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BioContacted the blog via Facebook . Below is a link to the debut album . Played twice so far . I think it's very good . . Worth checking out ..link
BioContacted the blog via Facebook . Below is a link to the debut album . Played twice so far . I think it's very good . . Worth checking out ..link
about 3 hours ago
Record found today at the Oxfam in Crewe for 99p. Big band calypso with some nice pan playing. A bit MOR for my taste but an interesting addition to my ever growing calypso aquisitions.Wikipedia says - “Edmund William Ross was born in...
Record found today at the Oxfam in Crewe for 99p. Big band calypso with some nice pan playing. A bit MOR for my taste but an interesting addition to my ever growing calypso aquisitions.Wikipedia says - “Edmund William Ross was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad. His mother Luisa Urquart was a teacher, thought to be descended from indigenous Caribs, and his father, William Hope-Ross, was of Scottish descent. He was the eldest of four children, having two sisters, Ruby and Eleanor, followed by a half-brother, Hugo. His parents separated after Hugo was born, and after various false steps Edmund was enrolled in a military academy. There he became interested in music and learned to play the euphonium. From 1927 to 1937 his family lived in Caracas, Venezuela.He played in the Venezuelan Military Academy Band as well as being a tympanist in the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra. As Sue Steward noted in his obituary: "His local name, 'Edmundo Ros', launched a lasting myth that he was Venezuelan." Later he received a music scholarship from the government, and, from 1937 to 1942, studied harmony, composition and orchestration at the Royal Academy of Music. At the same time he was the vocalist and percussionist in Don Marino Baretto's band at the Embassy Club, and also recorded several sides as a sideman to Fats Waller, who was visiting London in 1938.In August 1940, Ros formed his own rumba band, performing as Edmundo Ros and His Rumba Band. In 1941 he cut his first tracks with Parlophone, the first number being "Los Hijos de Buda". The band played regularly at the Coconut Grove club in Regent Street, attracting members of high society.Ros's bands were always based in London nightclubs or restaurants. The first was the Cosmo Club in Wardour Street; then followed the St Regis Hotel, Cork Street, the Coconut Grove and the Bagatelle Restaurant. At the Bagatelle a visit from Princess Elizabeth and party made his name. The future queen danced in public for the first time to Edmundo's music. In later years his orchestra was often invited to play at Buckingham Palace.By 1946 Ros owned a club, a dance school, a record company and an artistes' agency. His band grew to 16 musicians and was renamed Edmundo Ros and His Orchestra. Among his percussionists was Ginger Johnson. His number "The Wedding Samba", 1949, sold three million 78s. His album Rhythms of The South (1958) was one of the first high-quality LP stereo records: it sold a million copies. He was with Decca Records from 1944 to 1974, and altogether he made more than 800 recordings.In 1951 Ros bought the Coconut Grove on Regent Street and in 1964 renamed it Edmundo Ros's Dinner and Supper Club. The club became popular for its atmosphere and music, but it closed in 1965, when legalised casino gambling had drawn away many of its best customers. During the 1950s and 1960s the Ros orchestra appeared frequently on BBC Radio, continuing into the early 1970s on Radio Two Ballroom.In 1975, during Ros's seventh tour of Japan, his band's Musicians' Union shop steward tried to usurp Ros's authority by making arrangements with venues behind his back. Upon their return to the UK Ros organised a celebratory dinner after a BBC recording session and announced the disbanding of the orchestra. He destroyed almost all the charts (arrangement sheets), which conclusively ended the orchestra's existence.”Tracks are as follows - 1. Saturday Night 2. Panther's Going To The Moon 3. All Night Tonight 4. Granpa's Advice 5. The Sky Jackers ( Calling Habana ) 6. Simple CalypsoEdmundo Ros - Side One
about 8 hours ago
OZZY OSBOURNE Live! Rare 1981 US 3-track promotional-only 12" picture disc EP including Mr. Crowley, You Said It All & Suicide Solution. This copy has remarkably managed to remain sticker sealed in the original custom stickered clear ...
OZZY OSBOURNE Live! Rare 1981 US 3-track promotional-only 12" picture disc EP including Mr. Crowley, You Said It All & Suicide Solution. This copy has remarkably managed to remain sticker sealed in the original custom stickered clear PVC sleeve! PD-9170 BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN/E STREET BAND Live In New York City Rare 2001 UK 19-track triple vinyl LP set including two brand new songs - Land Of Hope And Dreams & American Skin 41 Shots; also contains six additional performances - Lost In The Flood,Born InThe USA, Don't Look Back, Jungleland, Ramrod & If I Should Fall Behind. Housed in a superb hype-stickered tri-fold picture sleeve which includes lyrics 5000001 MILES DAVIS Kind Of Blue Beautiful & historic 1959 US first stereo issue of the undisputed classic 5-track LP, on the deep groove red & black 'six eye' Columbia label - towering well above its peers, an album to end all jazz albums! This is the very rare original US pressing with uncorrected speed, the wrong track sequence for the second side (Flamenco Sketches first, All Blues second), & Cannonball Adderley's name misspelled as 'Adderly' on the cover.
about 12 hours ago
Test your knowledge! http://www.buzzfeed.com/perpetua/surprising-facts-about-beatles-songs 1. “Get Back” The first draft of “Get Back” included the line “Don’t dig no Pakistani taking all the people’s jobs,” but the line wa...
Test your knowledge! http://www.buzzfeed.com/perpetua/surprising-facts-about-beatles-songs 1. “Get Back” The first draft of “Get Back” included the line “Don’t dig no Pakistani taking all the people’s jobs,” but the line was cut when the band realized that the lyric, intended to be an ironic comment on right-wing groups attacking Pakistani immigrants, would be interpreted as racist. They were right about this: Years later, The Sun found a copy of the first draft and accused the band of xenophobia. 2. “Can’t Buy Me Love” The band’s regular sound engineer Norman Smith played all the hi-hat parts in “Can’t Buy Me Love” after discovering that the tape with the percussion parts recorded in Paris had a ripple in it when it arrived at Abbey Road, which lost the treble in Ringo Starr’s performance. Smith recorded new parts himself, but The Beatles never knew about it. Via johngushue.typepad.com 3. “Martha My Dear” Paul McCartney wrote “Martha My Dear” about his beloved 3-year-old Old English sheepdog, though it’s more likely the romantic lyrics were really about his eventual wife Linda Eastman, who he met just before the song was written. 4. “I Am the Walrus” The “egg man” in “I Am the Walrus” was a reference to John Lennon’s friend Eric Burdon of The Animals. He gave him that nickname after Burdon told him a storyabout a sexual encounter he had with a Jamaican woman who cracked an egg on his bare stomach and licked the yolk off his body. Via ericburdon.ning.com 5. “Twist and Shout” Nearly all of Please Please Me was recorded live to tape in a single day — Feb. 11, 1963 — and “Twist and Shout” was the final song to be tracked. The song was saved for last because John Lennon was feeling very ill, and George Martin wanted to preserve his voice through the day. By the time they recorded the song, Lennon had a very sore throat but sucked on a few Zubes cough drops, gargled some milk, and took off his shirt before launching into one of the finest — and raspiest — performances of his career. “My voice wasn’t the same for a long time after,” he said in 1976. “Every time I swallowed it was like sandpaper.” 6. “When I’m Sixty-Four” Paul wrote “When I’m Sixty-Four” on his father’s piano when he was 16, years before co-founding The Beatles. The song was played often during the band’s residency at the Cavern Club, usually with just Paul on piano to kill time if one of the amps broke down. 7. “Day Tripper” German radio programmers were reluctant to play “Day Tripper” on the air because the word “tripper” is German slang for gonorrhea. 8. “Come Together” “Come Together” was conceived as a rally song for LSD guru Timothy Leary’s campaign to become the governor of California and unseat the Republican incumbent Ronald Reagan in 1969. Leary’s campaign slogan was “come together, join the party,” with the word “party” intended as a reference to drug culture. Leary’s campaign came to an end when he was incarcerated for drug possession, which freed Lennon up to develop it as a Beatles song instead. Leary later attacked Lennon for “stealing” the idea, but Lennon maintained that he owed him nothing. 9. “I Saw Her Standing There” Paul McCartney says in the book Paul McCartney: Many Years From Now that the bass line from “I Saw Her Standing There” was lifted from Chuck Berry’s “I’m Talking About You.” “I played exactly the same notes as he’d did and it fitted our number perfectly,” he said. “Even now when I tell people about it, I find few of them believe me. Therefore I maintain that a bass riff doesn’t have to be original.” 10. “With a Little Help from My Friends” The original line in “With a Little Help from My Friends” was “What would you do if I sang out of tune / Would you stand up and throw tomatoes at me?” but Ringo made them change it, presumably because he didn’t want anyone to ac
about 13 hours ago
Humpty Dumpty’s Album for Little Children  Bud Collyer  RCA Records (1958)  Bud Collyer supplied the voices of both Superman and his alter ego Clark Kent. A highlight of every Superman episode was the moment when Clark Kent transfo...
Humpty Dumpty’s Album for Little Children  Bud Collyer  RCA Records (1958)  Bud Collyer supplied the voices of both Superman and his alter ego Clark Kent. A highlight of every Superman episode was the moment when Clark Kent transformed into Superman, an effect which Collyer conveyed by shifting voices while speaking the immortal phrase “This looks like a job for Superman!”. (Collyer’s voice deepened by an octave while making the transition from one identity to the other.)  Collyer went on to host Beat the Clock, and in 1956, became the host of To Tell the Truth on CBS.
1 day ago
A 10" LP I found today at a boot sale. On the Concert Hall record label from 1962. Kenneth Horne is better remembered as the amusing a genial host of radio's Round The Horne which featured Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick and Betty Marsden...
A 10" LP I found today at a boot sale. On the Concert Hall record label from 1962. Kenneth Horne is better remembered as the amusing a genial host of radio's Round The Horne which featured Kenneth Williams, Hugh Paddick and Betty Marsden etc. in the 60's. Interesting to hear him here narrating this tale set to the music of Prokofiev which I always thought was tinged with a certain undefinable melancholy. One can't help thinking - any minute now Rambling Syd Rumpo will appear to spoil the mood and regale us with a Swoggler's Nadgering Song! Wikipedia says - "Kenneth Horne (27 February 1907 – 14 February 1969) was an English comedian and businessman. The son of a clergyman and politician, he combined a successful business career with regular broadcasting for the BBC. His first hit series, Much-Binding-in-the-Marsh, written with his co-star Richard Murdoch, arose out of his wartime service as an officer in the Royal Air Force. Ill health forced him to choose between commerce and show business after 1958, and, choosing the latter, he made two further popular radio series, Beyond Our Ken (1958–1964) and Round the Horne (1965–1968) Charles Kenneth Horne was the seventh and youngest child of Charles Silvester Horne and his wife, the Hon. Katherine neé Cozens-Hardy. Silvester Horne was a Congregationalist minister, Liberal MP for Ipswich, and powerful orator. His maternal grandfather was Herbert Cozens-Hardy, the Liberal MP for North Norfolk who became both the Master of the Rolls and Baron Cozens-Hardy on 1 July 1914. Horne was educated at a preparatory school in Shrewsbury, followed by St George's School, Harpenden and the London School of Economics. His tutors at the LSE included Hugh Dalton and Stephen Leacock. Horne was dissatisfied there, and through the generosity of an uncle, Austin Pilkington of the Pilkington glassmaking family of St Helens, he was enabled to go instead to Magdalene College, Cambridge. He represented the university at tennis, partnering Bunny Austin, but was academically undistinguished and so neglectful of his studies that he was sent down in 1927. Austin Pilkington was aggrieved at Horne's failure to make the most of the opportunity he had provided, and he decided against offering him a post in the family firm. However, through his contacts within the industry, he secured for the young Horne an interview with the Triplex Safety Glass Company at King's Norton, a district of Birmingham. Horne's sporting record commended him to the manager of the Triplex factory, and he was taken on as a management trainee on a very modest salary. In 1930, despite his unimpressive finances, he married Lady Mary Pelham-Clinton-Hope, daughter of the 8th Duke of Newcastle. The marriage was happy at first, but they were sexually incompatible. His wife left him and returned to her family home. The marriage was annulled in 1933 on the grounds of non-consummation, although the two remained on friendly terms thereafter. When Horne's first marriage was dissolved, he was sought out by a former girlfriend, Joan Burgess, daughter of a neighbour at King's Norton. Unlike his first wife, she had much in common with him, including a liking for squash, tennis and golf and for dancing. A month before her 21st birthday they were married, in September 1936." Peter & The Wolf - Side One. Peter & The Wolf -Side Two
1 day ago
THE BEATLES Beatles VI 1965 US first issue 11-track mono vinyl LP on the 'rainbow rim' label, front pasted picture sleeve complete with the original illustrated label catalogue inner. This incredible 'time warp' copy ha...
THE BEATLES Beatles VI 1965 US first issue 11-track mono vinyl LP on the 'rainbow rim' label, front pasted picture sleeve complete with the original illustrated label catalogue inner. This incredible 'time warp' copy has miraculously managed to remain FACTORY SEALED. OASIS [What's The Story] Morning Glory Rare spectacular official IFPI Certified Platinum award actually presented to Oasis to commemorate European album sales in excess of 1,000,000 units. This unique award measures 11½" x 16" in size with the top cut at an angle, featuring the album artwork above a copy of the Compact Disc, mounted on a frosted sheet of glass with a second sheet over the top which has been custom etched with the dedication text, held together by two metal bolts. Unlike many awards this comes in an 18½" x 14½" x 2" green velvet box with the 'ifpi' logo on the lid in silver. IRON MAIDEN/MICHAEL SCHENKER GROUP Special DJ Copy (Mega rare genuine 1981 Japanese 8-track promotional only LP with genuine machine-stamped matrices. The first side features material from the first MSG album whilst the second side has two songs from the first two Iron Maiden albums including Wrathchild, Killers, Phantom Of The Opera & Iron Maiden. Custom printed labels with 'MFD By Toshiba-EMI LTD' perimted text, housed in a unique titled heavy card sleeve with tracklisting, albumcatalogue numbers and tour dates listed.
1 day ago
The Bachelors  “Bachelors’ Girls”  Decca Records (Australia)  A couple of notes of interest.  I believe that Jimmy Page plays on this and one of the “girls” on the cover is “Miss Lovey Kravezit”,...
The Bachelors  “Bachelors’ Girls”  Decca Records (Australia)  A couple of notes of interest.  I believe that Jimmy Page plays on this and one of the “girls” on the cover is “Miss Lovey Kravezit”, Dean Martin’s secretary in “The Silencers”.
2 days ago
Singer special Stacey Kent, Tina May and Ce?cile McLorin Salvant reveal varied aspects of jazz singing todayDoes jazz change the world?Brian Morton recalls a special night 30 years ago in Warsaw when jazz really did seem to signal ...
Singer special Stacey Kent, Tina May and Ce?cile McLorin Salvant reveal varied aspects of jazz singing todayDoes jazz change the world?Brian Morton recalls a special night 30 years ago in Warsaw when jazz really did seem to signal freedomAnec-dotage Alan Luff urges us to listen one more once to a jazz great surely immune to criticismBook reviews There Was A Fire: Jews, Music And The American Dream; Dameronia: The Life And Music Of Tadd Dameron; The Brecon Jazz Story In Photographs; Shaping Jazz; Late Life Jazz; Leo Wright DiscographyDizzy Reece Simon Spillett responds to reader Dave Taylor’s plea last month for an article on the turbulent trumpeter Follow Jazz Journal here.  
2 days ago
As part of our exclusive coverage of Mark Lewisohn's new Beatles biography, the author shares an extract about how the Beatles, the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan kicked off the Sixties on the same day, 5 October 1962. ...
As part of our exclusive coverage of Mark Lewisohn's new Beatles biography, the author shares an extract about how the Beatles, the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan kicked off the Sixties on the same day, 5 October 1962. The day the Sixties broke out, the Beatles were in Nuneaton, playing the art deco Co-op Ballroom. They were in the Midlands, a hundred miles south of Liverpool: different accents, another dot on Brian Epstein’s campaign map. It was standard format that at least one local act would flesh out the bills and on this occasion it was a Rugby-based group called the Mighty Avengers; as their drummer, David "Biffo" Beech, would relate, the Beatles dropped into their world as if from another planet. "We did our little bit – covers of Cliff and stuff like that – but as soon as they came on, the whole place stopped. They sounded so different to blokes like us who were doing the usual thing. People just stood there and thought, 'Crikey, who are these?'" Read the full article at The Telegraph
2 days ago