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We started the day expecting to play five levels. We got four. Such has been the pace of this Main Event that tournament staff feared having time on their hands. We reduced the field from 106 to 45 today. Tomorrow that number will be tri...
We started the day expecting to play five levels. We got four. Such has been the pace of this Main Event that tournament staff feared having time on their hands. We reduced the field from 106 to 45 today. Tomorrow that number will be trimmed even further as we play on to a final eight on Saturday. It meant a short day today, but still one packed with fun and adventure -- for some players anyway. Martin Kozlov leads tonight. He bagged-up 1,351,000 a short while ago as the echo of "all-in-and-a-call" finally subsided. It's been a good week so far for the former ANZPT Melbourne winner, a point not lost on Salman Behbehani who watched Kozlov bag up tonight. Chip leader tonight: Martin Kozlov "Is that you?" he asked, pointing at Kozlov's stack. "Yeah," replied the Aussie. "Welcome to Europe," said Behbehani, pumping fists with his new best friend. Not far behind Kozlov is Ludovic Geilich in second place. The UKIPT/Estrellas Marbella winner bags up 1,219,000 tonight, looking to add EPT silverware to a Marbella tan. Ludovic Geilich It bodes well that the field contains some interesting faces to make Day 4, which starts at noon tomorrow. David Yan plays with a natural talent that seems to beget chips. It's almost as if, through the simple process of moving his hands and chips around, that more of them appear in front of him. Then, when he gets them, he tosses them around like the worthless objects that in reality they are. It's a spectacle to marvel at, like the perfect golf swing. Tonight it's good for 1,046,000. David Yan Tudor Purice continued to dominate for much of the day, and while not up top, remains among the lead group after another day of play. The Romanian closed with 824,000. Ole Nergard is an unforgiving player. His flush against Ryan Yu late in the day helped secure him a stack of 550,000. While Yu looked visibly distressed about the hand that cost him so much, Nergard looked visibly uninterested. It's an icy determination that will serve him well tomorrow. Kitty Kuo continues to impress. She sparkled on the feature table today, surviving through trademark self-belief, and the occasional all-in. She has 162,000 tonight. Kitty Kuo We all get into this business having been inspired by someone. For at least one member of the press corp (Chad Holloway), it was the antics of Dave "Devilfish" Ulliott throughout the past decade. Ulliott will return tomorrow with a stack of 250,000. Will the Devilfish enjoy some kind of renaissance? We'll find out tomorrow. Dave "Devilfish" Ulliott As we reported earlier, the tale of Nicolau Villa-Lobos is an incredible one; a story that would be made even more remarkable should the former SCOOP and UKIPT winner triumph in London. But given his performance today, and a stack of 244,000, it's not out of the question. Nicolau Villa-Lobos Paul Berende has earned more than $1,6 million in live tournaments around the world but has yet to reach an EPT Main Event final table. His stack of 200,000 is on the short side, but could help make that a reality as the week continues. Paul Berende For the counts of all the 45 players bagging up tonight, check out our live coverage page. There were some equally distinguished players making their way to the rail today. Gaelle Baumann was the first player out in the money in 87th place, followed by Fabian Quoss and Theo Jorgensen in 85th and 81st respectively. Gaelle Baumann Henrique Pinho was the last of the Team PokerStars Pros to depart, in 79th place, while Matthew Frankland (71st), Mike Watson (67th) and Chris Brammer (63rd) would follow. We started the day with a word from chip leader Tudor Purice before turning our attention to the EPT Awards winners Steve Odwyer and Walid Bou-Habib. As the bubble burst we found it to be a rather British one, which was one of various elements of the week that has made it onto our "EPT Quote Board". The TV table in full swing We all start out inspired by someone in the
about 3 hours ago
Ever since the World Series introduced its November Nine concept, the players still involved in that event have tended to use the hiatus to travel around the world playing poker knowing that no matter what happens anywhere else, they are...
Ever since the World Series introduced its November Nine concept, the players still involved in that event have tended to use the hiatus to travel around the world playing poker knowing that no matter what happens anywhere else, they are due a six or seven figure payday very soon. The freedom has often worked in their favour and several players have ended up picking up other brilliant scores. (Ivan Demidov famously made the final table of the WSOP-E before going on to finish runner up in Vegas.) This year, Mark Newhouse is on a similar European vacation before returning to the Rio for his moment of destiny. And what do you know, he's made the money and is plodding along nicely. Laura Cornelius, of PokerStars.tv, caught up with the November Niner for a little chat in London. The calm at the eye of the storm
about 3 hours ago
The final 60 players in the main event occupy only eight tables in Tournament Room A, the biggest in the sprawling Grand Connaught Rooms complex. Admittedly one of those tables is at the centre of the television set, so takes up the spac...
The final 60 players in the main event occupy only eight tables in Tournament Room A, the biggest in the sprawling Grand Connaught Rooms complex. Admittedly one of those tables is at the centre of the television set, so takes up the space of about 12 others. But the point is that the "main" event doesn't seem so "main" as it once did. EPT London TV table The freeing of all the additional tables allowed tournament officials to start the £1,000 Heads Up event today, which always needs floor space and dealing staff disproportionate to both its buy in and number of players. They started with 32 and at time of writing are playing out the third round. Yann Dion and Will Fallia lost their first matches; Keith Hawkins and Christian de Leon went out in the second round. Phil Hellmuth, with one side event title to his name already this week, is the biggest name still involved. He is currently playing Tai Loi Yuen, although there are still two more matches until they make the money. Upstairs in the tournament room nearest the webcast studio, Eugene Katchalov is among a clutch of high profile players still in the £2,000 NLHE event. Jonathan Duhamel went out shortly before the money, but that still left Katchalov, Martin Jacobsen, Hauke Heseding and Ami Barer in the final 11. With £77,780 up top, it's still worth winning. Just made the final table of the £2k side event in #eptlondon ...I'm 4/9 in chips— Eugene Katchalov (@EugeneKatchalov) October 9, 2013 There's a healthy field assembling too in the £1,000 (one-rebuy) event. They are just into level three and the tournament board shows 137 entries, including Kent Lundmark, Marcin Horecki, Tom Hall, Jack Salter and Vojtech Ruzicka. Registration is still open in that one. Meanwhile back downstairs, the PLO event #22 is due to start soon. Even though the main event is playing a short day, the rest of the action continues through the night. Check out the full side event schedule on the Main EPT London page. Follow all the action from EPT London on the EPT London Main Event page, with chip counts and hand-by-hand reporting. EPT Live is at EPT Live.
about 3 hours ago
The bursting of the bubble guaranteed consecutive cashes for Tamer Kamel at EPT London. Last year Kamel had something of a breakthrough in his home town event, his seventh place marking a career best, worth nearly £80,000. That propelled...
The bursting of the bubble guaranteed consecutive cashes for Tamer Kamel at EPT London. Last year Kamel had something of a breakthrough in his home town event, his seventh place marking a career best, worth nearly £80,000. That propelled him to further cashes, both on the EPT and in Las Vegas, and the odd memorable encounter. There's something quite different about Kamel, an aspect that which keeps him grounded and the poker fun, even when faced with the line-up he started with today -- including David Yan, Gaelle Bauman and Mathew Frankland. Kamel puts it down to life outside of poker, one that ensures that whatever happens here is a bonus. "I've been playing for maybe three or four years," said Kamel at the first break. "I didn't know how to play until I started in a friendly game. Then I was always playing in my spare time. I have a job, so I'm not an actual pro but I play a lot of these big events." Kamel's "amateur" status works in his favor. When he's not playing he runs his family's Italian Pizzeria on Goodge Street, in London. As director he oversees its day-to-day running, using poker to satisfy his competitive streak, after an injury forced him to quit football. Tamer Kamel "I think it takes a lot of pressure off," said Kamel of his world outside the game. "I'm able to relax a little bit when I'm playing a tournament - it's not the be all and end all -I have an income. "I'm getting married in December. I proposed a year ago so that started off the year that I'm having. I think that's a good thing as well, I've felt a lot more secure in myself. I've been playing better. Also what I like is that I'm quite low key, there have been no blogs about me and I'm quite happy about that." The blog has happily put an end to that idea, but Kamel seems a more accomplished player to the one he was a season ago, pleased with his development which he credits, in part, to playing the best players in the world. "One of my favourite things was playing Phil Ivey in Monte Carlo," he said. "It was amazing to see everyone awestruck at the table but to me I couldn't believe I got the chance to play him. We didn't play many hands but I got talking to him." Kamel is right about that table. As we wrote at the time, there was an obvious sense of wonder. But of all everyone at that table Kamel, sitting directly on Ivey's right, seemed unfazed, relishing the opportunity rather than fearing it. "I've always been like that," said Kamel. "I'm very confident in myself. [I just thought] he's a human being, I'm a human being, he's got a brain and I've got a brain. Let's tango and see what happens." Kamel capitalized on that attitude, going deep in a $1K event at the World Series, a result that as far as he was concerned make it a successful summer - after all, it's all about the performance, not simply the result. "I'm in it because I love competing," said Kamel. "I enjoy the game so much but I want to be the best. To me that's more fun than the getting a score here and there and surviving, because I've got my own income. But obviously it would be good!" Alas, that next big score will not come in London, Kamel being among the first to bust after the bubble. But you sense it can't be far off. Stephen Bartley is a PokerStars Blog reporter.
about 4 hours ago
Before play started on day three of EPT London, the tournament staff prepared the room to the sound of The Who. As the carpets were vacuumed and chip bags dumped on tables, we heard Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey over the loudspeakers ...
Before play started on day three of EPT London, the tournament staff prepared the room to the sound of The Who. As the carpets were vacuumed and chip bags dumped on tables, we heard Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey over the loudspeakers talking about their generation and insisting that The Kids Are Alright. It seemed a little incongruous. Music in poker tends usually to be confined to the headphones clamped around the players' heads rather than broadcast across the room. But for at least one player in the field today, music has been ever-present in his life, even if his career in cards has led him away from the concert-halls occupied by his forefathers. "The uncle of my grandfather was a famous maestro; I think he's world-renowned," said Nicolau Villa-Lobos during a break in play at EPT London. "My father is a guitar player, in what I think is the greatest rock band that ever existed in Brazil." Coming from pretty much anyone else, this may have sounded like empty hyperbole. But the great-great uncle of our 25-year-old poker player was Heitor Villa-Lobos (1887-1959), described as "the single most significant creative figure in 20th-century Brazilian art music". His father is Dado Villa-Lobos, a founder member of Legião Urbana, a band that released eight albums between 1985-1997 and became known as Latin America's answer to The Smiths and Joy Division. "I always thought it would be a bit hypocritical if my father had told me not to play poker, because when he was my age, he started to play guitar," the younger Villa-Lobos said today. "And imagine if his father had told him not to play guitar." Nicolau Villa-Lobos: taking a talented family in a new direction Villa-Lobos's entry into poker is actually even more complicated than just a privileged youngster taking up the game on a whim. When he was 18, the typical footballing, skateboarding, surfing, happy-go-lucky kid from Rio de Janeiro discovered that he had been born with a heart defect that required emergency surgery. After a 24-hour stay in hospital -- "It was pretty serious," he said -- Villa-Lobos was told he needed to avoid athletic sports for close to a year, keeping him away from the beaches and the soccer fields, an agony for the average Brazilian youth. He turned instead to poker, which was then in its infancy in Brazil, and had just attracted the inaugural Latin American Poker Tour (LAPT) event to Rio in May 2008. "I dealt in that in event," Villa-Lobos said. "That was exactly when I started to play, in the clubs. One of the owners of the clubs asked me if I wanted to be a dealer in the competition." He added: "I could speak a little English then and I met a lot of poker stars at that time: Chad Brown, Greg Raymer, Chris Moneymaker. I became friends with the winner, Julien Nuijten, the Dutch kid. I played Magic: The Gathering a little bit and he was the world champion." Villa-Lobos focused on his game as poker took off dramatically in Brazil. Alexandre Gomes and Andre Akkari won World Series bracelets and the Brazilian Series of Poker launched in the country, which last year attracted more than 1,200 players, one of the five biggest fields in the world. Villa-Lobos would then pull off his own spectacular double coup, winning UKIPT Edinburgh in January of this year, dropping in on the Scottish capital while on a family holiday to Europe. He won £101,000 for that but then returned to Rio, fired up PokerStars where he plays as "nicofello", and won the SCOOP medium main event for the best part of $500,000. "After the SCOOP win, there was a huge party," Villa-Lobos said. "My family was very happy. They were here also in Edinburgh when I won the UKIPT. So they support me. They are great. "When I had my heart surgery, my mother and father would have felt bad if they had told me it was something I couldn't do. They let me play. They let me do whatever I wanted because there were so many things I couldn't do." Villa-Lobos's heart is now behaving properly, even
about 5 hours ago
The PokerStars Blog video team took to the floor of the EPT10 London Poker Festival to find out which players inspired the stars of today's game. Click on the video below. Who's YOUR poker idol? Click here to follow the EPT ...
The PokerStars Blog video team took to the floor of the EPT10 London Poker Festival to find out which players inspired the stars of today's game. Click on the video below. Who's YOUR poker idol? Click here to follow the EPT Main Event action as it happens. Click through to read the £50,000 Super High Roller report or the UKIPT Main Event wrap. Follow the @PokerStarsBlog Twitter account to keep up-to-date with all the EPT action and check out the EPTLive webcast. Rick Dacey is a staff writer for the PokerStars Blog.
about 5 hours ago
Bonus Comp dollars remain in play for October in the BorgataPoker Room.We've split the month in half to earn comp dollars through regular play at the Borgata’s cash tables.First up is the already underway period of Oct. 1-15. Then player...
Bonus Comp dollars remain in play for October in the BorgataPoker Room.We've split the month in half to earn comp dollars through regular play at the Borgata’s cash tables.First up is the already underway period of Oct. 1-15. Then players can start earning comp dollars again from Oct. 16 -31.Comp dollars can be earned at the following No Limit Hold'em and Pot Limit Omaha games.$2-$4 $3-$6$4-$8 $5-$10$6-$12 $7.50-$15$10-$20 $20-$40 $1-$2 $2-$5$5-$10Play a minimum of 30 hours during the Oct, 1-15 and Oct. 16-31 periods and earn $25 BONUS COMP DOLLARS for each time - or -Play a minimum of 50 hours and earn $40 BONUS COMP DOLLARSBonus comp dollars can be redeemed for food, drink and entertainment at Borgata.
about 5 hours ago
The EPT Quote Board is back! It's likely you never knew it was away, but nevertheless it's here again. We pick some choice quotes and some lovely little links for you to peruse. "I was looking for someone to go see a play with me, The C...
The EPT Quote Board is back! It's likely you never knew it was away, but nevertheless it's here again. We pick some choice quotes and some lovely little links for you to peruse. "I was looking for someone to go see a play with me, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time." - The unconventional route Vanessa Selbst took to win the UKIPT High Roller for £67,499. "No one was lost from that table." - EPT Tournament Director Toby Stone to at-risk bubble boy Steven Lewzey in the Main Event. Toby Stone "I guess we just go out and make some party!" - Martin Finger after winning the EPT10 Super High Roller for £821,000 "There's a saying that the market can stay irrational for longer than you have wealth. It can outrun you. It's so true. It happens quickly. There's a couple of warning signs. It's like an earthquake. There's a tremor and boom." - Super High Roller Bill Perkins on super high rolling in the investment world. "I like that they've sped up, too. They were notoriously slow." - Team PokerStars Pro Daniel Negreanu on 'ze Germans' Daniel Negreanu, on the lookout for Germans "I don't like the architecture, I don't like too many people. I don't like the roads where you just sit in a jam instead of going fast. I have a fast car and I like to drive fast." - Marcin Horecki isn't a fan of slow coaches, either. "Sweet jesus. Dream final table. Everything went my way. Can't think straight right now. Thanks for all the support and messages ya legends." - UKIPT London champion - and thoroughly nice chap - Robbie Bull after his £113,405 win. "I think I Googled 'cute girl' and that was one of the ones I liked. I think it's just a random girl. Maybe I should source the photographer or modelling agency." - EPTLive contributor David Yan telling us about his PokerStars avatar. David "MissOracle" Yan "I guess so. It's been going so well that I can't do anything else." - WCOOP Player of the Series Yngve 'Sykoen' Steen when asked if he was a professional poker player. I was nervous at beginning ,when I sat down then realize I am the best at table,no more nervous !!!— kuo hui chen (@kittykuopoker) October 7, 2013 Click here to follow the EPT Main Event action as it happens. Click through to read the £50,000 Super High Roller report or the UKIPT Main Event wrap. Follow the @PokerStarsBlog Twitter account to keep up-to-date with all the EPT action and check out the EPTLive webcast. Rick Dacey is a staff writer for the PokerStars Blog.
about 5 hours ago
Want to skip the Shootout Tournament first round in #Zynga #Poker and get ahead of the competition? http://zynga.tm/b04Q
Want to skip the Shootout Tournament first round in #Zynga #Poker and get ahead of the competition? http://zynga.tm/b04Q
about 6 hours ago
A proud member of Team PokerStars Pro since 2007 Akkari has worked on and off the felt in his home country to make poker something that isn't over at the last showdown. ESPN commentator, editor of the poker magazine Flop and leader of a ...
A proud member of Team PokerStars Pro since 2007 Akkari has worked on and off the felt in his home country to make poker something that isn't over at the last showdown. ESPN commentator, editor of the poker magazine Flop and leader of a local poker team, the 39-year-old from Sao Paulo now moves around the country sharing his vision of the future of poker -- and the way the game can be used to fight against prejudice and social inequality. In London for the ongoing EPT Main Event, Akkari sat down with PokerListings Italy's Giovanni Angioni to talk about his vision and some controversial posts recently published on his personal blog. PokerListings: I know you are married and you care a lot about your family so, I'll start with this: did you bring them with you in London? André Akkari: No, I didn’t. My daughters are in school and they cannot travel. PL: How many daughters do you have? Brazil's second WSOP bracelet winner.   AA: Two. No, wait … three. I have two daughters and one dog. But the dog counts as a third daughter to me. PL: So – you came here to London leaving a wife, two daughters and a dog at home. I wonder how do they like the life you have as a player? AA: If I’d tell you that they like it, I would tell you a lie. Let’s say that they don’t hate it. They know it’s my job, they know that I do it for me and for them. Traveling around is part of the deal and poker changed our lives a lot over the last few years. We've got a lot from it, so sometimes we have to be ready to give something back. PL: How about you, then? Do you like this lifestyle? AA: I get the chance to travel around the world and I try to get all the best of it. I like visiting new cities, going to museums, having some fun with friends … and then go back as soon as possible to my family. PL: Which is in Brazil -- to many one of the top future markets for the poker world. How is it to be a player there? AA: It is getting better. Together with some other people I have been working hard for years to put poker in a good spot in Brazil. Now we are starting to see the effects of our work. People finally respect the game and my profession. PL: So when you say your job is to play poker … everyone is fine with it? AA: Almost. There you get a 50/50 situation. Fifty per cent of people will be happy and congratulate you while the other 50% will take you as an addicted gambler. When Ronaldo speaks, Brazil listens.   PL: How about when you're not in Brazil then? Does it get any better? AA: When you start moving around the world you start seeing how differently people react to it. Here in London, it was amazing. When I told the guy at customs that I was a professional poker player here to play at the EPT, the guy started telling me how much he loved poker and how he wished he was good enough at poker to leave his job. This was really special. PL: Now that Ronaldo signed with PokerStars – this should work to make poker more popular back home, right? AA: Oh, that was great. Ronaldo is the most famous celebrity in Brazil. If he says he is into something … well, that cannot be a bad thing. People always easily accept everything that he does. The fact that now he joined the PokerStars SportStars team is a real milestone for poker in Brazil. PL: Speaking of Brazil, I need to get to a point – which I think is probably one of the most serious and sensitive ones I have ever touched on in a poker interview. I saw a few weeks ago you wrote a post on your blog about black people playing poker… AA: … oh, yes … that one … PL: …which you used for discussing the very low number of black poker players in your country. Would you mind helping me to understand your message better? AA: In Brazil we have lived in the illusion of not being a racist country. The face of Brazilian poker is a specific one.   Many of us, especially those who are white and belong to the middle class, tend to say that Brazil is not a racist country - but the truth is that it is not like this. PL: Is it
about 6 hours ago