Photography Tips And Tutorials

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In this article, I will cover a core concept in photography that is neglected by a surprising amount of photographers. Photography is a wonderful mixture of science and art. The science part can be intriguing and is an important aspect b...
In this article, I will cover a core concept in photography that is neglected by a surprising amount of photographers. Photography is a wonderful mixture of science and art. The science part can be intriguing and is an important aspect but not the whole of it. “downtownLA” captured by rjnic (click image to see more from rjnic) Techniques like depth-of-field control, slow shutter speed effects or motion freeze are all interesting but they only compliment one of the core concepts of photography which is closer to art: composition. Composition A photographer is an Artist and a dreadful fate of an artist is “predictability”. And it is this area where we are all set apart from each other. We see things differently, perceive differently and of course think differently. Although biologically we are all human, all these contribute to the “uniqueness” of one person and hence to his/her creation in any field of art. So am I saying only a specific people can become a photographer? Absolutely not. We, humans, have an excellent gift of learning. We learn by imitating, we learn by reading and collaborating through communication. Same applies to photography. We first have to imitate the best works from legendary photographers, try to “see through” their work, analyze it, appreciate it and follow it before we can innovate our own styles. After going through a bunch of photography works from distinguished photographers like Ansel Adams, Edward Curtis and Irving Penn and many others… I noticed “few” patterns and commonalities that make their work extraordinary. And then after researching on internet and library books, I found there are a LOT of concepts and ideas behind those “few” patterns. Somehow the patterns were “deliberately” introduced to be noticed and CREATING new ideas for the rest of the photographers (like me) to learn and adore. Here I am going to share some of my insights combining already available plethora of information on this topic while throwing in some of my examples in this engaging discussion of COMPOSITION: How to make a photo more “appealing” and “pleasing” to our eyes. Like good food is not a direct outcome of cooking in a good utensil, it’s the photographer’s decision that makes a photo great and hardly the camera itself. Of course you must know the technical part of taking the photo or you will land up ruining your best shot due to incorrect camera and flash settings. “viento2″ captured by Raluca Mateescu (Click Image to See More From Raluca Mateescu) This discussion is very subjective, slightly controversial but informative as well. Please understand, real artists are not confined into any set of rules. But I can guarantee you that they are MORE aware of these “rules” than us and thus are able to consciously take a superior decisions to either follow the rules or break them. So I would suggest that my tips are mere guidelines and are not meant to be followed diligently in EVERY situation. Sounds kind of a disclaimer, huh… well it’s a message from a photographer to a photographer. Most of the time we THINK that we are limited by what is presented to us for taking photos, but little we REALIZE that it us who choose WHAT we photograph, in what ANGLE, from what POSITION. and WHEN we press the shutter, click! Now let’s jump right in. For simplicity I have broken the material into four easy key elements to remember and understand and I will cover two of them in Part I of this article: I. Choose the subject Be a miser when choosing your subject. Do not try to include EVERYTHING you see in a SINGLE photo. I got a great advice from one my photographer friend that I am going to share with you - While Painting a picture we start from a blank canvas and “add” objects and colors on it to produce a finished painting. With Photography, we start with a sc
about 10 hours ago
Dave, a seasoned cameraman, has always been searching for the Holy Grail of photography—“that steady shot, that really stable picture.” When he’s not shooting, Dave is holed away in his man cave, inventing creative rigs aimed at stabiliz...
Dave, a seasoned cameraman, has always been searching for the Holy Grail of photography—“that steady shot, that really stable picture.” When he’s not shooting, Dave is holed away in his man cave, inventing creative rigs aimed at stabilizing photographs and video footage. Dave’s football helmet DSLR clearly puts the GoPro to shame, and yet he’s never been able to attain perfect clarity in motion—until now. In this video, Dave reveals the secret to how he forever solved the image stabilization problem of photographers and videographers everywhere… with the help of Lizzy, his pet chicken: Scientifically, Dave is spot on. The genus name for the domesticated fowl is Gallus gallus domesticus, which is where he derived the name “Galluscam.” What’s more, chickens really are great tripods, since they can seamlessly stabilize their heads regardless of how their bodies move, as illustrated in the full version of the Smarter Every Day video clip that inspired Dave to give Lizzy a shot—literally. It’s the most extreme camera—ever. Officially called “Steady Feathers,” this clever LG ad for the G2 smartphone has gone viral, but it’s not the only one. Several of LG’s “So Real It’s Scary” commercials advertising its lifelike IPS monitors are also quite popular. Go to full article: Man Achieves Breakthrough in the Pursuit of Perfect Image Stabilization What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+ Article from: PictureCorrect Photography Tips
about 11 hours ago
Everyone has seen “that photographer” at one time or another. He’s the guy rocking his camera around his neck, gazing around his surroundings in a perplexed manner while his model rolls her eyes and glances at her watch...
Everyone has seen “that photographer” at one time or another. He’s the guy rocking his camera around his neck, gazing around his surroundings in a perplexed manner while his model rolls her eyes and glances at her watch. Clearly, he doesn’t have a clue and is one of the least cool photographers in the business. Photographer Jimmy Hickey comes to the rescue of this poor soul (and many photographers like him) in his 7 tip tutorial. Hickey explains why it is important to look cool while snapping photos since, as a photographer, “you are representing the art as a whole.” Hickey’s 7 tips to being a cooler photographer: 1. Don’t be a tourist. Avoid wearing your camera strap around your neck, unless you have a desire to look incredibly uncool. Instead, wear the strap over your shoulder or just grab the camera with your hands. Hickey’s one caveat is that you should wear the neck strap when you are shooting over a cliff, near water, or in any other spot where you have the potential to drop or lose your camera. 2. Relate to your subject. Express genuine interest in your subject in order to connect with him and make him more relaxed in front of the camera. 3. Everything you do is intentional. Stay confident, roll with the punches, and work with any situation in the best way possible. 4. Avoid cheap filters. They may protect your lens, but you will sacrifice the quality of your image. 5. Muscle your creativity. Trust your gut when shooting and strive to make your work stand out from the pack. 6. Hold your camera correctly. Place your left hand palm-up to support and focus your lens while your right hand grips the camera body and controls the shutter. 7. Your camera gear is made to be used. Get in there and get the shot. Hickey says that sometimes, you can’t get the amazing shots without risking your gear. Using your camera near water comes with risks, but can get you a cool shot. Go to full article: 7 Tips to Make You A Cooler Photographer What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+ Article from: PictureCorrect Photography Tips
about 16 hours ago
Seascapes make an excellent learning ground where diverse techniques can be practiced and mastered. This new series of e-books has been written to teach you everything you need to know to start taking marvelous seascapes – from the...
Seascapes make an excellent learning ground where diverse techniques can be practiced and mastered. This new series of e-books has been written to teach you everything you need to know to start taking marvelous seascapes – from the most basic and hassle-free techniques, through to the most complex and demanding contemporary disciplines at the cutting edge of our art and craft. We were able to arrange 25% off for our readers until next Tuesday, simply use the voucher code PICTURECORRECT at checkout. Now available here: Seascape Photography Guide Bundle New: In-depth Seascape Photography Guide For landscape photographers, places where the oceans meet the land are an absolute wealth of opportunity. The combination of weather, tides, seasons and the huge diversity of habitat and details is almost unsurpassed by any other environment. Maritime climates are usually dynamic, and the rhythm of the tides and the passing clouds make it relatively straightforward to create images bursting with energy and flow. Topics Covered (33&87 Pages): Introduction The Creative Cycle (Vision, Technique, Processing) Equipment Vision Inspiration & Style Learning to See Subjects & Stimulation Colours, Shapes & Patterns The Camera Eye Vision Summary Composition Organisation & Clarity Rules & Guidelines Aspect Ratios Lines & Curves Flow Balance & Visual Weight Abstraction, Intimacy & Minimalism Composition – Summary Creative Vision Visualization Creative Vision Case Study Pages from the Seascape Vision & Composition Guide Seascape Photography is not a linear process; we can be thinking about a final image and how it may look long before we take our camera out of the bag. Assessments of Exposure and Depth of Field are disciplines we should be considering right at the beginning in our Visualization phase. “Photography is a marriage of art and craft, and it is our familiarity with the techniques and mechanics of photography that allow us to relax and be artistically expressive.” -Author Alister Benn How to Get the Discounted Bundle This Week: Our readers can receive 25% off until Tuesday, October 15 by using the discount code PICTURECORRECT at checkout. The guides come in PDF format that can be read on computers, phones and most tablet computers (works great as a mobile reference out in the field). The deal can be found here: Seascape Photography Guide Bundle Go to full article: New Release: Seascape Photography Guide Bundle What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+ Article from: PictureCorrect Photography Tips
1 day ago
In Hawaii, there exists one of the best astronomy observatories in the Northern Hemisphere. At 14,000 feet atop Mauna Kea sits several huge telescopes (about 33 feet wide!) and many other astronomy oriented equipment. Sean Goebel, a grad...
In Hawaii, there exists one of the best astronomy observatories in the Northern Hemisphere. At 14,000 feet atop Mauna Kea sits several huge telescopes (about 33 feet wide!) and many other astronomy oriented equipment. Sean Goebel, a graduate student at the university of Hawaii, has spent a good deal of time inside (and outside) these incredible facilities. Hiking around in the freezing cold, acclimating to the altitude, and running on only a few hours of sleep, Goebel went above and beyond to film this incredible timelapse: Goebel shot his timelapse with a Canon 5D Mk II and Rebel XT. The major lenses he used to film were a Rokinon 24mm f/1.4, a Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8, and a Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8. He also used a home-build rotary table to incorporate camera movements. Things to Consider When Planning a Night Sky Timelapse: Location – If you’re just filming the sky, you may not think that your location would affect your timelapse much. However, the amount of light in your surrounding area can greatly affect how clear your night sky shots are. Moon Phase – The brighter the moon, the more difficult it will be to balance out the brightness of it and the stars. Goebel was cautious to shoot when the moon phase was small. Weather – A cloudy night will ruin a night sky timelapse. Check your local weather station for clear nights free of clouds or rain. Also be prepared for temperature changes as it can drop severely from day to night in some places. Events – Are you waiting for something specific to happen? A meteor shower perhaps or a lunar eclipse? Always check out information about upcoming astronomical events and also events in your local area that could disrupt your filming (ie. fireworks show) Mauna Kea sits 14,000 feet above sea level And to answer your first question after watching this video, yes, the lasers are real. They are used for adaptive optics and monitor atmospheric turbulence. This information is sent to a mirror in the telescope that moves hundreds of times a second to cancel out the blurring. Go to full article: Night Sky Timelapse Photography of the Mauna Kea Observatory (With Lasers) What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+ Article from: PictureCorrect Photography Tips
1 day ago
Who says you can’t drive AND take photos at the same time? These two clever photographers came up with the idea of setting a camera up on a tripod in the back of their Mini Cooper to capture an image of them cruising downtown at ni...
Who says you can’t drive AND take photos at the same time? These two clever photographers came up with the idea of setting a camera up on a tripod in the back of their Mini Cooper to capture an image of them cruising downtown at night. Of course, you don’t need a Mini to try this yourself, however, the convertible does allow for a lot more to be captured: (Via Imgur, click to view full size) If you want to re-create a shot like this for yourself, make sure you have a sturdy tripod that’s securely fastened to your car. The last thing you want to do is look back to find your camera lying on the road in pieces. Also remember to use a slow shutter speed if you’re going for the blurred effect like in this photo. The slower the shutter speed, the more blur you’ll get. Go to full article: Interesting Photo of the Day: Taking the Camera for a Night on the Town What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+ Article from: PictureCorrect Photography Tips
1 day ago
Wedding photography wreckers. You’ve seen them. You might even be one of them. They’re the guests at weddings who spend the whole ceremony and reception moving about snapping pictures of the happy couple with anything from ce...
Wedding photography wreckers. You’ve seen them. You might even be one of them. They’re the guests at weddings who spend the whole ceremony and reception moving about snapping pictures of the happy couple with anything from cell phones to point-and-shoots to Go Pros to iPads to DSLRs, meanwhile obstructing the professional photographer’s view. And they’re the subject of this KTXL FOX40 “Don’t Be That Guy” segment: The job of a wedding photographer or videographer has never been easy. And it’s not getting any easier. In a society where everyone wants to share life as it happens on Facebook, Instagram, and other social media outlets, you can’t go anywhere–especially a wedding–without seeing a sea of phones and cameras held in front of peoples’ faces. Photographers must contend with stray flashes that wash out their shots, guests jumping in front of them during the first kiss, and iPhones creeping into every frame. Wedding photographers have to go to extremes to ensure that they can get the photographs their clients have paid for without well-intentioned guests ruining their shots. It’s becoming more and more routine for photographers to write a “no camera” policy into their contracts. Many photographers are asking couples to instruct their guests to please enjoy the festivities and let the professional photographer document the day. Have you unknowingly committed this wedding day taboo? Or are you a hired wedding photographer who’s been frustrated by this social pet peeve? Perhaps the “unplugged” wedding–at which no cameras or phones are permitted–is a trend we can all agree upon. “You might have to get creative, because the back of somebody’s head’s not something you really want to look at…” –Alex Cristescu Go to full article: The Curse of the Wedding Photography Wrecker What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+ Article from: PictureCorrect Photography Tips
1 day ago
Extra photos for bloggers: 1, 2, 3 We’ve found the secret to making your video footage downright moving! The (not so) secret, is moving your camera as you shoot. The Mobislyder makes it easy to add dimension to your videos with...
Extra photos for bloggers: 1, 2, 3 We’ve found the secret to making your video footage downright moving! The (not so) secret, is moving your camera as you shoot. The Mobislyder makes it easy to add dimension to your videos with pro level pans and epically smooth pulls. This gizmo is a shrunken down version of the big ‘ol sliders used on movie sets. It’s made of precision cut aluminum and fitted with an adjustable clamp to hold tight to any camera phone. We’ve been having a ball with this gadget and are here to share our four fave techniques for adding professional polish to your next videographic masterpiece. Check Out The Mobislyder $95 at the Photojojo Store Why It’s Cool Moving your camera while you shoot gives your videos a more movie-like quality simply because that’s what the pros do when they’re making movies! Use any (or all) of the following techniques to give your vids that Hollywood look, no matter where you’re filming. Track the Action With a simple left to right (or right to left) push, follow your subject across a scene. The effect is subtle and feels very natural because a smooth pan is precisely how humans take in a scene when they’re watching through their eyeballs, not a camera. PRO-TIP: To give your viewers the feeling of scanning the scene at eye level, mount your Mobislyder to a tripod like we did for this vid. Surprise! Master the Reveal When your camera is on the move, you get to control what part of the scene your viewers are privy to. Just wait till you see what’s around this corner, over this fence, behind this pole… The possibilities are endless. PRO-TIP: Use your slide behind an obstruction to change up the scene. When you slide back to the action, you’ll give your viewers a surprise! Movin’ on Up (or Down) The tide does it, pogo sitcks do it, even see-saws do it. Let’s do it. Let’s go up and down! A vertical slide lets you smoothly scan an object that’s too tall to fit in a single frame or follow action that’s changing in elevation. PRO-TIP: Meld together tracking the action and the art of the reveal, like we did in this video! Zoom to Focus Lock the focus on a specific object then pull away or move in close to throw it out of focus. With an iPhone you can lock the focus by tap-and-holding on your subject until the focus box pulses. Locking the focus on Android phones varies from model to model. Google your phone model and “focus lock” to find out how it’s done. PRO-TIP: The Mobislyder lets you move your phone very smoothly, more quickly than your auto focus can handle. Leave your phone in auto focus mode to see your subject lose focus, then snap back into focus as your AF catches up. Taking It Further Mount a Photojojo Cell Lens onto your phone to shoot video with a fisheye, telephoto, wide angle or even macro view. Slide your camera diagonally for a fun if somewhat wonky look. Wonky can be good! Tie a string to your Mobislyder to slide your phone during filming, while you’re in the shot! Our pal Margo did that in this video here. Head over to the Photojojo Shop and learn everything you’ve ever wanted to know about the Mobislyder and more! Related posts: Pro-Tips for Shooting Better Instagram Videos Extra vids for bloggers: 1, 2, 3 “Well that’s weird,”... 10 Editing Tips for Making Killer Instagram Videos Extra vids for bloggers: 1, 2, 3 When it comes... Bubble Photography: 3 Insanely Cool Techniques Frolicking about the garden chasing butterflies and bubbles with camera...
2 days ago
While it’s common practice in photography to attach your lens to the camera before shooting, there are some beautiful exceptions to that rule. The unique perspective added by the lens, whether inverted or right side up, lends a different...
While it’s common practice in photography to attach your lens to the camera before shooting, there are some beautiful exceptions to that rule. The unique perspective added by the lens, whether inverted or right side up, lends a different kind of filtered effect. In the photo below, photographer elkie3 used an inexpensive wide angle/macro filter she purchased off of eBay: Interesting Photo of the Day: Burragorang Lookout in Australia (Via Imgur, click to see full size) Go to full article: Interesting Photo of the Day: Looking Through a Lens What are your thoughts on this article? Join the discussion on Facebook or Google+ Article from: PictureCorrect Photography Tips
2 days ago
Learning photography is a difficult process that requires a lot of patience and practice. This photography lesson concentrates on the basics of exposure, its definition, importance, and finally, its implementation. “High ISO –...
Learning photography is a difficult process that requires a lot of patience and practice. This photography lesson concentrates on the basics of exposure, its definition, importance, and finally, its implementation. “High ISO – Moon” captured by ‘citylovesyou_ffm’ Light is the most important criteria in learning photography. Light creates the texture around you. It defines the composition of not only the object but also its surroundings. The whole idea of photography revolves around light and its laws of reflection and refraction. Exposure means the amount of light that your camera gathers while taking a photograph. It’s the foundation of digital photography. One of the most important exposure parameters is called ISO, and it’s truly the key to solving some difficult exposure problems. But it is very important that you have this aperture and shutter speed thing under your belt before you move on to ISO. ISO is a measure of the sensitivity of your image sensor. If you have a film background, then you are probably already familiar with ISO as a measure of film sensitivity–sometimes referred to as film speed–and you may even remember ISO being referred to as ASA. ISO is the same thing. By default, your camera is probably set to an ISO of 100 or 200. Now, for the sake of example, I am going to say that I don’t have a tripod here. Let’s say I stumbled into this scene while I was out walking around shooting hand-held, and I am ready to take a shot of it. I am lining up my shot, and I am half-pressing my shutter button to meter. But when I look down at my shutter speed, it’s saying 1/15 of a second. That’s way too slow for hand-held shooting. Now, there are times when you can stabilize your camera, but 1/15 of a second is too slow. So what I am going to do is increase the ISO on my camera. I am going to dial it up from 100 to 200, and now when I meter, I see I am at 1/30 of a second. Then, at ISO 400, I am at 1/60 of a second. I am going to dial it up a little farther. I am going to go to ISO 800, and now I am at 1/125 of a second. That’s plenty for hand-held shooting. I can take my shot. As ISO increases, it takes your camera less time to gather light. This means that you can get away with shorter shutter speeds, which is what just happened here. Now, the question is how does it work? When data is first read off of your camera’s image sensor, it’s in the form of tiny, little electrical charges. Before those charges can be analyzed, they have to be amplified, because they are very minute signals. When you increase the ISO setting on your camera, all you are doing is turning up that amplification. Now, because it is more amplified, weaker light levels are more significant, so you can get away with less light, which means shorter exposure times or smaller apertures. “ISO Low Light Comparisons” captured by Raymond Larose Now think about what happens when you turn up the volume on your stereo. As you amplify the sound more, it gets louder, but you’ll also hear more noise–a hissy sound. Electrical components in your amplifier, other gizmos in your house, cosmic rays passing through the room–these all generate electrical noise, and as you amplify your sound, you also amplify that noise. You hear a noisy hiss as your volume gets louder. Your image sensor works exactly the same way. As you increase the amplification of the signals that come off the sensor, you exaggerate any noise that the sensor might have recorded from the other electrical components in the camera, or those cosmic rays that might be passing by. And you’ll find that that noise will appear in your image as speckled patterns that look like this. Now, how much noise will be generated will depend on your camera. Obviously, you’d prefer not to have noise in your images, so you should always try to keep ISO as low as possible. That said, the abi
2 days ago