE SNOUTS!” I was intrigued by the offerings, and upon closer inspection I noticed
about 3 hours ago
Dog lovers can find themselves being teased (or even outright mocked) for treating their beloved pets like people. The next time one of your friends rolls their eyes and reminds you that "It's just a dog!" You might want to let that pers...
Dog lovers can find themselves being teased (or even outright mocked) for treating their beloved pets like people. The next time one of your friends rolls their eyes and reminds you that "It's just a dog!" You might want to let that person know about Gregory Berns, a professor of neuroeconomics at Emory University. Share this image Mason, one of Berns's test subjects, getting fitted for earmuffs that protect against the loud noises inside the fMRI. (@gberns Twitter feed) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Berns has trained 12 dogs to enter a functional magnetic resonance imaging machine, or fMRI, and lie still while their brain activity is mapped. This is remarkable enough in itself; it's notoriously difficult to get humans to lie still in MRI machines, which are small, cramped, and loud. But Berns has, for the first time, gotten neurological scans of fully awake, unrestrained dogs. Share this image A test subject named Honey waits patiently in a mockup of the fMRI machine used to train the dogs. (@gberns Twitter feed) function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) Writing on the opinion page of the New York Times over the weekend, Berns claimed that the results show that a dog's cognition and emotional responses are on a par with those of a human child. And maybe, he says, that means that it really is time for us to start thinking of dogs as people: Dogs, and probably many other animals (especially our closest primate relatives), seem to have emotions just like us. And this means we must reconsider their treatment as property. One alternative is a sort of limited personhood for animals that show neurobiological evidence of positive emotions. Many rescue groups already use the label of "guardian" to describe human caregivers, binding the human to his ward with an implicit responsibility to care for her. Failure to act as a good guardian runs the risk of having the dog placed elsewhere. But there are no laws that cover animals as wards, so the patchwork of rescue groups that operate under a guardianship model have little legal foundation to protect the animals' interest. The research is undeniably interesting: How often do you get to see a dog's brain at work? But there is some room for skepticism. At this point, Berns has only one study based on the 12 highly trained dogs. A sample that size offers more opportunities for questions rather than answers. The next step is to see what happens when Berns' colleagues start to pick his research apart like a pack of Chihuahuas fighting over a new sock monkey. But for anyone who's looked into a dog's face and felt warmed by the love and loyalty, there's at least the beginnings of some evidence that they're not just looking at you as a kibble dispenser. Via the New York Times Top photo: Dog Intelligence by Shutterstock.
about 3 hours ago
Brian of Brian’s Home has a UTI and is spending the day at the vet.  Please send him PURRS & PRAYERS, and leave a comment at his blog Brian’s Home.
Brian of Brian’s Home has a UTI and is spending the day at the vet.  Please send him PURRS & PRAYERS, and leave a comment at his blog Brian’s Home.
about 4 hours ago
AYLA: This is how it looks when TBT opens a precious can of stinky goodness. We instantly materialize from all parts of the house. I was asleep in the bedroom, Marley was nappin on the cat tree, an Iza was down in the basement!TBT laf...
AYLA: This is how it looks when TBT opens a precious can of stinky goodness. We instantly materialize from all parts of the house. I was asleep in the bedroom, Marley was nappin on the cat tree, an Iza was down in the basement!TBT laffs when scientists say the fastest thing in the universe is the speed of light. HE knows it is the speed of smell. And we all have differnt ways of waiting for the bowls to presented fer our consideration. Marley waits patiently, Iza is moved ta look fer previous crumbs. I go to the bedroom to wait fer MY bowl ta be delivered high up on the bathroom windersill where even Marley cant get at it...
about 4 hours ago
Florida ricordea, Ricordea floridea, are one of the staple corals that come from the oceans south of my back yard in the Florida Keys. They are a type of soft coral that occur in shallow waters on Caribbean reefs. Generally they are very...
Florida ricordea, Ricordea floridea, are one of the staple corals that come from the oceans south of my back yard in the Florida Keys. They are a type of soft coral that occur in shallow waters on Caribbean reefs. Generally they are very abundant and grow in large groupings of solid or mixed colors in the wild. Ricordea grow quickly and are easy to keep, making them very popular with new aquarists. Standard colors are orange, green, rose, and grey/blue, but there are many morphs that are a mix of any of these colors creating a true rainbow of colors. Ricordea from different areas like Puerto Rico or Haiti tend to have unique color morphs that do not appear in most areas of the Florida Keys. For one species of soft coral to have such a range of coloration depending on its location is truly amazing. I wonder if it would be possible to map out Florida ricordea according to their color patterns . . . more to see on Reef Gardener. A ricordea rock I created with rare color morphs.    Readers also viewed: Predatory Ricordea yuma comes to life in time lapse feeding video Jawbreaker mushroom anemone is the most incredible captive strain of Corallimorph Is it an egg? Is it an anemone? No, it’s a Discosoma sanctithomae mushroom anemone Incredible red Goniopora going strong after three years and multiple fragging Orange beaded Discosoma mushroom anemone is much nicer than a Ricordea impersonator Early imports of Vietnam mushroom anemones include a few showstopping morphs Preis Aquaristik and Ricordea Farm launch Coral-Energize food
about 6 hours ago
Film at 11, cute youtube video about a girl and her dog who travel from Wisconsin to Hollywood…. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqeyjwoemyM&feature=youtu.be EPISODE DESCRIPTION: Jahnna and her dog, Gizmo, move from Wisconsin to H...
Film at 11, cute youtube video about a girl and her dog who travel from Wisconsin to Hollywood…. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqeyjwoemyM&feature=youtu.be EPISODE DESCRIPTION: Jahnna and her dog, Gizmo, move from Wisconsin to Hollywood for her attempt at becoming a famous actress. The film crew documents the outlandish obstacles that take place when the two try to find a place to live. 2Fur1 2:1 – Gizmo, We’re not in WI anymore! 2Fur1 Web Series 2013! New episode every Tuesday! There’s a total of 11 episodes! TAGLINE: Will a Midwestern gal, a talking dog, and her film crew survive Hollywood? ABOUT: 2Fur1 is a comedy mockumentary where a film crew follows two best friends, a girl and her talking dog, to Hollywood. The star struck girl can’t catch her big break while her dog seems to be making his mark. The dog lands every acting audition and pays their bills even though he wants nothing to do with the industry. Will their friendship stay strong or will the dog end up stealing the show? OFFICIAL WEBSITE: http://www.2Fur1.com
about 6 hours ago
I want to say a huge raspberry to illness as its effecting far too many friends and me too. So many friends either ill or lost the fight and gone to the bridge. So yes a big fat raspberry to it all.. My friend Brian is i...
I want to say a huge raspberry to illness as its effecting far too many friends and me too. So many friends either ill or lost the fight and gone to the bridge. So yes a big fat raspberry to it all.. My friend Brian is ill and at the vets and has to stay at the vets today, he could use some purrs and woofs please. You can visit Here Love and hugs to Brian and all my friends.. GJ xxxOn a lighter note my CB calendar came a couple days ago and its pawsome. I love being able to see a blog friend every day. Thanks Paula for all your hard work.
about 6 hours ago
Click through to see the images. Long, long ago the landmass that we now call Australia was located near Earth's southern pole. Through tectonic activity the continent began moving to the north at a pace of just inches per year thoug...
Click through to see the images. Long, long ago the landmass that we now call Australia was located near Earth's southern pole. Through tectonic activity the continent began moving to the north at a pace of just inches per year though, and after many millions of years drifted to its current location. As this occurred, the northern parts of the continent gradually moved into the tropics, and coral reefs began to form along parts of its coastline and continental shelf around 25 million years ago.1 Since that time, changes in climate and sea level caused coral growth to wax and wane significantly, but around 600,000 years ago a large-scale reef structure began its development and eventually became today's Great Barrier Reef.1 The early version of the GBR also came and went to a large degree, but the current living structure has been growing for about 20,000 years now.2 So, there have been corals and reefs growing, dying back, and re-growing there for a very, very long time. Strung along Australia's Queensland coast, the reef is located in the Coral Sea, and is the largest structure on Earth made by living things. So large in fact, that it can seen from space, and is commonly considered to be one of the seven natural wonders of the world. It starts at a bit more than half-way up from the bottom of the east coast and extends up along the continent's horn to Papua New Guinea. That's roughly 1,500 miles, meaning if you laid it along the east coast of the U.S. it would reach from Miami to Boston. It also covers about 130,000 square miles of the seafloor.2 It's not one humongous and continuous coral reef though, as it's actually comprised of about 900 islands and almost 3,000 individual reefs.2 Copyright Dive the World (http://www.dive-the-world.com/). Used with permission. Around and amongst these islands and reefs live a great number of organisms, including approximately 1,500 species of bony fish and 130 species of cartilaginous fish, plus 30 species of marine mammal, 14 species of sea snake, 6 species of sea turtle, and an occasional salt water crocodile that makes a long swim out from the mainland.2 There are also about 600 species of stony and soft coral, 40 species of anemones, 100 species of jellyfish, 330 species of sea squirts, 400 species of bryozoans, 630 species of echinoderms, 1,300 species of crustaceans, 1,500 species of sponge, and as many as 5,000 species of mollusc.2 Plus, about 500 species of marine algae to finish off the list.2 Thus, the Great Barrier Reef is certainly a great place to do some diving. This is just an example of the coral cover in some areas. A tiny and unknown (to me) fish on a branch of Tubastraea micrantha. This was an odd scene for sure. A crinoid climbing up the body of a standing sea cucumber, Bohadschia graeffei. A pixy hawkfish, Cirrhitichthys oxycephalus, hanging out next to a sun coral, Tubastraea sp., and a sponge, Nara nematifera. It took a few years, but I finally accrued enough frequent flyer miles to get a ticket to the land down under, and I made the long trip to the far southwest over my winter break from school last December. I spent several days in Sydney to get a feel for the big city life there, and also spent a week in the ancient and magnificent rainforests around Cairns in the north, but the primary reason for going was obviously to dive on the reef. Unlike many other places where I've been diving around the world, you can't just walk in and swim to any part of the reef. Nor can you hop in a small boat for a brief ride. Instead, you need to get on a larger boat and take quite a trip out for the good stuff. So, I pulled out my credit card and booked a week-long excursion on the 122' Spirit of Freedom out of Cairns, which was one of the best decisions I've ever made. The Spirit of Freedom, and Christmas Eve on board with Trip Director Nick Leigh. After getting out to sea, the diving started and didn't stop for the week. There were 28 div
about 7 hours ago
about 8 hours ago
I recently made a huge cross-country move, through which my cats fared amazingly well (except when they didn't). This was a huge change for all of us, as even a crosstown move can be a big deal for cats. In order to make your move as smo...
I recently made a huge cross-country move, through which my cats fared amazingly well (except when they didn't). This was a huge change for all of us, as even a crosstown move can be a big deal for cats. In order to make your move as smooth as possible and minimize the chances of an escape, here are some things you should do before and during the move. Cat in a box of packing peanuts by Shutterstock"> Cat in a box of packing peanuts by Shutterstock"> Cat in a box of packing peanuts by Shutterstock function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) 1. When looking for a place, check it out from a feline point of view Are you next door to a fire station? Does your neighbor have a constantly barking dog? Do you smell cat urine in the yard or hallway? These things could stress your cats and lead to behavior problems. Do the windows have screens so your cats can’t escape or fall out? 2. Be honest about your cats If you try to sneak your cats into a no-pets-allowed apartment, you run the risk of being busted and either having to give up your cats or give up your home. Don’t chance it. If your landlord is doubtful about allowing your cats, sell yourself as a responsible cat caretaker. Provide veterinary references and ask your previous landlords to speak about your well-behaved kitties. Gray cat wearing collar by Shutterstock"> Gray cat wearing collar by Shutterstock"> Keep the information on your cat's collar tag and microchip current. Gray cat wearing collar by Shutterstock function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) 3. Update your cats’ tags and microchip information If your cats escape, make sure anyone who finds them will be able to get in touch with you. If your cats are microchipped, update your address and phone number with the chip registry. If they wear collars with tags, put your new phone number on their tags, too. 4. Pack your cats’ stuff last Packing is just as stressful for your cats as it is for you. The longer your cats can have their familiar toys, beds and furniture, the less anxious they'll be. Siouxsie sits on an end table in my old house. She dealt pretty calmly with the gradually disappearing belongings, but when I packed her heated bed, she turned to me for comfort. function changeWidth(obj) { if(parseInt($(obj).parent().width()) > parseInt($(obj).width())) { $(obj).parent().css({'width':$(obj).width()}); } if(parseInt($(obj).width()) 5. On moving day, put your cats in a safe room You don’t want your cats to escape as you’re moving out of your home, so put them and their carriers in an empty room or in the bathroom. Be sure they have their beds, a litter box and some water. Once everything is moved out, close the outside door before opening the door to their safe room and putting them in their carriers. 6. In your new home, reverse the process Before you start moving stuff in, put your cats in a room with a door that closes firmly. Once you’ve got everything inside and the furniture mostly set up, let them out to roam the house. Plug in a couple of pheromone diffusers to take the edge off their stress. Cat sitting on a mantel in an empty room by Shutterstock"> Cat sitting on a mantel in an empt
about 8 hours ago