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Over the weekend, Matt Smith wrapped his final day of production on Doctor Who, bringing his era to an end, possibly with that long-promised fall. While the character will be regenerating into Peter Capaldi, Smith’s transformation ...
Over the weekend, Matt Smith wrapped his final day of production on Doctor Who, bringing his era to an end, possibly with that long-promised fall. While the character will be regenerating into Peter Capaldi, Smith’s transformation will see him become Patrick Bateman, American Psycho. This isn’t for that in-development TV sequel but for a new stage production that reimagines Bret Easton Ellis’ original novel as a musical. I hear Huey Lewis and Phil Collins when I think of Patrick Bateman; I’m curious as to what this show will actually sound like. Keytars, drumpads and sax, maybe? The show’s director will be Rupert Goold while the book is by Robert Aguirre-Sacasa, alum of Archie and Marvel comics, Glee, the new Carrie movie and the rewritten version of the Spider-Man musical. By now I think I’m getting a pretty good idea of his tastes. I could probably buy him a good Christmas present at least. American Psycho is to open at London’s Alameida on December 3rd. If I can get tickets, I’ll be there. I won’t be sitting near the front, though, as it might get wet from fake blood flying around. Also in the cast will be Ben Aldridge, Charlie Anson, Jonathan Bailey, Katie Brayben, Cassandra Compton, Holly Dale Spencer, Susannah Fielding, Simon Gregor, Holly James, Lucie Jones, Tom Kay, Gillian Kirkpatrick, Eugene McCoy and Hugh Skinner. I’m calling it now: a Broadway run with Neil Patrick Harris. Surely that’s gold? Matt Smith To Star In Musical Version Of American Psycho
about 2 hours ago
This article was originally published at Philly Sports History by Johnny Goodtimes. Phillies slugger Chuck Klein The 1930 Phillies were probably the most fascinating team in MLB history. They hit .315 as a team, the 3rd highest total in ...
This article was originally published at Philly Sports History by Johnny Goodtimes. Phillies slugger Chuck Klein The 1930 Phillies were probably the most fascinating team in MLB history. They hit .315 as a team, the 3rd highest total in MLB history. (Interestingly, the Giants hit .319 that same year to set the record.) They had 1,783 hits that season, still the most in MLB history. The Phils had 5 regulars who batted over .300, including outfielders Chuck Klein and Lefty O’Doul, who both batted over .380. Klein had perhaps the greatest regular season in Phillies history, finishing with a line of .386-40-170, and a slugging percentage of .687 (Miguel Cabrera had a SLG% of .606 last year while winning the Triple Crown). And yet, these Sultans of Swat finished 52-102, 40 games out of first. You read that right. A team that batted .315 collectively finished 50 games UNDER .500. How is that possible? It’s possible because the 1930 Phillies had the worst pitching staff in the history of baseball. The only team you could even compare them to was my Little League team that finished 0-15 in 1984 (True story). For some perspective, think about how terrible Adam Eaton was in 2008, when he went 4-8 with a 5.80 ERA. And just think, the 1930 Phils had 11 pitchers with worse ERAs than Adam Eaton. Save $4 on the 1930 Phillies cap by clicking on it. A few years ago, a guy named Tom Ruane wrote a paper called “Modern Baseball’s Greatest Hitting Team”. The answer? The opponents of the 1930 Phillies. Try these stats on for size: Phillies’ opponents batted .346 that year (27 points higher than those record setting 1930 Giants), with 1994 hits (200 more than the record holders, the 1930 Phillies) and scored 1199 runs (Over 130 more than the record holders, the 1931 Yankees.) The ace of that staff was none other than Phil Collins. And you thought No Jacket Required was his worst work. (Rim Shot). The infamous Les Sweetland. Actually, Collins wasn’t the problem. He was an almost respectable 16-11 with a 4.78 ERA. Ray Benge came next, with a 5.70 ERA. Then came two record holders. Les Sweetland set a record that year that has never been broken, throwing for a 7.71 ERA, (the worst of all time among pitchers who qualify for ERA title). #2 for worst all time was his teammate Claude Willoughby, with a 7.59 ERA. It must have been like Mantle and Maris chasing the Babe’s home run title that year. And Hal Elliot just fell short of qualifying for an ERA title, throwing 117 innings. Otherwise he would be 2nd, with a 7.67 ERA. And so when people say they wish they could combine the 2008 Phils’ hitters with the 2011 Phils’ pitchers to make the perfect team, I argue that they’d be even better if you combined the 2011 Phils with the 1930 Phils. Heck, they’d win 130 games. If you wanna purchase the same cap worn by Klein and his teammates, click here. The link will automatically discount the hat by $4 or you can enter the promo code “1930Phils” in the future.
4 days ago
Poll created by jude111 — You may have a different favorite version, but I'm wondering which of these two most prefer, and whether it will be close or not. Personally I prefer the Phil Collins version (even if of course I prefer G...
Poll created by jude111 — You may have a different favorite version, but I'm wondering which of these two most prefer, and whether it will be close or not. Personally I prefer the Phil Collins version (even if of course I prefer Genesis before Gabriel left). (If this poll's been done before, I wasn't able to find it...)
4 days ago
Maybe it was her hypnotic eyebrows (which have their own Twitter page), her flawless skin, her love of bold lip colours, or a combination of the three which enticed Lancôme to snap up Lily Collins as a new rose (an English rose) to repre...
Maybe it was her hypnotic eyebrows (which have their own Twitter page), her flawless skin, her love of bold lip colours, or a combination of the three which enticed Lancôme to snap up Lily Collins as a new rose (an English rose) to represent their brand amongst their already blossoming English actress hall of fame, which already includes Emma Watson and Kate Winslet. The 24-year-old actress and daughter of 80s pop icon Phil Collins will be kicking off her brand ambassadorship in January with their spring makeup collection ‘Ballerine’. “With her charm, gracefulness, modernity and lively wit, Lily Collins is the perfect embodiment of femininity according to Lancôme,” stated Françoise Lehmann, general manager of Lancôme International. Credit: Courtesy of Lancôme The post Lily Collins for Lancôme appeared first on Red Carpet Fashion Awards.
5 days ago
Review by Neu!mann — I'm not entirely sold on the validity of a John Cale page here at ProgArchives, but this 1977collection has some killer music no matter how you define it. Three of the songwriter's mostrepresentative albums fro...
Review by Neu!mann — I'm not entirely sold on the validity of a John Cale page here at ProgArchives, but this 1977collection has some killer music no matter how you define it. Three of the songwriter's mostrepresentative albums from his mid-'70s creative peak were distilled (or gutted, if you prefer) into a rare five-star compilation album, without an ounce of fat or fluff.Maybe the music is Progressive in a more literal sense of the word. Most of the songs here begin in a more or less rational frame of mind, but progressively lose their already tenuous hold on anything resembling sanity. The album's title track, excerpted from the 1975 "Slow Dazzle" LP, is a good example: in less than four minutes it drags the listener through a netherworld of parrot sh!t; parrot spit; piss that missed the pot; poison souls; and the singer's urgent encouragement to "kill all you want; make sure, do it right..."We're a long way from the Heart of the Sunrise, in other words. And that's before the jaw-dropping dementia of "Leaving It Up To You", omitted from the 1975 album "Helen of Troy", possibly due more to Cale's delivery than his lyrical content. Or the nihilistic philosophy expressed in "Fear is a Man's Best Friend" and "Gun". Or the rape of Elvis Presley in the malevolent update of "Heartbreak Hotel", sung as if by an axe-murderer approaching an ecstasy of bloodlust.Given the extremities of subject and style, even the Prog-Related label might seem like a stretch. But you can see the connection in Cale's choice of session players: Phil Manzanera, Brian Eno, Phil Collins (back when the Genesis drummer still had musical aspirations), and ace guitarist Chris Spedding, the latter not really a Prog artiste but certainly among friends. There are far more comprehensive Cale samplers on the market, spanning a wider cross-section of his larger career. But there's a tighter focus in the limited range of this album. A great song selection, strong performances, and a scary/funny iconic cover photo make it an essential package of truly great hits, most of them below the belt.
5 days ago
opinion by MATTHEW M.F. MILLER It’s a bold statement that Yuck chose to open their sophomore album, Glow and Behold, with a vocal-free track given that this long-gestating project came to fruition without the original voice of the band. ...
opinion by MATTHEW M.F. MILLER It’s a bold statement that Yuck chose to open their sophomore album, Glow and Behold, with a vocal-free track given that this long-gestating project came to fruition without the original voice of the band. On the London-based group’s likable, 2011 self-titled debut album, singer/guitarist Daniel Blumberg’s vocals squawked appropriately low in the mix, sung through the same muffled distortion as the punk-lite wailing guitars. His casual yet snarling delivery, featured on the majority of the band’s songs, was a great fit for a group that modeled its sound after Dinosaur Jr., Sonic Youth, and The Strokes. Even the most earnest songs had an edge thanks to some good old-fashioned sonic grit. Since Blumberg’s departure in April 2013, fans have been eager to see where in the pantheon of singer-swaps Yuck would fall. Would band co-founder Max Bloom’s step-up to the full-time mic be as smooth as Genesis promoting Phil Collins from drummer to superstar, or would this be more akin to The Doors post Jim Morrison debacle? Glow and Behold’s opening track, “Sunrise In Maple Shade”, forces listeners to withhold judgment, albeit briefly, by essentially repeating the same measure of music over nearly three minutes of monotony. It’s an attempt both to distance your expectations of Yuck from this new iteration as well as to establish a complete change of course. Stylistically, the song is a far cry from the last time we heard from Yuck – its clean, plucky guitars are almost as shocking as the simple horns that punctuate the delicate, dreamy vibe. Second track “Out of Time” kicks in with a sunny, mid-tempo, 90s college rock vibe, and neither the pace nor the tone ever strays too far. The whole album feels like a duller version of the moody, lovelorn swoon bands like Travis and Snow Patrol made semi-famous at a time when sounding like Toad the Wet Sprocket was considered indie so long as you were from the U.K. Pretty much everything has changed and none of it for the better. Song length is a problem across the board. Taking two minutes of an idea and stretching it out across tunes that consistently clock in at around the four-minute mark shows a real lack of focus and voice. “Rebirth” starts off as a promising ode to Tears For Fears era pop, but the lyrics are dreck (“Hold me down in the sunlight to sacrifice myself. I don’t want your love, I want you”), and even patient listeners will be checking their iPhones to see how much playtime is left. The first single off Glow and Behold, “Middle Sea”, is a comparative highlight. Bloom brings a bit of life to the affair shouting, “I don’t want to live forever. I don’t want to live. I want you now.” It provides the album’s only break from meandering politeness to rock out and screech. For a few minutes it feels like the Yuck of old, but even the album’s most fun track grows tiresome fast once it’s apparent there are nine lines of lyrics stretched across a four-plus minute song. Yes, a few of the albums tracks, such as earworm “Lose My Breath” are catchy enough to find their way onto your favorite teen drama series this fall, but they make very little sense as part of the small yet sturdy Yuck catalogue. Nothing here approaches the bouncy punk of “The Wall” or the early R.E.M. garage rock of “Holing Out” from their debut. Despite losing only one member, this is an entirely different band. Truly, the only thing that hasn’t changed is the band’s name, which is probably the very first thing that should have been altered. Although now, the name is no longer a misnomer. If the Yuck of yore was the perfect soundtrack to a college hipster’s low-key summer kegger, the new Yuck begs to be the romantic soundtrack to your next autumnal walk in the park. Grab a latte and strap on your headphones, lovebirds – it’s about to get soft rock up in here. [C-] Read more articles like "Review: Yuck – Glow and Behold" on PMA - Pretty Much Amazing. Tags: Featured, Matthew M. F. Miller, Yuck
6 days ago
Lily Collins has a new job, as the face of the most recent and current Lancome campaign. Before her Lancome turn, Lily Collins wowed at Paris Fashion Week in a goth ensemble. Paper the Daily Mail writes: “The pretty young British a...
Lily Collins has a new job, as the face of the most recent and current Lancome campaign. Before her Lancome turn, Lily Collins wowed at Paris Fashion Week in a goth ensemble. Paper the Daily Mail writes: “The pretty young British actress, daughter of musician Phil Collins, first shot to fame in Oscar-winning movie The Blind Side, before she was cast in films including Abduction, Mirror, Mirror and Stuck In Love… Her latest offering is action adventure movie The Mortal Instruments: City Of Bones, in which she plays the lead character of Clary Fray, who begins to learn about her warrior background after her mother goes missing.” Lily Collins is stepping into some big shoes as she provides this year’s Lancome look, and the star has been preceded by Penelope Cruz, Kate Winslet, Julia Roberts and Emma Watson as Lancome cover girls. The star herself seems quite excited for the Lancome partnership, and she gushed in a release: “It’s an absolute honor and privilege to have been chosen to represent the Maison Lancôme. I have always admired the brand’s unique and distinctive appreciation for inner beauty and grace, elegance and utter radiance.” General Manager of Lancôme International Francoise Lehmann said of the choice to use Collins as a face for Lancome: “With her charm, gracefulness, modernity and lively wit, Lily Collins is the perfect embodiment of femininity according to Lancôme.” In the past, Lily has mused that she’d like to do both small and large projects of all sorts of scopes, explaining: “That’s what I want to do – balance fun big movies with gritty passion projects I love… I didn’t feel the pleasure in drinking or doing drugs. I wanted to remember the fun moments that I had with my friends and not wake up and go, ‘Um, I think I had fun?’ ” Lily Collins is officially a “brand ambassador” for Lancome, and dished that during Paris Fashion Week, she wore nail polish and mascara from the line. Lily Collins Is The New Face Of Lancome is a post from: The Inquisitr News
6 days ago
Cue the squealing; Lancome has just announced the lovely Lily Collins as their newest face! The actress, who recently starred in The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, will have her first go as Lancome's spokesperson in January for the b...
Cue the squealing; Lancome has just announced the lovely Lily Collins as their newest face! The actress, who recently starred in The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, will have her first go as Lancome's spokesperson in January for the brand's Spring 2014 line "French Ballerine." We love Lily for her envy-inducing brows and her impeccable red carpet looks, so we can't wait to see her in this new role. This is the first time Lily, who is the daughter of Phil Collins, has lent her stunning visage to a beauty brand.
6 days ago
Portland-based rapper Myke Bogan is making noise for his new visual “Here We Go,” but his movement extends further than that. Get to know more about the MC who draws comparisons to Kendrick and Big L. Standout: “Here We Go” ...
Portland-based rapper Myke Bogan is making noise for his new visual “Here We Go,” but his movement extends further than that. Get to know more about the MC who draws comparisons to Kendrick and Big L. Standout: “Here We Go” Also check out: “Skunk Nugs” And: “Uncle Elroys Couch” Name: Myke Bogan Age: 26 Hometown: Lancaster, CA currently residing in Portland, OR. This is where my whole movement is based. I grew up listening to: The Fugees, Biggie Smalls, Tupac, Phil Collins, Blink-182 and lately Young Statues from Philadelphia. I am also really into what Chance the Rapper has put out, that dude can spit! Most people don’t know I: Usually piss the bed if I’ve consumed a mass amount of whiskey even if it is in my bed. My style’s been compared to: Kendrick Lamar, Wiz Khalifa, Big L. My standout records and/or moments to date have been: One time after I rocked a show with Snoop Dogg a girl called me “the black Brad Pitt”. My goal in Hip-Hop is: To be heard by as many people as possible and to give people music that just makes a positive impact. I also want to achieve all the personal goals I have to break from the norm in hip-hop. I’m gonna be the next: Myke Bogan. To check out more of my music go to: Follow me on Twitter (@MykeBogan) and Tumblr. Follow XXL on Facebook
7 days ago
The American Top 40 shows from the 80s don’t wear very well, at least not with me. They’re badly padded and frequently contain stretches of songs even I don’t remember. But I’ll still listen to one now and then, b...
The American Top 40 shows from the 80s don’t wear very well, at least not with me. They’re badly padded and frequently contain stretches of songs even I don’t remember. But I’ll still listen to one now and then, because during the mid 80s, I was program director and morning guy on a Top 40 station and AT40 affiliate and it’s fun to recapture those days for a little while. And recently I’ve been listening to the show from September 21, 1985, which was a very 80s week indeed, with Madonna, Prince, Huey Lewis, Phil Collins, Wham, and Tina Turner all riding high. 38. “I’m Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down”/Paul Young. When this guy chose the right songs—as he did earlier in 1985 with his spectacular version of Hall and Oates’ “Every Time You Go Away” and would do in the early 90s with the Chi-Lites’ “Oh Girl”—he sounded great. Other times, he misfired. “I’m Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down” is an old R&B song by Ann Peebles, but I wondered both in 1985 and again the other day how come this record just isn’t better. 37. “Miami Vice Theme”/Jan Hammer. Synergy, everybody—this record debuted in the Top 40 the week before the second-season premiere of Miami Vice. 36. “No Lookin’ Back”/Michael McDonald, 27. “Shame”/Motels, and 26. “Every Step of the Way”/John Waite. Maybe it’s my obsession with the 70s talking—the way I have sought out every last obscure record from that decade, so I’m more familiar with them—but it always seems to me like the 80s countdowns are loaded with stuff that’s completely forgotten now. All told there are maybe a dozen songs out of this week’s Top 40 that still get significant airplay today and about as many I couldn’t hum a note of. 35. “Four in the Morning”/Night Ranger. Sweet mama Night Ranger sounds jive now—like the product of a focus group designed to sell records to teenagers. There might actually be real instruments on this, but it’s as phony as hair extensions. 34. “Life in One Day”/Howard Jones. Catchy enough, and introduced with a shoutout to AM Stereo 1490 WDBQ in Dubuque, Iowa. 28. “I Got You Babe”/UB40 and Chrissie Hynde. UB40 is what you’d get if you drugged Pee Wee Herman and taught him to sing over inept reggae noodling that needs to be speeded up by maybe a third. Few other successful bands in history suck so definitively. In the second hour, Casey does a feature on the artist who went the longest between Top 10 hits—Dickie Goodman, over 19 years between “The Flying Saucer” in 1955 and “Mr. Jaws” in 1974. Casey often delivers his lines at a slow tempo, as if he’s conscious of the need to fill time, but on this bit he repeats the same information three different times. These shows don’t need to be four hours long as much as they need to be three-and-a-half. One of the Long Distance Dedications this week is to deceased Japanese singer Kyu Sakamoto from a fan, which gives Casey an excuse to play the 1963 #1 hit “Sukiyaki,” regardless of whether that’s a good idea. Another LDD is from an unemployed 17-year-old mother of twins to her 19-year-old husband, who left her “last week.” If I’d just been dumped into such a dire situation, writing to Casey Kasem would be fairly far down my list of priorities. The song she chose was one I don’t remember, Rick Springfield’s “Don’t Walk Away.” 22. “There Must Be an Angel”/Eurythmics. Probably the best thing they ever did. I find myself with little to say about the warhorses in the countdown after this point, like “Summer of ’69,” “Freeway of Love,” “Saving All My Love for You,” and “Take on Me,” and nothing to say ab
10 days ago