Raising Arizona

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Trailer for Carjack the Movie. Jeff Foxworthy narrates this Southern tale that is a cross between RAISING ARIZONA and NAPOLEON DYNAMITE with a Southern twist. Our story follows Bill Crackerjack Bailey IV (CJ), a lovable loser who is ski...
Trailer for Carjack the Movie. Jeff Foxworthy narrates this Southern tale that is a cross between RAISING ARIZONA and NAPOLEON DYNAMITE with a Southern twist. Our story follows Bill Crackerjack Bailey IV (CJ), a lovable loser who is skilled in avoiding the responsibilities of manhood. His residence of choice is a trailer. His entrepreneurial endeavors include collecting Dinky Baby Dolls to sell online. And the only diamond that he gets near is not on the finger of his live-in girlfriend, Sherry. It is, instead, the home to CJs drug of choice and the last bastion of athletic play for middle-aged men: softball. But when Sherry learns shes pregnant and moves out to prod CJ into action, the root of CJs artful dodging is unearthed. Its a leak in the Bailey gene pool- a generational curse in which a Bailey man leaves as soon as a baby is in the picture. Faced with losing his true love or confronting the curse and his impending fatherhood, CJ does what any responsible man would do- play ballwait!that is, any man who has not been booted out of his city softball league like CJ. Desperate to maintain his addiction to the game, he stumbles into the comical world of church league softball, where men struggle with being lovers or fighters on the field. In this most unlikely of places, CJ meets a whimsical Obi-wan-Kenobi character, who has faced the curse and broken it. With Sherrys delivery date drawing close, CJ must face two looming questions- will he stay or will he go? And if he chooses to stay, how will he break the curse? Filed Under: Crackerjack the Movie Tags: Comedy, Featurette, Wes Murphy, Jeff Foxworthy
about 14 hours ago
The COEN BROTHERS (JOEL, born November 29, 1954, and ETHAN, born September 21, 1957) are terrified by chaos, but they can’t stop provoking it. In movie after movie, a character with a safe routine takes a step toward chaos — and fi...
The COEN BROTHERS (JOEL, born November 29, 1954, and ETHAN, born September 21, 1957) are terrified by chaos, but they can’t stop provoking it. In movie after movie, a character with a safe routine takes a step toward chaos — and finds his world blasted by tornadoes of fate. Their protagonists invite chaos by wanting more than they’re given: they plot crimes (Blood Simple, Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing, O Brother, Where Art Thou); engage too deeply with the demons in their heads (Barton Fink); seek justice in an unjust world (The Big Lebowski, No Country for Old Men); ask questions too large for the small sureties of law and religion (Fargo, A Serious Man); or obsess over the pitiful transience of the human container (The Man Who Wasn’t There). The Coens’ fear of and obsession with chaos, combined with a style that has seldom been less than hyper-controlled, gives conflict and coherence to portraits of mundane disaster that might otherwise appear (and to some do appear) merely clinical, even contemptuous of the human lot. Existential security, the deliverance from earthly chaos and meaningless, may be the most desperate and ancient of human wishes. That’s why the tornado that bears down in the final shot of A Serious Man (a real tornado, by the way) may be the most resonant and terrifying image in any Coen film. Upon it, we are left hanging. *** On his or her birthday, HiLobrow irregularly pays tribute to one of our high-, low-, no-, or hilobrow heroes. Born the same date as Joel Coen: Madeleine L’Engle, Willie Morris. Born the same date as Ethan Coen: Drew Friedman, H.G. Wells, Leonard Cohen, Bill Murray. READ MORE about members of the Original Generation X (1954–63).
4 days ago
I experience my flaws like grains of sand or loose teeth. They bother me and I worry at them absently, out of habit, but over time they’ve become familiar landmarks. Even though I keep wanting to change them, in some way they’...
I experience my flaws like grains of sand or loose teeth. They bother me and I worry at them absently, out of habit, but over time they’ve become familiar landmarks. Even though I keep wanting to change them, in some way they’re as much a part of how I understand myself as the qualities I like best. In the “poetry issue” of the zine Mad Cow, which Gutter comics editor Carol Borden and I co-edited in university, we took a poem entitled ‘Loneliness’ by Emma LaRocque and turned it into a kind of Mad Lib: Ah [Loneliness] How would I know Who I am Without you? Through the years we’ve filled in that blank with a wide variety of words including Therapy, Bitterness, and one of my personal favorites, Nametag. It sounds like another joke, but in all earnestness it works if you fill it in with Flaws. I feel like there’s a lesson in a thousand quirky movies that I, in my struggles to do my absolute best at all times, never quite seem to learn: our limitations don’t make us less lovable. They may drive us crazy and make us more irritating, but being flawed is something we all share. We’re all good at this and suck at that. It’s one of the roots of compassion. It’s also why I’m fond of movies like Raising Arizona or Run Fatboy Run.  The Coen Brothers‘ 1987 comedy, Raising Arizona, stars Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter as Hi and Ed, a criminal and a police officer who fall in love and get married but can’t have children. They also can’t adopt due to Hi’s criminal record, so they decide to kidnap one of a set of quintuplets they hear about in the news, contending that five is too many babies to pay good attention to and his parents won’t really miss one. Many, many things go wrong with this plan, but through it all Hi and Ed struggle to do the best thing for Junior, including sneaking him back home when they realize they got it wrong. Run Fatboy Run stars Simon Pegg as Dennis Doyle, who leaves his pregnant fiancée at the altar and literally runs away down the street. When her new boyfriend brags about a marathon he’s running, Dennis decides to prove he’s not a loser by running it too. The race is full and requires him to enter on behalf of a charity so he attempts to sign up in a variety of underhanded ways, eventually succeeds, and then ends up in a physical fight with the boyfriend during the race. They both get injured, but Dennis refuses to give up and keeps limping along for hours toward the finish line. Hi, Ed and Dennis are examples of deeply flawed characters who become endearing, and who you end up rooting for and caring about in spite of the terrible choices they make. Protagonists can still end up being sympathetic and lovable even if they do things that are kind of awful. There’s something profoundly relatable about trying but failing to do something good, or doing something that seems like a good idea at the time, or just plain screwing up your life. We don’t have to become perfect, we just have to be willing to try and learn and try again. I have an acquaintance who periodically comments on how good I am at everything, which sounds like it should be a compliment but always seems to contain an edge of criticism. Once I gave her a shortlist of things I’m not good at: hockey, extemporaneous public speaking, resisting temptation. Her response was to snort and say “Those aren’t real things. You’re just saying that to make the rest of us feel better.” I can’t say I see how hockey is any less real than the things I’ve learned to do, like quilting or carpentry. I still have a visceral memory of shame when one of the bigger boys in grade school tricked me into passing the puck to him by calling my name even though he wasn’t on my team. Of course that was more about him being a bully, which in retrospect was more about his father being an abusive alcoholic, than a
6 days ago
In this installment, we are going to examine some ways to rivet the scholarship committee’s attention and set yourself apart from the other applicants who have made it as far along in the process as you have. This is actually an ea...
In this installment, we are going to examine some ways to rivet the scholarship committee’s attention and set yourself apart from the other applicants who have made it as far along in the process as you have. This is actually an easier process than you may think. Yet, I imagine a lot of applicants fall into the trap of over analysis and try to do or say what they believe the committee wants to hear rather than hewing to their own authenticity, which in a case of extremely circular reasoning (a la Raising Arizona) is what the committee really wants to hear. Make Yourself Heard I said it in the previous post, and I will say it again here: the name of the game is meshing your accomplishments, abilities and personality with the scholarship criteria. A typical mistake that applicants make is that they throw out everything they’ve got that makes them special and hopes the committee will sift through their laundry list to find something that fits the organization or the reason the scholarship is being offered. The thing is, though, that this is not the committee’s job. It’s your job. You must acknowledge the basic premises of the scholarship and the organization offering it in your application materials. Vomiting up everything you have or have done into a generic puddle of accomplishments does not set you apart and get you notice. It makes you just like everyone else. Among the first things you want to address in your application materials and essay is an acknowledgement of the foundation, business or organization that is offering the scholarship and a statement of your belief in what they do. The likelihood of an organization giving a scholarship to a candidate who expresses viewpoints antithetical to its purpose or mission is extremely small. The National Rifle Association will not give a scholarship to an gun control activist; the Democratic National Committee is not handing out money to young Republicans; and Tall People International is not paying for short people’s tuition (or vice versa). That’s just the way it is. So, very early on in your essay and materials, let the committee know that you are aware of your audience, what they do and that you agree with them (even if you don’t; you’ll just have to be creative if you want their money). One helpful way to think of it is that the recipients of scholarships become, essentially, spokespeople for the awarding organization — like Jared from Subway. The foundation will want to know that you are firmly on their bandwagon, waving their flag and heralding the good deeds of the business or organization. In fact, many scholarships are tailored to those students that the organization believes will have the most impact on behalf of the organization’s goals. The lucrative ($5,000 annually) National Potato Council scholarship is one such example. The award goes to a student who is doing work that “directly enhances the potato industry.” So, when you are working on the application, be sure that you pay attention to the stated purpose of the scholarship itself and address how you will help to fulfill that purpose. Paying attention to these details will help move you forward in the process. Many applicants who do nothing but create a scholarship mill at the dining room table, mailing off generic applications with generic essays are putting in a lot of work and effort (but clearly not enough) for, essentially, nothing. Acknowledging the organization and the reason for its existence, and your belief in it, will help convince the scholarship committee that you are applying for reasons more noble than money (for love and advancement of the lowly potato, e.g.), even if you are solely motivated by lucre. Tailoring your application materials and essay toward the ultimate purpose of the scholarship itself will help to demonstrate to the committee that you will be an excellent addition to the organization’s “team”
10 days ago
LOUISVILLE — “2nd Serve” – a romantic comedy set in the world of local, club tennis, starring Josh Hopkins of “Cougar Town,” Cameron Monaghan of TV’s “Shameless” and “Click” and Alexie Gilmore of “World’s Greatest Dad” and “Grey’s ...
LOUISVILLE — “2nd Serve” – a romantic comedy set in the world of local, club tennis, starring Josh Hopkins of “Cougar Town,” Cameron Monaghan of TV’s “Shameless” and “Click” and Alexie Gilmore of “World’s Greatest Dad” and “Grey’s Anatomy” – is now available for purchase on DVD and for digital download. “2nd Serve” is available for purchase on Amazon.com here: http://www.amazon.com/2nd-Serve-Hopkins/dp/B00CQRNLAQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1378146972&sr=8-1&keywords=2nd+Serve as well as at Blockbuster here: http://www.blockbuster.com/browse/catalog/movieDetails/589479, at Best Buy here: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/2nd-Serve—DVD/21539039.p?id=2714745&skuId=21539039, at Kmart here: http://entertainment.kmart.com/2nd-serve/818768010632, and Family Video here: http://www.familyvideo.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=419844/. Written by USPTA tennis pro James Markert of Louisville, Kentucky and produced by Gill Holland, also of Louisville, and Jay Thames of 77 Films, “2nd Serve” is a “snobs vs. slobs” film that is part “Caddyshack” part “Dodgeball” part “Wimbledon” and all heart. The movie follows tennis pro Owen Match (Hopkins) who gets fired from his cushy country club gig at the affluent Fountain Club and is forced to take a job at the gritty public courts of the Derby City Rec Center. Along with his new co-workers, a ragtag group of tennis goofs, their boss, the strong-willed single mother club manager Sherry (Gilmore) and her son Jake (Monaghan), a goth teenager with a tennis crush, Owen might just have one last shot at redemption, for him and everyone else. As Owen begins to win over his colleagues, mend his broken relationships, and help Jake improve his serve, he develops a romantic connection with Sherry — despite her insistence that she doesn’t date tennis pros. Just when things start to look up, Owen’s former boss and tennis nemesis Charles (Dash Mihok) challenge the Derby Club to a showdown at the annual Combo Cup tennis tournament. As he leads his team of oddballs, Owen learns the most valuable lesson of all – whether you are on the court or off – everyone deserves a “second serve.” “There really aren’t many movies that have tennis as a main theme and that alone makes ’2nd Serve’ so unique,” said Holland. “’2nd Serve’ has a feel of a being tennis version of ‘Caddyshack,’ and you can’t help but smile and laugh throughout the movie.” “’2nd Serve’ is a movie with a huge heart and, it’s a crowd pleaser,” said Thames. “It’s a must-see for anyone who has played tennis, whether at a private club or a public facility or taught tennis in any regard, or simply anyone who loves an endearing feel-good movie.” “2nd Serve” also stars Kevin Sussman (Big Bang Theory, Burn After Reading, Hitch), Guillermo Diaz (Weeds, The Terminal, Half Baked), Sam McMurray (Raising Arizona, Christmas Vacation, LA Story) and Mihok (Silver Linings Playbook, The Day After Tomorrow, I Am Legend). The movie premiered at the Woodstock Film Festival in New York and the AMFM Film Festival in Palm Springs. It was filmed in Louisville, primarily at the Louisville Boat Club and the Jewish Community Center. Fans can follow “2nd Serve” on Facebook and follow the movie on Twitter at @2ndServeMovie “2nd Serve” – the movie
14 days ago
I am here for but a short time, speaking at the university, but here is what comes to mind: 1. Folk singer: Is that what he is?  Bringing it All Back Home remains my favorite Dylan album, of many candidates. 2. Rock music: The Replacemen...
I am here for but a short time, speaking at the university, but here is what comes to mind: 1. Folk singer: Is that what he is?  Bringing it All Back Home remains my favorite Dylan album, of many candidates. 2. Rock music: The Replacements were pretty awesome for a short while.  The Artist Formerly Known as Prince has an impressive body of work, with Sign of the Times as my favorite or maybe Dirty Mind, though when viewed as a whole I find the corpus of work rather numbing and even somewhat off-putting.  Bob Mould I like but do not love, the peaks are too low. 3. Jazz: The Bad Plus come to mind. 4. Writer: Must I go with F. Scott Fitzgerald?  I don’t like his work very much, so Ole Rolvaag is my choice. 5. Coen Brothers movie: Raising Arizona or Fargo.   The more serious ones strike me as too grim. 6. Director: George Roy Hill, how about A Little Romance? 7. Columnist: The underrated Thomas Friedman, who ought to be considered one of the world’s leading conservative columnists but is not. 8. Scientist: Norman Borlaug.  I hope you all know who he is by now. 9. Advice columnist: Ann Landers, most of the time she was right, much better and sharper than her sister Dear Abby, plus she coined better phrases. What else? Garrison Keillor belongs somewhere, even though he isn’t funny.  Thorstein Veblen is often unreadable but on status competition, and its Darwinian roots, he was way ahead of his time. Overall this is a very strong state, and on top of that I feel I am missing some significant contributors with this list.  Are there painters or sculptors of note from Minnesota?  I can’t think of any.
18 days ago
You gotta forgive me if you stalk, I mean follow, my fb or insta, these photos have been seen there and most of what I'm about to say, too. So forgive the lack of variety. I am in Vegas. Wednesday night was the usual rough part that a ...
You gotta forgive me if you stalk, I mean follow, my fb or insta, these photos have been seen there and most of what I'm about to say, too. So forgive the lack of variety. I am in Vegas. Wednesday night was the usual rough part that a tri-mom has to endure, hugging Kainoa bye till Monday. It was better than usual though, I knew him and his dad had big plans to go to the fair and would most likely have a good father-son weekend. Maybe that is also one of the best parts of this trip so far too, I'm getting way better at finding happiness when Kainoa enjoys time with his dad, rather than feeling sorry for myself missing him. But I still wish it were possible to take Kainoa to every single race, all over the world!Landed in Vegas at 7am Thursday morning. It was the absolute most tired my eyes have ever been, ever. Red eye flights should be illegal in my life (after Sunday that is, as I am on the 1:55am home). Pretty much Thursday was a blur, still not even sure how I got my bike built up. Riding late afternoon was gorgeous, for a desert that is. The bike course reminds me so much of that movie, "Raising Arizona". A desert with nothing around, just visions of Nicholas Cage in a lawn chair like it's 1980's. Barely any people, only one hoochy bar, (that I saw), with a sign that said, "Some nice looking women, just some". It was the most hilarious sign I ever saw, wonder what the other women look like?? As for the big city, that will happen after the finish line... The ride woke my body up a little but I still did not feel like a race was on the horizon. This place is just so different from any race location I have ever been. At the moment I was considering it a good thing to still feel so relaxed on a race-week-Thursday. You know, the body has swam, biked, and ran countless miles, it's not like Sunday will come as any shock to the system. I just want my head to get fired up, and I know it will because opportunity in life always has a way of making me come alive...and start lines are always opportunity lines...This is the swim course, see it? It's hiding down in the desert valley...This morning Devonee (our friend from Hawaii that moved to Vegas) invited us to swim with the Masters squad she coaches. Finally, finally, finally, I felt more "swimmery" than floaty. It has been a pain in my @$$ finding swim rhythm after Mont Tremblant. Or maybe I have just been struggling to wake up early, but 5:30 this morning I was rarin' to go. After so many races this season that is one thing I am convinced of, the body always finds a way to go a little more even after you think it's tapped out. Truly, few ever actually go to the limits quitting long before, and just maybe you have to toe that edge to know just what it takes. That said, 9 hours of sleep last night played a big role in coming back to life.After the swim I road a tiny bit more, then laced up the shoes and ran through the desert for a mile or 2. Now I feel even more ready. The best part though, was this....An interview! It was awesome, by far the best interview I have done in a LONG time. Most always getting an interview as a pro means you are one to watch. This one was earned as being ranked last (or nearly last) on the start list of the 70.3 World Championships! I was laughing, the men asking questions were laughing, I was honest as heck, and you know what?? I am proud too! 250 or so pro women, they only take like 35 of us, that means there might be 200 pro girls that want to be on the start line, yet I am here. And so, with pride this one is for Hawaii, small town girl from a Big Island, here we go, taking Vegas on a gamble! When I am 80 years old, in a rocking chair sipping some green tea, I can look back on this race knowing it was part of a big lesson on a journey in my life as a professional triathlete, and what a trip this entire hope turned dream has become for me...Alright, that's all I got for now. And not that you really want to hear anything
19 days ago
RT @RAKmagazine: If you've ever watched a child perform, you'll relate to this Sept essay, "An Unexpected Finale." @…
RT @RAKmagazine: If you've ever watched a child perform, you'll relate to this Sept essay, "An Unexpected Finale." @…
22 days ago
For starters the Arizona Fall League is usually a bit of a showcase for talents who will play in the Majors in the very near future. The level of competition is fairly high and can be a good test for prospects. However, prospects can't b...
For starters the Arizona Fall League is usually a bit of a showcase for talents who will play in the Majors in the very near future. The level of competition is fairly high and can be a good test for prospects. However, prospects can't be Dominican or Venezuelan or any other country with a fall league of their own. So, it's basically all Americans. Teams often use AFL as a last chance to evaluate guys who may need to be added to 40-man rosters to protect them from the Rule 5 draft. However, teams are required to supply 6-8 players, and many teams don't have 7-8 top prospects they can send, and teams can't be all Starters and Outfielders, so teams often end up sending a few Pitchers and maybe a position player or two just to fill out the roster. The Phillies supply players to the Phoenix Javelinas along with the Royals, Astros, Mariners and Padres. This year the Phillies are sending 3 guys with looming Rule 5 eligibility in Aaron Altherr, Kelly Dugan and Cameron Rupp. Also announced as going is Kenny Giles (though he doesn't appear on the actual Javelina's roster yet), the reason for sending Giles is he missed so much of the regular season to injury that he really just needs the appearances. The Phillies then supply a good bit of the bullpen with new bullpen convert Austin Wright, who will spend the fall attempting to find home plate, while trying to miss more bats. Kyle Simon, the 6'6" righty acquired in the Thome trade will also make the trip and the Phillies contingent gets rounded out by 6'5" swingman Mike Nesseth. Nesseth has started and relieved. Thereare 4 known starters on the Javelinas roster: Brandon Maurer, Danny Hultzen, Jason Adam, Angel Baez and another swingman in Noel Arguelles. So, I'm not sure which role Nesseth will fill. The big names on this team are Hultzen, Maurer, Delino DeShields and Cory Spangenberg. I imagine Altherr and Dugan will see plenty of time in the OF and DH roles. Rupp though is going to have a tougher time as Jake Lowery and Austin Hedges might be more highly regarded prospects. That said, the AFL teams rotate guys well and everyone gets pretty equal time to shine.
29 days ago
Men
Every Tuesday, I review the newest Blu-ray releases and let you know whether they’re worth buying, renting or skipping, along with a breakdown of the included extras. If you see something you like, click on the cover art to purchase the ...
Every Tuesday, I review the newest Blu-ray releases and let you know whether they’re worth buying, renting or skipping, along with a breakdown of the included extras. If you see something you like, click on the cover art to purchase the Blu-ray from Amazon, and be sure to share each week’s column on Facebook and Twitter with your friends. “The Great Gatsby” WHAT: Bond salesman Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire) gets pulled into the extravagant world of Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio) when he rents a small house on Long Island next to the reclusive millionaire’s lavish mansion. But Gatsby has ulterior motives for befriending Nick – he’s in love with his cousin, Daisy (Carey Mulligan), who’s currently trapped in a loveless marriage with wealthy socialite Tom Buchanan (Joel Edgerton). WHY: If you ever wondered what a bad movie starring good actors looks like, then you’ll want to check out this disastrous adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby.” Though Warner Bros. tried to put a positive spin on the film’s delay, it’s pretty clear why they decided not to release it during awards season like originally planned: it’s a boring mess. The only thing worse than a dull movie is one that tries to disguise it with razzle-dazzle, and director Baz Luhrman’s kitschy vision of the Roaring 20s is so oversaturated in style and off-the-wall choices (like the use of a contemporary, mostly hip-hop soundtrack) that he completely ignores the many nuances of Fitzgerald’s novel. The whole thing is executed so poorly that I came up with a drinking game just to keep myself entertained. Take a sip every time DiCaprio says “old sport,” and take a shot every time someone slicks back their hair. You’ll be plastered within the hour, but at least the film will be a lot easier to watch. EXTRAS: Sadly, there’s no audio commentary by director Baz Luhrmann, but there are a number of featurettes on things like pre-production, costume design and the soundtrack, as well as on-set video diaries by Tobey Maguire, an in-depth look at five sequences and some deleted scenes. FINAL VERDICT: SKIP “Pain & Gain” WHAT: Based on an unbelievably true story, physical trainer Daniel Lugo (Mark Wahlberg) enlists the help of fellow bodybuilder Adrian Doorbal (Anthony Mackie) and recently paroled born-again Christian Paul Doyle (Dwayne Johnson) to kidnap a Miami businessman (Tony Shaloub) and force him to sign over all his assets. WHY: After three “Transformers” films, it’s nice to see Michael Bay challenging himself with something on a much smaller scale – one that doesn’t involve blowing shit up every 10 minutes – although it may not necessarily look like it due to the director’s trademark ramped-up style. Bay’s movies can be pretty grueling to watch at times between the relentless high energy intensity and overlong runtimes, and “Pain & Gain” is no exception. But whereas a film like “Bad Boys II” had the added annoyance level of Martin Lawrence (to the point that it gave me a headache), this movie actually benefits from its cast. Wahlberg, Johnson and Mackie all deliver enjoyable performances as the amateur criminals, and though no amount charm makes them come across any less idiotic, that’s part of the fun. “Pain & Gain” is a lot like “Raising Arizona” in many respects – if that film was shot up with a potent cocktail of steroids and speed – and though it’s fairly entertaining at times, it eventually becomes too crazy for its own good. EXTRAS: Surprisingly, there’s no bonus material available. Nothing, nada, zilch. FINAL VERDICT: RENT “Sons of Anarchy: Season Five” WHAT: After the fallout of last season, Jax (Charlie Hunnam) has officially taken over as club president, but that hasn’t stopped a debilitated Clay (Ron Perlman) from trying to claw his way back to the top. Meanwhile, the Sons gain a new enemy in Oakland crime boss Damon Pope (Harold Perrineau), although it’s the schism within the club that proves to be
29 days ago