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At an altitude of nearly 14,000 ft., the observatories atop of Mauna Kea, Hawaii give a crystal clear view of space through the night sky. The contrast of satellites and lasers against the daunting view of space really makes us feel conn...
At an altitude of nearly 14,000 ft., the observatories atop of Mauna Kea, Hawaii give a crystal clear view of space through the night sky. The contrast of satellites and lasers against the daunting view of space really makes us feel connected to something bigger. This was a recent Vimeo staff pick and definitely worth a watch, especially in full screen view. [more]
about 2 hours ago
about 3 hours ago
The intel airship crew sets up for a glow as dusk envelopes the fiesta. A visual tour de force as flame meets the deepening blue sky, drawing in spectators each evening to play witness to this awesome display of light & sound. Photo by: ...
The intel airship crew sets up for a glow as dusk envelopes the fiesta. A visual tour de force as flame meets the deepening blue sky, drawing in spectators each evening to play witness to this awesome display of light & sound. Photo by: Jeremy Wade Shockley @jeremywadeshockley
about 3 hours ago
Skyline. A single balloon lifts up towards the earth’s atmosphere, the Sandia Mountains still visible on the distant horizon, propane burners light up the aircraft as it lifts skyward. Photo by: Jeremy Wade Shockley @jeremywadeshoc...
Skyline. A single balloon lifts up towards the earth’s atmosphere, the Sandia Mountains still visible on the distant horizon, propane burners light up the aircraft as it lifts skyward. Photo by: Jeremy Wade Shockley @jeremywadeshockley
about 3 hours ago
If you’ve ever had to work your way through a busy airport with your gear, you know that an ordinary camera bag just isn’t going to cut it. Making sure everything is safely packed, moving through security, getting on and off ...
If you’ve ever had to work your way through a busy airport with your gear, you know that an ordinary camera bag just isn’t going to cut it. Making sure everything is safely packed, moving through security, getting on and off your plane, working your way through yet another airport– it’s a challenge. Think Tank Photo addressed the challenge head-on not too long ago, when they introduced a new line of Airport Backpacks. The line includes (from biggest to smallest) the Airport Accelerator, Airport Commuter, and Airport Essentials, all of which meet U.S. and international carry-on standards. I’ve been putting the Commuter through its paces for the better part of a year, and– as someone who had previously never owned a gear bag designed specifically around air travel– I’m really impressed. As with all things Think Tank, the construction is impeccable. Heavy-duty zippers and stitching, comfortably padded straps and handles, as well as all of the pockets and compartments I’ve come to expect from Think Tank. While lots of pockets and extra dividers aren’t exactly innovative, more and more of Think Tank’s newer bags are also being designed with dedicated pockets for tablets or laptops. The Airport Backpack series is designed to hold both. The exterior-access pockets are also right where they do the most good, providing quick access to travel essentials like i.d., credentials, passports, boarding passes, and other necessities. A large side pocket is perfect for a bottle of water or a paperback book. All of that great exterior access doesn’t do you much good, though, if the interior doesn’t do its job well. Fortunately, the gear section of this bag is pretty remarkable. The two things I noticed while packing it for the first time were how much it holds, and how deep it is.  Without any re-reconfiguring of the dividers, I packed three bodies, five lenses, two speedlights, a set of Pocket Wizards, and all of the memory cards, cords, batteries, chargers, gels, film, pens, business cards, m&m’s, and accessories I needed. And there was room for more. Other features include a locking security cable, removable waist belt, and tripod attachment straps. To be honest, I was a little disappointed by the tripod attachment set-up. The exterior side pocket holds two of the legs, and a set of included straps secure the tripod to the side of the bag.  Unfortunately, I don’t really feel all that secure attaching my tripod to this bag, but that might be my tripod’s fault. If it was light-weight carbon fiber or more of a travel size I might feel differently. I was initially a little concerned about carrying the fully loaded weight of this bag on my back, but the padding and straps work well to distribute the weight evenly. I’d probably still prefer a rolling case for longer trips, bigger airports, and larger gear loads, but the Airport Commuter is built around the concept of making traveling with your gear easier. Mission accomplished. Last observation– Don’t let the word “airport” in the name fool you. I’ve been using this bag as one of my main, everyday location bags far more than I’ve been using it for travel. Mode of transportation notwithstanding, this is one of the best bags I’ve come across for packing a sizable amount of gear, plus laptop, iPad, and other essentials. Post originally from: Digital Photography Tips. Check out our more Photography Tips at Photography Tips for Beginners, Portrait Photography Tips and Wedding Photography Tips. A Review of the ThinkTank Airport Commuter Backpack The post A Review of the ThinkTank Airport Commuter Backpack by Jeff Guyer appeared first on Digital Photography School.
about 3 hours ago
This week's column by Ctein This week's title alludes to a column I wrote three and a half years ago, called "I Quit." Sometimes quitting is a long process. To put it another way, "The darkroom is dead. Long live the darkroom...
This week's column by Ctein This week's title alludes to a column I wrote three and a half years ago, called "I Quit." Sometimes quitting is a long process. To put it another way, "The darkroom is dead. Long live the darkroom... somewhere else!" As I planned, the monstrous TOP Blowout Dye Transfer Sale was the last big hurrah. It wasn't my last darkroom task; I had a couple of commitments to clear off. Minor stuff compared to the sale, but still, it was work I'd promised to clients. I wound up with just barely enough large sheets of large dye transfer paper to honor those commitments. I was cutting it a bit fine, but it worked out. So, what were the very last things I did with my darkroom? The next-to-last was an obligation to complete the dye transfer edition of Ken Jarecke's "Face of War" photograph. About ten years back, Pierce [Photojournalist and printer Bill Pierce, long known to one and all by his last name only —Ed.] put Ken in touch with me to inquire if I'd be willing to print that photo for him. I was honored by the request, but I had to think on it. I wasn't sure I could do it. The photo's one of the all-time great war photographs, and I would argue the greatest to come out of Iraq War I. (Yeah, I know, that's practically trolling for everyone to trot out their candidate for "greatest" but it's how I feel, so have at it. No accounting for taste, especially mine [g].) But it was also well-suppressed in the United States at the time. The major news services, distributors, and papers refused to run it on the grounds that doing so could "hurt the war effort." Yes, an oligopoly can exercise pretty effective censorship. OK, so what made me hesitate? Well, you will notice that the photograph does not appear here. That's not a permissions issue—Ken would be entirely happy with me including it in this column. It's because I don't think anyone should see it without warning. It's workplace-safe...but it's not entirely sanity-safe. It's not the least bit gory, but it is gruesome. With that warning, here's a link. Imagine facing that as a 16x20" print in glorious dye transfer, nose to nose with the subject. I really wasn't sure I was up to it. I had to pretty seriously disconnect emotionally when working on that photograph for Ken. Otherwise, it was just too much to take. With long-term exposure and familiarity, I've become sufficiently desensitized to the image that it doesn't cause me grief to print now. Once I'd finished that task I took stock of the darkroom and discovered a photograph (above) that I'd only I'd half-completed printing, part of the Jewels of Kilauea series. Something had interrupted me midstream (I have no idea what). It seemed fitting to finish off that one last 8x10" photograph before calling it quits. That I did. Made myself four finished prints. Officially consigned the Ctein Darkoom Era to the dustbin of history. Ceremonially dumped the trays of dye down the sink (don't worry, it's environmentally safe) and watched the inky rainbow swirl down the drain. In case you're wondering, yes, I do have considerable amounts of dye transfer dye left, as well as a stock of small dye transfer paper. I'm not physically prevented from making more dye transfer prints. Yet. But it's not a decision I'm going to be reversing any more than the one to stop using film (and anyone who might imagine otherwise really doesn't know me at all). I'm making progress towards making the decision physically irreversible. Sunday, a TOP reader drove down from Mendocino and bought my Beseler 45 V-XL, color head and 8x10 head. That's three out of the four "too big to want to ship" items I listed in my column two weeks ago, gone. I'm delighted...and surprised. Mike and I had a shared bet with the Universe that I wouldn't be able to get rid of that stuff. There are pre
about 3 hours ago
The beer halls are empty and steins put away from the 180th Oktoberfest in Munich. The world's largest traditional Bavarian beer festival, celebrated by an estimated 6 million visitors, wrapped up last Sunday. Only beer brewed within cit...
The beer halls are empty and steins put away from the 180th Oktoberfest in Munich. The world's largest traditional Bavarian beer festival, celebrated by an estimated 6 million visitors, wrapped up last Sunday. Only beer brewed within city limits by six makers was allowed to be served up. The event dates to 1810 when Crown Prince Ludwig was married to Princess Therese and the people were invited to attend the festivities. -- Lloyd Young( 32 photos )Revelers celebrate the opening ceremony in the "Hofbraeuzelt' beer tent of the 180th Bavarian Oktoberfest beer festival in Munich on Sept. 21. The world's largest beer festival, held from Sept. 21- Oct. 6, is expected to attract more than six million guests from around the world. (Matthias Schrader/Associated Press)
about 3 hours ago
Every week, we ask our eclectic group of writers to weigh in on a question that is asked in the comments from our own readers. The questions can be anything relating to photography, and we invite everyone to participate in our segment ca...
Every week, we ask our eclectic group of writers to weigh in on a question that is asked in the comments from our own readers. The questions can be anything relating to photography, and we invite everyone to participate in our segment called “Fstoppers Answers“. This week, we ask “Corporate Headshots for Local Realtor Firm. Ten Clients, One Headshot a Piece. What do you charge and why?” [more]
about 5 hours ago
New at DPS: How to Photograph Dramatic Clouds at Sunset
New at DPS: How to Photograph Dramatic Clouds at Sunset
about 6 hours ago
The difference between a nice sunset and a dramatic sunset is all about the clouds. Of course, the difference between a dramatic sunset and no sunset is all about the clouds too! A clear sky at sunset might turn a shade of pale blue or...
The difference between a nice sunset and a dramatic sunset is all about the clouds. Of course, the difference between a dramatic sunset and no sunset is all about the clouds too! A clear sky at sunset might turn a shade of pale blue or pink, which is beautiful and calming, but with just the right amount of clouds the sky becomes alive with fire and drama as the day’s last rays reflect off the clouds making them red, orange, purple and pink. Not all clouds are created equal though. They come in many shapes, sizes, densities, and altitudes, and they all refract or absorb the light in different ways that can drastically change the quality of your photographs. Types of Clouds Clouds that hang low in the sky and form a band on the horizon or appear like a thick blanket covering the sky will block the sun’s high-flying rays and make the sunset pretty anti-climactic, if you can see it at all. Sometimes large and lumpy clouds that are brighter on the top and dark on the bottom can create a lot of contrast, making for a very moody atmosphere. Rain, snow, and hail clouds fall under this category, as the weight of the excess moisture weighs them down. The most radiant displays of colour emerge when the clouds are very high in the sky. They are usually smaller, whiter, and thinner than the low-lying clouds, and they are able to catch the sunlight from beneath, allowing us to view those fiery colours from the ground. These are more likely to occur when the weather is hot and dry, which is why desert landscapes are famous for their magnificent sunsets. When you want to create a dazzling sunset photo, these are the clouds you want to look out for. Predicting the Weather Sunsets don’t last very long, so it takes a little planning and a lot of luck to have nature set up the perfect sky for you. You never know when the ideal conditions are going to present themselves, but if you tune your senses to the weather and its patterns, you will start to get an idea of when you can expect to see the right amount of clouds in a sunset sky. Watch the sky over the course of the day to see what kinds of clouds are forming and how fast they’re drifting overhead. Check your local weather forecast to find out when the sun will go down, and try to judge if they’ll be sticking around based on the time of day and the speed of their movement. Keep informed about any storms coming in that will bring low-hanging clouds along with them. If you have a great view from your back yard, all you have to do is keep your camera at hand so you can dart out when you see a great sky. On the other hand, if your aim is to travel to a more distant location to get your shot, you’ll have to be a little more precise in your calculations to avoid hauling all your gear up a mountain only to have the clouds dissipate. Your best bet is to choose a location that will be beautiful with or without clouds – that way, if nature doesn’t cooperate, you haven’t wasted the trip. The Perfect Exposure The most effective way of bringing out the natural saturation of coloured light is to underexpose very slightly – between a half-stop and a full stop. This darkens the rest of the image, making the colour pop in comparison. Use your exposure compensation to adjust this. To make sure you get the best possible exposure, bracket your shots. This means taking several images at different exposures, so you can analyze them on your computer at home in order to determine which is the most successful. This can be done manually using your exposure compensation setting – take one image using the camera’s default settings, then take one that is underexposed by half a stop and one that is overexposed by half a stop. Some cameras will have an automatic bracketing option that you can utilize to change these settings for you. Another option is to create a high-dynamic range (HDR) image by combining multiple exposures as I did in this photo of a Joshua T
about 6 hours ago