Phil Silvers

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SAM SNEADAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"The Colonel Breaks Par"BCnU!
SAM SNEADAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"The Colonel Breaks Par"BCnU!
about 5 hours ago
KAY KENDALL[with Sergeant Ernie Bilko]AS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"Bilko Presents Kay Kendall"BCnU!
KAY KENDALL[with Sergeant Ernie Bilko]AS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"Bilko Presents Kay Kendall"BCnU!
2 days ago
EVERETT CROSBYAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"Sergeant Bilko Presents Bing Crosby"O'BSERVATION:Everett was Der Bingle's brother and his manager.BCnU!
EVERETT CROSBYAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"Sergeant Bilko Presents Bing Crosby"O'BSERVATION:Everett was Der Bingle's brother and his manager.BCnU!
8 days ago
THE CROSBYSGARY, LINDSAY, PHILIP, and DENNISAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"The Bilkos And The Crosbys"BCnU!
THE CROSBYSGARY, LINDSAY, PHILIP, and DENNISAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"The Bilkos And The Crosbys"BCnU!
8 days ago
Review by KC Carlson It’s interesting (at least to me) that the Warner Archive chose to release Help! It’s the Hair Bear Bunch! and Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels at about the same time earlier this year. The former was the series w...
Review by KC Carlson It’s interesting (at least to me) that the Warner Archive chose to release Help! It’s the Hair Bear Bunch! and Captain Caveman and the Teen Angels at about the same time earlier this year. The former was the series where I decided to stop watching Saturday morning cartoons (except for the occasional Bugs Bunny episode, when I was actually awake that early), and the latter (along with Laugh-A-Lympics) was the show that brought me back (at least part-time). Both shows were produced by the legendary Hanna-Barbera studio, which ruled Saturday morning TV in those days. Help! It’s the Hair Bear Bunch! debuted in September 1971 and aired 16 original episodes. Its Saturday morning run ended January 8, 1972 — canceled in the middle of its second season. (All 16 episodes are in this two-DVD set.) The fall it debuted was the year I entered high school, which was my primary reason for leaving cartoons behind (at least temporarily). You know, the whole leaving childish things aside thing… Little did I know… Haven’t I Seen You Somewhere Before? There was a lot that was very familiar about Help! It’s the Hair Bear Bunch! if you were a cartoon fan. The majority of voice actors were HB regulars, including Daws Butler as fast-talking, scheming Hair Bear, using his best Phil Silvers “Bilko” voice (see also Hokey Wolf); Paul Winchell (Dick Dastardly, Fleegle) as the very confused Bubi Bear; John Stephenson (Dr. Quest, Mr. Slate) as the constantly aggravated head zoo director Mr. Eustace P. Peevly; and Joe E. Ross (“Oooh! Oooh!” Officer Gunther Toody on both Car 54, Where Are You? and Wait Till Your Father Gets Home) as his inept assistant Lionel J. Botch. (Botch. Geddit? Jeepers…) This show was Ross’ first HB assignment, but several more would follow, including Hong Kong Phooey. Besides the familiar voices, there are a lot of previous HB themes in this show, including animals controlling their “keepers” (Yogi Bear, Wally Gator, Magilla Gorilla, Breezly and Sneezly), animal “gangs” (Top Cat, Banana Splits, Cattanooga Cats), annoying and/or idiotic humans (too many to list, including all the bad guys in Scooby-Doo), and characters that only ran from left to right (or right to left). (Yes, I am messing with you.) Plus, the show had the first HB theme song that I actively hated. And it sure doesn’t help, hearing it at least a dozen times each on these two DVDs. (Thank goodness for “Next Chapter” remote buttons.) It’s certainly no Flintstones, Jetsons, or Josie and the Pussycats theme. HB fans of a certain age are huge fans of this show, and I think that’s great. But after all the early HB classics, and after “mature” shows like Jonny Quest, Space Ghost, and The Herculoids (and even Secret Squirrel and Atom Ant — which really needs to be coming soon from Warner Archive), having to jump back into what conservative parent groups of the era thought was best for their youngsters was just too much to (hair) bear. At least for me. Captain CAAAAAVEMAAAAAAANNNN! What brought me back to Saturday morning was two things. First was Mel Blanc yelling his head off with the above catchphrase. Second was the still-unmatched concept of teaming HB’s classic characters (Huck, Yogi, Quick Draw), some of the more modern concepts, including (kid-friendly) heroes (Dynomutt, Hong Kong Phooey, Speed Buggy (?!), and Scooby-Doo), and finally a group of HB bad guys called the Really Rottens. The last included the familiar-seeming Dread Baron and his dog Mumbly, the Dalton brothers (Dinky, Dirty and Dastardly) from old Huckleberry Hound and Quick Draw McGraw cartoons, and the Creeplys, a monstrous family based on both The Gruesomes (from The Flintstones) and Mr. & Mrs. J. Evil Scientist (from Snooper and Blabber and Snagglepuss cartoons). All three teams competed in Olympic-like competitions — actually, the show was based on ABC’s Battle of the Network Stars, but who remembers that! — with each episode set i
19 days ago
PAUL DRAYLNAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"Bilko Retires From Gambling"SYNOPSIS:Colonel Hall hired master card manipulator Paul Draylin to go undercover as a soldier and beat Sgt. Bilko so badly at cards that Bilko would never play ag...
PAUL DRAYLNAS SEEN IN:'The Phil Silvers Show'"Bilko Retires From Gambling"SYNOPSIS:Colonel Hall hired master card manipulator Paul Draylin to go undercover as a soldier and beat Sgt. Bilko so badly at cards that Bilko would never play again. Draylin figured it would be better if the worst player in the camp should beat him and that was Sgt. Rizzik. Getting beat by Rizzik was so devestating that it left Bilko a broken shell of a man, and that had a debilitating ripple effect on the rest of the camp. BCnU!
about 1 month ago
Produced and Directed by Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera.Credits: Animation – Lew Marshall; Layout – Paul Sommer; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Art Goble; Production Supervision – Howar...
Produced and Directed by Bill Hanna and Joe Barbera.Credits: Animation – Lew Marshall; Layout – Paul Sommer; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Art Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.Voice Cast: Huckleberry Hound, Instructor, Herald (off-screen), Blond Knight, Moustached Knight, Grey-Haired Knight – Daws Butler; Narrator, King Arthur, Dragon, Bearded Knight, Brown-Haired Knight, One-Card Knight – Don Messick.Music: Jack Shaindlin, Geordie Hormel, Bill Loose/John Seely, Spencer Moore.Episode: Huckleberry Hound Show No. K-043First Aired: week of April 24, 1961.Plot: Huck earns his membership in the Knights of the Round Table. Huckleberry Hound is a pleasant guy so his cartoons are pleasant, even when there’s nothing uproariously funny going on. There are a few good moments in “Knight School,” but it’s not a laugh-out-loud fest. Still, the cartoon’s hard to dislike because Huck’s personable enough to carry it off. “Knight School” consists of an introduction and three vignettes. The last one is a reworking of the Huck vs Dragon idea in the first season cartoon “Dragon-Slayer Huck,” which, frankly, was more enjoyable than this little film. It involved a contest between Huck and a funny fire-breathing dragon that sold dragon souvenirs. Here, the dialogue-less dragon burns Huck a couple of times before his flame gets put out (an almost predictable conclusion) and he runs away. The humour in this scene is fairly typical of Huck—it depends mainly on Warren Foster giving him funny lines for his commentary to the audience about what’s happening in the cartoon. “He’d make a ginger-peachy cigarette lighter,” Huck tells us and “You don’t frighten me, Mr. Dragon with all your smart-alecky flamin’ and roarin’.” But there’s also talk for the sake of talk. “I think I’d better get out of here,” Huck says. As he has turned around and is running away, we can already see he’s “getting out of here.” It’s dialogue for dialogue’s sake. The first vignette comes after a nice establishing shot of a Dick Thomas background (with transparent clouds) and a narrator telling us young men from far and wide desired to be knights of the Round Table. Huck corrects the narrator. He doesn’t want to become one. “I was drafted,” he says. I didn’t realise there was a draft at the time the cartoon was made that would be the subject of humour. Huck goes to the Knight School that’s the title of the cartoon. “Hmm. Knight school in the daytime. It’s gettin’ confusin’ already,” he inevitably puns to us. “Private” Huck gets crushed a couple of times and comments to the camera. Foster pulls out the old “Just call me Shorty” line. The instructor has Daws Butler’s Phil Silvers voice except he adds kind of an English tinge to it at times. The vignette ends with a scene a fight we don’t see (it’s off-stage) that’s indicated by sounds and a shaking camera. But there is animation; Lew Marshall has the English sergeant turn to the camera and give us a goofy look. Huck wins the fight. Turns out a fat guy fell on him and by the time he got up, the rest had of the would-be knights beat each other up. So the King knights Huck and leaves him with a bump on the head. “You ever think about usin’ an aluminum sword, sir?” Huck asks. The second vignette is the best. The knights cut cards and the high-card holder must slay the fire-breathing dragon of Shropshire. “Thanks, your majesty,” says the nervous Huck, “But I never play cards.” Huck draws a three. But it turns out to be the high card. Three knights draw twos. One draws a one. Not an ace. A one. The card has a one on it. The third vignette has the dragon non-fight and then the wind-up scene has another card-cutting for the honour of doing battle with an ogre in Chettingham. Huck is ready this time. “You know, you cain’t have a card lower than a zero,” he tells us as he pulls out a card with a zero on it. Ah, but this time, the low number goes. “Shucks. No wonder they use a r
about 1 month ago
Spy Vibe wishes Julie Newmar a purrrrfect Birthday! Best remembered for her role as the Catwoman in Batman (1966), Ms. Newmar turns 80 today. Like Diana Rigg in The Avengers, Newmar was able to present a sophisticated, brilliant, funny, ...
Spy Vibe wishes Julie Newmar a purrrrfect Birthday! Best remembered for her role as the Catwoman in Batman (1966), Ms. Newmar turns 80 today. Like Diana Rigg in The Avengers, Newmar was able to present a sophisticated, brilliant, funny, and strong role-model for girls in the sexist climate of cold war America. "Tell me I'm beautiful, it's nothing. Tell me I'm intellectual - I know it. Tell me I'm funny and it's the greatest compliment in the world anyone could give me.""It was so wonderful being on Batman (1966) because you could be nasty and mean, and in the '50s women could never--unless you were some 'B' picture actress--be mean, bad, and nasty. It was so satisfying; I can't tell you how satisfying it was."Newmar began her career as a dancer/actress, appearing in many film and stage productions that included The Band Wagon, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Silk Stockings, Li'l Abner, The Marriage-Go-Round, and Damn Yankees. She even played the role of "Dancer-Assassin" in Slaves of Babylon (1953). Julie Newmar's television appearances began in 1957 on the Phil Silvers Show and she has continued to work on the small screen throughout the decades in memorable programs like Route 66, The Twilight Zone, My Living Doll, Batman, Beverly Hillbillies, F Troop, The Monkees, Star Trek, Get Smart, It Takes a Thief, McCloud, Bewitched, Buck Rogers, and According to Jim. Beloved as the iconic Catwoman, Newmar appeared in the Batman reunion biopic, Return to the Batcave (2003) and in Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2010). Her famous catsuit, which she modified to place the belt across the hips, is now in the Smithsonian collection. Actress, dancer, entrepreneur, writer, and gardner, Julie Newmar remains an inspiration (and heartthrob) to many. I hope Ms. Newmar enjoys her day with loved ones and fun projects! More info, media clips, images, and news at the Julie Newmar website here. Wonderful early images below in the style of Chaplin (and G Masina/La Strada):[LAST DAY TO ENTER]: Still need to enter Spy Vibe's summer contest to win vintage prizes? The deadline has been extended to August 16th. Details here. Get ready to meet MIKI ZERO, a Japanese fashion model and spy from 1965! I've written a novel inspired by Spy Vibe. More info at my website here.
about 1 month ago
Doris Day, Phil Silvers, Nancy Walker, and Eddie Foy, Jr. sing "High Hopes" from the movie 'Lucky Me'. The song, with music by Sammy Fain and lyrics by Paul Francis Webster, is an ode to unemployed actor/singers wanting to get a break on...
Doris Day, Phil Silvers, Nancy Walker, and Eddie Foy, Jr. sing "High Hopes" from the movie 'Lucky Me'. The song, with music by Sammy Fain and lyrics by Paul Francis Webster, is an ode to unemployed actor/singers wanting to get a break on Broadway. The movie, billed as the 'Ultra-New Look in Musicals', the first one filmed in Cinemascope! It is a classic story of talented yet unemployed actors looking to be discovered. They meet up with a talented Broadway composer, looking for someone fresh and new for his latest work. Intrigue, love, fights, jealousy, and musical numbers ensue. I hope you love "High Hopes" as much as I did when I came across it recently on The Movie Channel. Doris, Silvers, and Walker were all some of the top names in musical comedy at the time. And Foy, the son of vaudeville great Eddie Foy, was the star on both stage and screen, making this a powerful cast. It was directed by Jack Donohue, who had recently directed several episodes of 'The Frank Sinatra Show' television series. He went on to work on many variety television shows, working with stars like Red Skelton, George Gobel, Dean Martin, Mickey Rooney, Don Knotts, Lucille Ball, Paul Lynde and Dinah Shore. He went on to helm episodes of 'The Brady Bunch', 'Here's Lucy', 'The Odd Couple', and 'Chico and the Man'.
about 1 month ago
Las Vegas is known as the “Entertainment Capital of the World,” so naturally a lot of great movies have been shot here. Since MGM Resorts International properties make up a huge part of the bright lights and backdrop of Sin City, they’ve...
Las Vegas is known as the “Entertainment Capital of the World,” so naturally a lot of great movies have been shot here. Since MGM Resorts International properties make up a huge part of the bright lights and backdrop of Sin City, they’ve attracted the eyes of Hollywood’s directors for years. Here’s a list of 10 of the most popular films showcasing these resorts – including one that’s premiering this fall! How many have you seen? “Pure Country” When it was released: 1992. Who was in it: George Strait, Lesley Ann Warren, Isabel Glasser and Kyle Chandler. What it’s about: Dusty Chandler (Strait) is a country music superstar whose concerts have taken on a rock vibe, so he stops performing. In order to get back to his roots, he heads to the small farm town where he grew up. There Dusty finds wisdom from his grandmother and romance. He returns to the stage in Las Vegas during National Finals Rodeo with an appearance that’s true to his country spirit and wins him the heart of his love. Hotel it was filmed at: The Mirage. Watch for: At the end of the movie, you’ll see real concert footage from a taping of Strait’s “I Cross My Heart” tour at The Mirage. It includes a touching presentation of his hit single by that same name. “Sgt. Bilko” When it was released: 1996. Who was in it: Steve Martin, Dan Aykroid and Phil Hartman. What it’s about: A remake of the hit TV series “The Phil Silvers Show,” this movie features Master Sergeant Ernest Bilko (Martin) in charge of the motor pool at an Army base. He operates numerous scams while handling the military vehicles, but finds he must truly put his skills at deception to the test when an old enemy turns up to inspect the records – and steal his fiancée. Hotel it was filmed at: The Mirage. Watch for: The scenes when Bilko takes his platoon to Las Vegas are hilarious. They drive down the Strip in a tank (with “Viva Las Vegas” playing in the background) and arrive at the main entrance of The Mirage. You’ll also see Martin at a craps table on the resort’s casino floor with a sign for the former Siegfried & Roy Theatre behind him. “The Great White Hype” When it was released: 1996. Who was in it: Samuel L. Jackson, Jeff Goldblum, Peter Berg, Damon Wayans, Jon Lovitz, Cheech Marin and Jamie Foxx. What it’s about: A play on the title of the 1970 movie “The Great White Hope,” this film is a satire about racism in boxing. Unscrupulous promoter Rev. Sultan (Jackson) believes some of his fights are failing financially because audiences don’t want to see two black boxers contest each other, so he goes on the hunt for a white contender (Berg) to clash with the undefeated heavyweight champ. Hotel it was filmed at: MGM Grand. Watch for: At the beginning of the movie, James “The Grim Reaper” Roper (Wayans) is seen fighting his first opponent in the MGM Grand Garden Arena. Regular visitors to the MGM Grand will also enjoy the shot of the old lion’s head entrance, which was removed and replaced with the massive bronze sculpture of a lion in 1998. "Vegas Vacation" (©Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.) “Vegas Vacation” When it was released: 1997. Who was in it: Chevy Chase, Beverly D’Angelo, Ethan Embry, Marisol Nichols and Randy Quaid. What it’s about: The fourth and final film in the National Lampoon’s “Vacation” series, it centers around the all-American Griswold family during a disaster-filled trip to Las Vegas. The bumbling head of the family, Clark (Chase), takes his wife Ellen (D’Angelo), goofball cousin Eddie (Quaid) and teen children to Sin City only to struggle to keep everyone (and his wallet!) in sight. Hotels it was filmed at: The Mirage and MGM Grand. Watch for: At the beginning of the movie, you’ll see Clark leafing through a Vegas brochure with The Mirage featured on its front cover. When they reach the Entertainment Capital of the World, the Griswolds win tickets to see world-famous German illusionists Siegfried & Roy at the resort. During the show, Clark is even turned into a tiger. The next evening,
2 months ago