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textured planter project : just cover a pot with clay, stamp in shapes with the bottom of a marker, and paint! i was just looking at my old terracotta pots, wondering how i could make them prettier...pom-pom pumpkins : with a name like t...
textured planter project : just cover a pot with clay, stamp in shapes with the bottom of a marker, and paint! i was just looking at my old terracotta pots, wondering how i could make them prettier...pom-pom pumpkins : with a name like that, how could they not be cute?rainbow cake slice : who wouldn't want a crocheted piece of cake for their bday?cat toy jar : we are in need of a toy storage solution and this is perfect! methinks i'll try this in gold.can you tell i miss pinterest? i had to close my account. boring story. thank you for letting me use this space for a pinboard. i'm challenging myself to make three out of four of these. we shall see.=)
about 3 hours ago
Making butternut squash in a slow cooker is ridiculously easy. I am blogging about it because there was a time when I didn’t know about it and figured there might be some of you who don’t know either. Tip one… Use a sha...
Making butternut squash in a slow cooker is ridiculously easy. I am blogging about it because there was a time when I didn’t know about it and figured there might be some of you who don’t know either. Tip one… Use a sharp knife. It’s not easy cutting a butternut squash in half (lengthwise) unless you have a sharp knife. Here’s the one I’ve been using for about 9 years.  Tip two… It appears that raw butternut squash can cause an allergic reaction on some people’s skin, mine included. I was peeling and chopping butternut squash one time for chili and my bare hands, of course, were being used in handling it. About a half hour post-kitchen time my hands felt weird and looked kind of shiny, like they had a papaya enzyme mask on them or something. The skin felt tight and weird. After googling, it appears it’s an allergic (usually harmless, if not annoying) reaction to handling butternut squash. As a result, I don’t peel and chop it anymore. I cut it in half for minimal skin exposure, and toss it in the slow cooker. And, I wash my hands well after that. Butternut Squash in my slow cooker. Here’s how you cook butternut squash in a slow cooker. Take a butternut squash and slice it lengthwise down the middle. Put it in your slow cooker (I usually use a 6 quart or 7 quart size), skin side down. Cover the slow cooker. Cook on LOW for 6 to 8 hours or HIGH for 4 to 6 hours. Scoop out seeds and discard. Scoop out flesh, put in a bowl, add seasoning and grass fed butter (if desired). Smash it up. Done! Smashed butternut squash Eat as is, add to soups, serve as a side with a snazzy sauce on it, or spread on paleo bread.Similar Posts: Easy Acorn Squash in the Slow Cooker Recipe Slow Cooker Caramelized Onions How to Cook Sweet Potatoes or Yams in a Slow Cooker Paleo Recipe: Minimalist (aka Easiest) Slow Cooker Chicken 11-Minute Sweet Potato Cinnamon Beef Stew (Slow Cooker)
about 5 hours ago
Magnesium is probably on your health radar already, but like a lot of micronutrients, you may hear it referenced without understanding precisely what it does, or why. Magnesium is one of the main electrolytes in coconut water and commerc...
Magnesium is probably on your health radar already, but like a lot of micronutrients, you may hear it referenced without understanding precisely what it does, or why. Magnesium is one of the main electrolytes in coconut water and commercial sports drinks. We know that it helps with hydration, but aside from this, what is magnesium, and why is it important? Magnesium is a cation, s a positively charged ion that exists in the body and is active in more than 300 enzymatic systems (1). It plays a role in protein synthesis, glucose regulation, cell membrane transport, and muscle and nerve function. Over half of the magnesium in the human body exists in bone matrix, so not surprisingly, magnesium is particularly important in maintaining bone health. Most of the remaining magnesium resides in muscles and soft tissues (2). Magnesium works in concert with calcium to help regulate muscle contraction and blood clotting; while calcium promotes contraction, magnesium promotes relaxation.People with magnesium deficiencies can develop hypertension, because the walls of arteries and capillaries tend to constrict. For this reason, magnesium is critical to heart function and to maintaining healthy blood pressure. There are typically only a a few ounces of magnesium in the body (0.05% of body weight), but that small amount is important. Serious magnesium deficiencies can result in hypertension, impaired functioning of the central nervous system, and even tetanus. These kinds of deficiencies are rare, since our kidneys tend to regulate the amount of magnesium we excrete in our urine. They usually present themselves either with certain types of diseases (such as kidney or bowel disease) or in cases of alcohol abuse, protein malnutrition, or prolonged vomiting and diarrhea (3). People who abuse diuretics and those with anorexia can become deficient as well. While full blown deficiency may be unlikely among people who don’t have complicating health factors, it’s still important to put dietary magnesium on your radar. When magnesium isn’t consumed in adequate amounts, magnesium in bones will serve as a reservoir from which the body draws, which may not be ideal for bone health (4,5). Meanwhile, low serum and tissue levels of magnesium may be associated with a number of common health complaints, such as migraine headaches (6), hypertension, insomnia, and irritability. Magnesium supplementation may also be helpful to people who suffer from uncomfortable or prolonged PMS (7), and it’s sometimes recommended in the management of cardiac conditions. Of course, the therapeutic potential of magnesium that interests me most has to do with gut health–my personal area of fascination! In addition to easing anxiety and helping to relax muscles, magnesium has a laxative effect, and it tends to be particularly helpful in easing chronic constipation. (If you’ve ever noticed that coconut water helps with your elimination, this is part of the reason why!) If you suffer from IBS-C (the type of irritable bowel syndrome that tends to cause constipation) or any other type of chronic constipation, supplemental magnesium may be tremendously helpful for you. The recommended daily allowance of magnesium for men ages 19-30 is 400 mg/day, and 420 mg/day for men 31+. For women, it’s 310 mg/day between the ages of 19 and 30, and 320 mg/day for women ages 31+. Plant based eaters have an advantage in meeting magnesium needs, because many of the best sources of the mineral are plant foods. They include almonds spinach cashews soy milk tofu black beans edamame wheat avocados bananas brown rice pinto beans cashews Brazil nuts millet apricots Absorption of magnesium depends on an acidic stomach environment. People with histories of digestive illness often have a hard time absorbing this vital nutrient, as do people with damaged gut linings. Supplemental magnesium can be very helpful in these cases. It can also help folks with constipation, an
about 18 hours ago
Cream of Zucchini Soup As seen in Jennifer Cornbleet's Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People  Ingredients: •½ cup water •1 zucchini, chopped with our ceramic knives (about 1 cup) •1 stalk celery, chopped •1 tablespoon lemon juice (use ou...
Cream of Zucchini Soup As seen in Jennifer Cornbleet's Raw Food Made Easy for 1 or 2 People  Ingredients: •½ cup water •1 zucchini, chopped with our ceramic knives (about 1 cup) •1 stalk celery, chopped •1 tablespoon lemon juice (use our citrus juicer for the most juice!) •1 teaspoon mellow white miso •½ teaspoon crushed garlic (1 clove - use our stainless steel garlic press for best results) •
1 day ago
the 2013 garden wasn't as well-planned as in previous years. the carrots were pulled late and there was a big old space to fill mid-june. the edamame didn't come up and time was a-ticking. (not one edamame plant came up out of do...
the 2013 garden wasn't as well-planned as in previous years. the carrots were pulled late and there was a big old space to fill mid-june. the edamame didn't come up and time was a-ticking. (not one edamame plant came up out of dozens of seeds. maybe a sign for me not to avoid soybeans too?)i knew it was late to plant watermelon but saw no harm in trying. john was so excited we were growing watermelon and checked on only those plants all summer. i had no hope for them when there wasn't a sign of fruit until august. but they kept growing, and the weather stayed pretty warm. we picked two delicious mature melons the first week of fall and have three more still on the vine!last fall i propagated an echinacea plant all over the garden. i've been happy to notice more and more looking strong and healthy, some even pushing out late blooms. me and the bees love it!so here is my happy place. squatting in the garden, rubbing the kakers. it's extra special when john comes out to watch and makes cat noises while i rub. she loves the attention, but only in the garden. try to pet her like that in the house and she'll bite. don't be fooled by the sweet demeanor!enjoy your day! xoxoxo
1 day ago
Fancy feeling like her in the hammock? Yep. Read on. When most people think magnesium they think muscle cramps or eye twitching - as this magic mineral is what helps with both these conditions, and what most people walk into the health f...
Fancy feeling like her in the hammock? Yep. Read on. When most people think magnesium they think muscle cramps or eye twitching - as this magic mineral is what helps with both these conditions, and what most people walk into the health food store asking about (that and weight loss). You might be surprised to know then that magnesium is in fact essential for the functioning of more than 300 different biochemical reactions in the body, particularly those that produce, transport, store, and utilize energy. Dr Christiane Northrup writes up that this includes:-- Protein synthesis. DNA and RNA in our cells require magnesium for cell growth and development.-- Sparking of the electrical signals that must travel throughout the miles of nerves in our bodies, including our brain, heart, and other organs.-- Normal blood pressure, vascular tone, transmission of nerve cell signals, and blood flow.-- Functioning of all nerves and muscles.-- Release and binding of adequate amounts of serotonin in the brain. (1)In short, living without adequate levels of magnesium is like trying to operate a machine with the power off. And like a machine, it's likely to malfunction.Image SourceWe need magnesium to:-- Ensure our bowels are working properly -- Support a healthy immune system-- Keep our bones strong-- Relax our muscles and improves their functioning-- Keep our heart working its best-- Regulate our blood sugar levels-- Promote normal blood pressure (not too high, not too low)-- And to help absorb calcium, whilst also balancing the two together You can imagine then that if you are deficient in magnesium, you could be experiencing anything frommuscle spasm and twitching (most common), breathlessness and heart palpitations, irritability, fatigue, trouble falling asleep, and hypersensitivity to loud noises. Neck and back pain, constipation, anxiety, loss of appetite, vomiting, nausea, migranes, blood sugar problems, and an additional 38 other issues according to The Nutrient Bible (2) are all other symptoms. What about STRESS? You bet your bottom dollar that stress and magnesium are linked, and this is what I want to focus on here. Mag is the most important mineral for coping with stress. Have a look again at that list of deficiency symptoms above... they all relate to stress in some form or another. When you are chronically stressed, you can become magnesium deficient even if you are eating magnesium-rich foods daily - due to the complex relationship between magnesium and stress which I wont go into.Physician, author, professor and nutrition expert Leo Galland writes "If you are like most people, when you are exposed to the stress of continuous loud noise, for example, you become irritable, easily fatigued and lose concentration. Your blood pressure may increase as the level of adrenaline, a stress hormone, increases in your blood. Under conditions of mental or physical stress, magnesium is released from your blood cells and goes into the blood plasma, from where it is excreted into the urine. Chronic stress depletes your body of magnesium. The more stressed you are, the greater the loss of magnesium. The lower your magnesium level to begin with, the more reactive to stress you become and the higher your level of adrenaline in stressful situations. Higher adrenaline causes greater loss of magnesium from cells. Administering magnesium as a nutritional supplement breaks this vicious cycle by raising blood magnesium levels and buffering the response to stress, building your resistance" (3)One study found the "Results of animal experiments and clinical observations indicate that both central nervous and peripheral systemic reactions to acute stress can be accentuated by magnesium deficiency and reduced by mild hypermagnesemia, respectively". (4)In lay-mans terms; if you're deficient in magnesium, your response/reaction to stress will be greater than if you have optimal magnesium levels, and more so if you have mildly high magne
1 day ago
Here's Looking At You, Stew serves 1 ~ $.65 per serving 4 tablespoons white chia seeds ($.50) 3/4 cup water 1 tablespoon agave ($.10) a few drops stevia 4 grapes ($.05) apple pieces This is Stew. Poor Stew is a bit discombobulate...
Here's Looking At You, Stew serves 1 ~ $.65 per serving 4 tablespoons white chia seeds ($.50) 3/4 cup water 1 tablespoon agave ($.10) a few drops stevia 4 grapes ($.05) apple pieces This is Stew. Poor Stew is a bit discombobulated in the mornings. But still, we like having breakfast together. Soak the chia seeds in about 3/4 cup water. Use more water for a thinner Stew. Add the agave and stevia to taste. I like Stew the best when sweet. Peel the grapes, leaving a round section for irises. Chop the apple into small pieces and arrange into a smile or frown, depending on how you feel. This bowl, which I just love, is something I found from an awesome Etsy seller ... her shop is a bit empty this morning, but she should have things relisted soon. I love the drippy glaze she use and this has become my (and Stew's) favorite dish. calories: 215 fat: 9 gr carbs: 31 gr protein: 5 gr Apple Raisin Cookies makes 24 cookies ~ $.19 each 1/2 cup buckwheat ($1.00) 1/2 cup brazil nuts ($2.00) 2 bananas ($.30) 1 apple, coarsely chopped ($.60) 1/2 cup raisins ($1.00) 3 tablespoons olive oil ($.30) 3 tablespoons agave ($.30) 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice 1 teaspoon cinnamon pinch salt These are every bit as good as a regular cookie. I found my buckwheat and brazil nuts at Nuts.com. They have an amazing selection of all sorts of goodies, including lots of raw nuts and seeds and their service is excellent. The buckwheat has to be soaked for at least a half hour, but can be soaked overnight, so plan to start that ahead of time. Once soaked, rinse the buckwheat extremely well. In a food processor fitted with an "S" blade, process the bananas until pureed. Add the buckwheat and pureed until mostly smooth. Add the brazil nuts and process until well chopped. Add the remaining ingredients and pulse until the apples and raisins are chopped up a bit and all ingredients are incorporated. Put heaping tablespoon sized mounds of batter on a lined dehydrator sheet. Press some additional raisins into the tops of the cookies, if desired. Dry for about an hour, until the tops are dry enough to flip. Flip and gently pry the cookies from the sheet. Also, a spatula can be used to turn the cookies. Dry for another few hours until dry but just slightly pliable. Use the cookies to make n'ice cream sandwiches. Just make a small batch of banana ice cream and pour into a freezer proof container to a depth of about 1/2 to 1 inch. Freeze until very firm, then cut into circles that fit inside the cookies. calories: 68 fat: 4 gr carbs: 9 gr protein: 2 gr nutritional information is for one cookie BeetLeJuice serves 1 ~ $.99 per serving 1 beet ($.69) 1/2 cucumber ($.30) 3 tablespoons lemon juice stevia to taste I vant to drink your ... beet juice. Especially if it's lemony and sweet. My granddaughter loved this, and has requested it ever since. Juice the beet and cucumber. Add lemon juice and sweeten with a bit of stevia, or your favorite sweetener. calories: 55 fat: 0 gr carbs: 12 gr protein: 2 gr Caramel Apple Pie serves 6 ~ $1.60 per serving crust 1 cup walnuts ($3.00) 1 cup raisins ($1.00) filling 5 apples ($3.00) 1/2 cup raisins ($.50) 4 tablespoons agave ($.40) 4 tablespoons lemon juice ($.40) 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice ($.10) caramel 4 tablespoons almond butter ($.80) 2 tablespoons agave ($.40) 2 tablespoons olive oil ($.20) 4 tablespoons water This may possibly be the best apple pie I've ever had. Peel and slice the apples into pieces about 1/8 in thick. In a lidded container (I used a zip lock box), toss the apples and 1/2 cup raisins with the agave, lemon juice, cinnamon, and pumpkin pie spice until well coated. Spread out on a lined dehydrator sheet and dry for about 2 hours, stirring once or twice. This isn't meant to dry the apples, but to soften them and let the flavor intensify. In a food processor fitted with the "S" blade, process the walnuts and 1 c
2 days ago
finally, a flavorful flax cracker that i'm proud to share! but i can't take even half the credit for these. thank you carmella and doctor in the kitchen for your delicious cracker inspiration!the ingredients on doctor in the kitchen's fl...
finally, a flavorful flax cracker that i'm proud to share! but i can't take even half the credit for these. thank you carmella and doctor in the kitchen for your delicious cracker inspiration!the ingredients on doctor in the kitchen's flax cracker box told me to add bragg's liquid aminos and raw apple cider vinegar to my cracker batter. carmi's blog inspired me to add vegetables to make the crackers colorful and even more nutritious. good thing i had enough sense to measure and write the recipe down, because this one is definitely a keeper.golden flax crackers2 C flax seeds2 C water1/2 red bell pepper1/2 yellow bell pepper3-4 leaves purple cabbage 1 carrot or 1/2 orange bell pepper2 ribs celery2-3 garlic cloves 2 T apple cider vinegar2 T bragg's liquid amino acid3/4 tsp onion powder3/4 tsp saltfew sprigs rosemary and thyme in a large mixing bowl, combine flax seeds and water. allow the mixture to sit for about an hour or so. the batter will be nice and gooey when it's ready.in the meantime, chop vegetables or pulse them in the food processor, making sure not to puree them. you can really use any kind of vegetable, or none at all if you want to make these quick. if you want to add veggies, 3 cups of chopped vegetables makes a nice ratio to the flax seeds. mix all ingredients until well combined. spread onto two and a half teflex sheets and dehydrate at 110 degrees for a few hours. when the top layer is dry and cracker batter corners start to pull away from the sheets, flip onto trays and dehydrate until fully dry. if you want your crackers chewier, take them out sooner. to make sure they're extra crispy, i leave mine in the dehydrator overnight.break them into pieces and you've got yourself a delicious gluten-free cracker. oh, i almost forgot to warn you - have a toothpick ready - the flax seeds will cling to your chompers for dear life! i hope you have a very happy monday and a wonderful week! xoxoxo
3 days ago
I wasn’t planning on this recipe. It happened by accident, because I’d run out of almonds and cashews and Brazil nuts and basically all of the other nuts and seeds I usually use to make homemade plant milk. (Note to self: it&...
I wasn’t planning on this recipe. It happened by accident, because I’d run out of almonds and cashews and Brazil nuts and basically all of the other nuts and seeds I usually use to make homemade plant milk. (Note to self: it’s time for a visit to the bulk bins.) I’ve used shredded coconut to make homemade coconut butter before, and I got to thinking: what if making homemade coconut milk with shredded coconut is just as easy? As it turns out, it is every bit as easy, and it’s also absolutely delicious. If you’ve got a powerful blender, you can whip up your own coconut milk in no time, and you may actually find that it’s easier than making almond milk because you don’t have to pre-soak anything. My typical formula for homemade almond milk is 4 cups water : 1 cup soaked raw almonds. Since coconut is fluffier and a bit less dense than almonds, I used a ratio of 4 cups water : 1 1/2 cups shredded, unsweetened coconut. It was perfect. If you wanted a creamier milk, you could certainly use 2 cups (I may try that next time) or skip the straining step. I don’t always strain cashew milk, but otherwise, I prefer straining homemade nut milks — I just find it to be a nicer texture. One thing I noticed as I was making this recipe and wanted to point out is that it actually took a while for things to blend up as creamily and completely as I wanted. Shredded coconut is pretty firm to begin with, and the very fine texture actually makes blending a little harder. I’m not totally sure a regular blender would work — if you do use one, be sure to blend for a good long time. You could also try soaking the coconut first (though that’s not necessary for a high speed blender). I sweetened this recipe with four pitted dates, sea salt and vanilla. You could of course use stevia, agave, maple syrup, or no sweetener at all. The coconut adds a lot of great flavor on its own. Print Quick, Easy and Delicious Homemade Coconut Milk Ingredients1 1/2 cups shredded, unsweetened coconut 4 cups water Pinch sea salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract or the seeds of 1 vanilla bean (tutorial on using fresh vanilla beans here) 4 pitted medjool datesInstructions1. Add all ingredients to a high speed blender. Begin blending on low speed, then switch to high speed. Blend for at least two minutes, or until the milk is very creamy and you no longer see pieces of shredded coconut. 2. Affix cheesecloth, a nut milk bag, or a paint bag over the mouth of a large jar or container with a rubber band. Pour the coconut milk through to strain it, collecting the pulp. 3. Keep the coconut milk in the fridge. It will last four days at least. Makes 3 1/2 - 4 cups.Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by ZipList Recipe Plugin2.2http://www.choosingraw.com/quick-easy-and-delicious-homemade-coconut-milk-bonus-recipe-for-raw-vegan-coconut-biscotti/ Of course, after I made the coconut milk, I was left with coconut pulp. Though I would imagine that this would be absolutely spectacular in place of almond pulp in the almond and pumpkin breakfast porridge I recently shared, I wanted to try something new, so I went with biscotti. Tasty, crunchy, raw vegan biscotti! Here’s how I made them. Print Raw, Vegan Coconut Biscotti Ingredients1/3 cup raw almonds 1 1/2 - 2 cups coconut pulp (from making homemade coconut milk -- your amount will vary based on how thoroughly you strained the milk, among other factors) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract or the seeds from a fresh vanilla bean (tutorial here 1 tablespoon ground flax meal 4 tablespoons coconut nectar, agave, or maple syrup 2 tablespoons coconut or almond milkInstructions1. Place the almonds in a food processor fitted with the S blade and grind well (not so well that they start turning into nut butter, but you want them to resemble flou
3 days ago
Last week I was inspired to make a sweet treat featuring apples and cinnamon. You see, I had a big bag of dried apples from the Okanagan in BC (which ironically is very close to where I am visiting my mom right now). I envisioned a dense...
Last week I was inspired to make a sweet treat featuring apples and cinnamon. You see, I had a big bag of dried apples from the Okanagan in BC (which ironically is very close to where I am visiting my mom right now). I envisioned a dense bar with a creamy luscious frosting... and that's exactly what I created.Even though they look decadent, I think they're great as an afternoon energy boost or post workout snack. With the protein from the nuts, health fat from the nuts and coconut, and carbs from the dried fruit, these are truly filling and satisfying.You can dress them down, as I did above with just a sprinkling of chopped dried apples. Or dress them up by adding a dusting of cinnamon...And make them entertaining worthy by drizzling coconut nectar or maple syrup over the top.Apple Cinnamon Bars with Coconut Vanilla FrostingYou can half this recipe and use an 8x8" pan for a thin layer of bars.Apple Cinnamon Bars2 1/2 cups almonds1 cup shredded coconut1 cup finely chopped, packed dried apples2/3 cup pitted packed dates, chopped2 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract2-4 teaspoons water, as neededGrind the almonds down to flour in a food processor.Add the coconut, apples, dates, and cinnamon. Grind until completely broken down.Add the vanilla and water, starting with 1 teaspoon water. Process again. The mixture must hold together easily. Moist but not too wet.Press the dough firmly into the bottom of a 9" pan.Coconut Vanilla Frosting1/2 cup cashews1/2 cup almond milk or water3 tablespoons coconut nectar3/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract6 drops vanilla medicine flower essence, optional but boosts vanilla taste a lot1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon melted coconut butter5 tablespoons melted coconut oilBlend the cashews, almond milk, coconut nectar, and vanilla in a high speed blender until completely smooth.Add the coconut oil and butter. Blend to incorporate.Pour the liquid mixture over the bars.Chill in the fridge or freezer until the frosting is set.Sprinkle with chopped dried apples and/or cinnamon.Slice into bars.For another apple cinnamon recipe, check out the Raw Apple Cinnamon Crepes recipe that I posted last Fall.
3 days ago