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If you're around San Francisco tomorrow make sure to get to FTC to check out this art show featuring the work of Bryce Kanights.
If you're around San Francisco tomorrow make sure to get to FTC to check out this art show featuring the work of Bryce Kanights.
about 3 hours ago
Games of Thrones has made Peter Dinklage a household name in the movie/TV geek community. Yet, in reality, the Golden Globe-winning actor – responsible for bringing sharp-witted Tyrion Lannister to life on the HBO fantasy series &#...
Games of Thrones has made Peter Dinklage a household name in the movie/TV geek community. Yet, in reality, the Golden Globe-winning actor – responsible for bringing sharp-witted Tyrion Lannister to life on the HBO fantasy series – has been making a name for himself for more than a decade now, between leading turns in indie fare like The Station Agent and scene-stealing appearances in films like Elf and both versions of Death at a Funeral (not to mention, his previous memorable supporting roles on TV shows like Threshold and Nip/Tuck). Paramount has acquired a comedy vehicle with Dinklage attached to star, as will be produced by Disruption Entertainment’s Cale Boyter and Mary Parent (Role Models). The ...Click to continue reading Peter Dinklage to Headline R-Rated Comedy from ‘Bad Words’ Writer
about 3 hours ago
At Saturday's Southern California Sports Collectors Show a number of families were in attendance, but one young man found himself diving into the world of pre-war issues. Unlike most kids his age who are buying the latest Apple products ...
At Saturday's Southern California Sports Collectors Show a number of families were in attendance, but one young man found himself diving into the world of pre-war issues. Unlike most kids his age who are buying the latest Apple products and video games, Asher A., 13 of Southern California, has been collecting baseball cards for six years. Collecting on a budget, he has found a way to fund his hobby - purchasing packs of modern cards and selling the 'hits'. Southern California collector Asher A. poses with 3 1909-11 T206 cards. You would expect a teenager to do most of their transactions on the internet, but Asher frequents Southern California shops and shows. "I like to see the cards," he said, sounding more like a seasoned collector several times his age. In fact, he has already assembled a collection of several hundred pre-war vintage cards including numerous examples from T206, as well as 1935 Goudey 4-in-1, T213 Coupon, and even 19th century examples from N172 Old Judge. A fan of the Anaheim Angels, he would much rather own a card of the legendary Roberto Clemente than any of the stars he has seen perform in person. Clemente, along with Jackie Robinson, is among the players favored by his father, who maintains a small collection of his own comprised of players be views as role models for his children. In his spare time - if such a thing exists for today's teenagers - Asher is an accomplished baseball player. A four time all-star, he recently participated in a tournament in Cooperstown, New York, which is home to the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Seemingly always one step ahead with his collection and his athleticism, he has even begun practicing with the local high school team, despite the fact he only just recently turned 13! Asher A. examines a display of his favorite issue - 1909-11 T206 The T206 back craze has not escaped him either.  He counts the Cycle back as his favorite. A true purist, he based this preference on aesthetics rather than rarity. A collector of Hall of Famers as well as commons, the famed Yankee manager Miller Huggins, then pictured as a National Leaguer, is currently the favorite T206 in his collection. "They look cooler. There's more history to them," Asher said, explaining his preference for the century old tobacco cards, compared to the modern issues. Ever the optimist when asked which T206 he would someday like to own he could give but one answer: "Honus Wagner". Related Posts:SoCal Show Draws Impressive Mix of Old School Dealers and…T206 Obsession Can Test Domestic BlissSouthern California Sports Card Event Strives to Recapture…Southern California Show Set for Maiden VoyageJumbo Wagner Going Back on the Block
about 16 hours ago
by Amy Johnson, Managing Editor, HockeyPub.com PITTSBURGH, PA — Max Pacioretty, Jarred Tinordi, Alex Galchenyuk, Michael McCarron.  What do those names mean to you?  To many fans they represent the promise, strength, and hope of th...
by Amy Johnson, Managing Editor, HockeyPub.com PITTSBURGH, PA — Max Pacioretty, Jarred Tinordi, Alex Galchenyuk, Michael McCarron.  What do those names mean to you?  To many fans they represent the promise, strength, and hope of the Montreal Canadiens’ next generation.  For the Habs management, they represent four highly valued first round picks taken in recent years at the NHL Entry Draft.  And for the folks at USA Hockey, they represent the success of years of development that they’ve put into programs and players all across America. According to statistics, Americans have been selected 23 per cent of the time in the first or second rounds of the NHL Entry Draft since 1999.  Six Americans have been taken as the first overall pick in the history of the draft.  There’s no denying that players from the U.S. are making a bigger impact on the professional hockey scene every year, and it’s a trend that USA Hockey hopes to continue. Recently, they held the 2nd Annual CCM/USA Hockey All-American Prospects Game at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, PA.  The game featured 40 top American-born players eligible for the 2014 NHL Entry Draft, coached by Mark Johnson and Joe Mullen.  ”We’re getting number one picks, we’re getting quite a few high picks and, you know, we’re seeing them play in the NHL and that’s all because they start this process when they’re 14, 15 years old,” says Coach Johnson. Ryan MacInnis, who currently plays for the Kitchener Rangers, had a lot of good things to say about USA Hockey and the Prospects Game.  ”I think it really gets the name out, all the names of the American players, and that anybody can really play anywhere.”  By anywhere, he’s referring to the fact that although, like him,  many players come from the cold and snowy mid-western region, there are a growing number of quality hockey players coming out of less traditional areas of the country. Thatcher Demko, one of the two goaltenders for Coach Johnson’s team, comes from the sunny land of San Diego, CA and believes that the influence of NHL teams in warmer climates has really inspired young athletes in those areas to take up the sport.  He was one of five Californian players on the roster, along with players from Minnesota, New York, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Massachusetts, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Colorado, New Hampshire, and Ohio. Ryan MacInnis, after the morning skate After a brief morning skate, where both teams had a chance to get acquainted with their linemates and coaches, it was the media’s turn to get to know these up-and-coming hockey stars.  Many of the players were already familiar with their teammates, having played with them growing up and by being involved in USA Hockey’s developmental programs.  One such pairing was MacInnis and Blake Clarke, who played on the same team growing up and have known each other since they were about seven years old.   When asked to describe MacInnis as a player Clarke was quick to reply, calling him “Lanky, good skater, he’s got good hands.  I’d say the one thing that stands out to me is his vision – he’s a great playmaker.” When asked to give a scouting report on himself, MacInnis gave a similar summation.  ”Big center, I’m a two-way forward, too.  Skating is not bad, pretty good shot, and good vision.”  He seems to be enjoying his experience in Kitchener so far, too.  ”I like it.  It’s a great town, great fans, great teammates, the staff is awesome.  We’re kind of like role models in the town.  It’s a good feeling.” Ryan also had positive things to say about Sonny Milano, a 6’0″, 183 lb. left-winger from New York.  ”[He's a] really skilled player.  He’s actually really fun to play with, he’ll get you the puck if he’s in the corner.” Thatcher Demko, after morning skat
about 20 hours ago
If you’re in the San Francisco area leading up to the Dew Tour, be sure to catch the Renegades and Role Models photo show on Thursday October 10, from 7:30 pm – 10 pm at FTCSF. The show will highlight 30 years of skate photog...
If you’re in the San Francisco area leading up to the Dew Tour, be sure to catch the Renegades and Role Models photo show on Thursday October 10, from 7:30 pm – 10 pm at FTCSF. The show will highlight 30 years of skate photography by Bryce Kanights. In addition to the iconic images, you’ll be treated to DJ sets from Orb and Tommy Guerrero. Don’t miss it!!
1 day ago
Auckland, New Zealand’s pop sensation Ella Yelich-O’Connor—stage name Lorde—first signed a record deal at age 13, and it wasn’t long before it began to pay dividends in confidence for the young talent. Last ...
Auckland, New Zealand’s pop sensation Ella Yelich-O’Connor—stage name Lorde—first signed a record deal at age 13, and it wasn’t long before it began to pay dividends in confidence for the young talent. Last year’s The Love Club EP spawned the worldwide hit “Royals,” meaning the now 16-year-old singer can tout both a chart-topping hit and a follow-up—“Tennis Court”—that was picked up by Wimbledon among the 10 tracks on her proper full-length debut. Pure Heroine is a scattered, but preternaturally gifted album, charting the rise of a new teen phenom with enough awareness to navigate crossover success with aplomb. The narrative surrounding Lorde has, at times, threatened to overshadow her music. She once alluded to Taylor Swift when discussing how Photoshopped images create poor role models for young girls, which led to Swift fans calling her out for a perceived attack. One of ... Read more
1 day ago
Regina Harris Baiocchi addresses the Evanston High School orchestra during a rehearsal of one of her works, a commission occasioned by the school's 125th anniversary. Dolores White Renee' Baker John Malveaux...
Regina Harris Baiocchi addresses the Evanston High School orchestra during a rehearsal of one of her works, a commission occasioned by the school's 125th anniversary. Dolores White Renee' Baker John Malveaux of www.MusicUNTOLD.com sends this link: Renee' Baker, Dolores White and Regina Harris Baiocchi featured in Chamber Music America diversity article: http://www.chamber-music.org/mag/2013/fall/index.htmlPage 106 start Chamber Music AmericaWhat It Takes to Be Heard by Monica Hairston O'Connell Diversity, as an institutional force anyway, can be lazy. Ironically, the one is frequently called upon to stand in for the many and is all too often the beginning and end of diversity's quest. A good thing about the Center for Black Music Research - where I work - is that it continually points to the many, through its publications, performance and educational programming, information services, and research initiatives. This iterative strategy is an important one, because diversity, as an institutional force, can also be hard of hearing. With this in mind, I chose for this article to feature the voices of, if not the many, at least the multiple. To get a sense of their experiences and views, I talked with three African-American female composer/performers from Chicago - Renée Baker, Regina Harris Baiocchi, and Dolores White. ... Dolores White came from a family that was centered in the arts. Her mother was a dancer, her aunt an actress; and her grandmother exposed her to music and dance early on. She attended Lindblom Academy, then a predominantly white high school that did not allow African Americans in the choir. But in addition to piano (which she had played since age six), White played cello; and the committed director of the school orchestra helped make that ensemble her refuge. Pianist Philippa Schuyler and pianist/composer Natalie Harris - both of whom White saw in concert when she was growing up - served as role models. Although White herself wouldnot begin composing until later in life, these major artists inspired her to dedicate her life to music. Regina Harris Baiocchi - whose compositional interests have always spanned pop, classical, jazz and gospel - emphasizes the extent to which a rich array of dedicated teachers and mentors created a safe space in which she could develop her own voice across genres. Conductor/composer James L. Mack was an early role model - Baiocchi was friends with Mack's daughter Elaine and a student of his protégé Lionel Bordelon. ... Baker says that presenting organizations don't spend a lot of time looking for contemporary African American composers generally, whether male or female. Instead, "when someone wans to program African-American music, they take a jump back in history - and those of us living don't exist." That's why Baker decided to start her own ensemble. "I had no intention of [waiting] for someone to ask to hear my music. I was going to play it, get it out in the world."
1 day ago
Photo Courtesy of nocoastbias.com I used to hold a general disinterest and lack of respect for professional football players.  I used to picture them as entitled, egotistical, and “jock-headed”.  Perhaps it was my lack of kno...
Photo Courtesy of nocoastbias.com I used to hold a general disinterest and lack of respect for professional football players.  I used to picture them as entitled, egotistical, and “jock-headed”.  Perhaps it was my lack of knowledge and understanding for the sport, or perhaps it was the only way I knew how to picture them in my head.  Movies depict football players to be the guy that still wears his letter jacket at age 45, and the bully that never really moved past his glory days.  Although there are movies that lift the players up, I chose to picture a majority of the group as the latter version. Maybe it is because football season is upon us; or maybe because my Fantasy league is doing unexpectedly well .  But my interest has peaked and I’m beginning to see the players in a different light. Nowadays I see football players to be Christians, Athletes that have worked their butts off, Role-models, Family-men and Professionals with a career.  I see humans. Men from all walks of life. Men who once had a childhood dream and turned it into reality.  It’s respectable.  I respect that. I’m beginning to respect the game.  The trial and the error that goes into each play.  The precision of each call.  The sweat and sincere worry that hovers over the players’ brow in the last 45 seconds of the 4th quarter.  The dedication.  The coaches that bring a team back.  The coaches that make their players better men. I have found a respect for men that play football each week.  The men who use their sport as a platform for a higher cause, whether it be Christianity, a foundation, education or athletics.  It’s admirable.  I stand behind that.  And as I write this, I think I have missed the larger picture – the point – of football all along.  It’s not always about the actual game.  It’s about the camaraderie the players instill in the crowds.  The memories it gives to the people that follow each week.  The role models that emerge from the sport, and inspire children (young and old) to be better people – to follow their dreams.  It’s about a lot of things.  And I missed the point for so long. With that, I welcome myself to the game of Football. Until Next Time, xo Alex
2 days ago
by Sara McGinnis posted in Celebrities Annie Lennox is making headlines for letting her true feelings about young, overtly sexual pop stars be known publicly. In a pair of Facebook posts shared over the weekend, the 58-year-old singer w...
by Sara McGinnis posted in Celebrities Annie Lennox is making headlines for letting her true feelings about young, overtly sexual pop stars be known publicly. In a pair of Facebook posts shared over the weekend, the 58-year-old singer wrote of her dismay at the direction performances have gone, and what should be done about protecting young kids from such acts. In a message posted October 5 that didn't name any specific stars but seems to be in reference to the recent Miley Cyrus twerking uproar, Annie Lennox shared: I have to say that I'm disturbed and dismayed by the recent spate of overtly sexualised performances and videos. You know the ones I'm talking about. It seems obvious that certain record companies are peddling highly styled pornography with musical accompaniment. As if the tidal wave of sexualised imagery wasn't already bombarding impressionable young girls enough..I believe in freedom of speech and expression, but the market forces don't give a toss about the notion of boundaries. As long as there's booty to make money out of, it will be bought and sold. It's depressing to see how these performers are so eager to push this new level of low.Their assumption seems to be that misogyny- utilised and displayed through oneself is totally fine, as long as you are the one creating it. As if it's all justified by how many millions of dollars and U tube hits you get from behaving like pimp and prostitute at the same time. It's a glorified and monetized form of self harm. On Sunday, the "Walking on Broken Glass" singer went on to clarify: I tried to be carefully measured with my comments on yesterday’s blog, realizing that the subject clearly courts controversy and divisiveness. On reflection I will say that sexuality is an inherent and profound part of life. There is absolutely nothing “wrong” about our sexuality or sensuality per se — but if a performing artist has an audience of impressionable young fans and they want to present a soft porn video or highly sexualized live performance, then it needs to qualify as such and be X-rated for adults only. I’m talking from the perspective of the parents of those young fans. The whole thing is about their children’s protection. Is it appropriate for seven-year-olds to be thrusting their pelvises like pole dancers? I really don’t think so. Boundaries need to be put in place so that young kids aren’t barraged by market forces exploiting the “normalization” of explicit sex in under age entertainment. That means – no audiences under 18. Simple! Well – not quite. The Internet has put paid to “boundaries” and “simple.” Here's a look back at what other stars have said about becoming role models for kids -- like it or not: jQuery(document).ready(function(){ var imgs = [ { thumb:'http://blogs.babycenter.com/wp-content/gallery/celebrities-on-being-role-models/thumbs/thumbs_a05ca780631b11e28e2d22000a1fbe71_7.jpg', image:'http://blogs.babycenter.com/wp-content/gallery/celebrities-on-being-role-models/a05ca780631b11e28e2d22000a1fbe71_7.jpg', title:'a05ca780631b11e28e2d22000a1fbe71_7', description:'Rihanna: \"See, people... they want me to be a role model just because of the life I lead. The things I say in my songs, they expect it of me, and it became more of my job than I wanted it to be. But no, I just want to make music. That\'s it.\"' }, { thumb:'http://blogs.babycenter.com/wp-content/gallery/celebrities-on-being-role-models/thumbs/thumbs_tumblr_mfe1qqn2ro1rqgjz2o1_1280.jpg', image:'http://blogs.babycenter.com/wp-content/gallery/celebrities-on-being-role-models/tumblr_mfe1qqn2ro1rqgjz2o1_1280.jpg', title:'tumblr_mfe1qqn2ro1rqgjz2o1_1280', description:'Beyonce: “Being a role model is something that every woman is. Even if you don\'t realize it there is someone always watching you, there is someone that admires you. I don\'t take being a role model lightly.\"' }, { thumb:'http://blogs.babycenter.com/wp-content/ga
2 days ago
All right, so I'm gonna let you in on a little secret. But you gotta promise you won't tell my fellow iFixiters. I'm not a fixer. I don't fix my computer when its hard drive overheats. I don't puff up with confidence ...
All right, so I'm gonna let you in on a little secret. But you gotta promise you won't tell my fellow iFixiters. I'm not a fixer. I don't fix my computer when its hard drive overheats. I don't puff up with confidence when I get a flat tire. I don't look at a broken curtain rod and say, "I got this." Nope—I’m not the girl you’re looking for. At least, I wasn’t. I grew up surrounded by very self-sufficient people: six Eagle Scouts (with two on the way), four technicians, one architect, and an enthusiastic father who learned everything he knows about repair from “Grandpa Smithy.” But there’s a trend in my family—and most of my girlfriends’ families—that’s hard to ignore. All the fixers are men. They tinker and build and play, then grab a beer and watch a game afterwards. I didn’t. I wasn’t offended, though. I didn’t shout or pout or beg for my own set of screwdrivers. I was perfectly fine letting the boys be boys. I’m probably making my fellow feminists cringe, but that’s just how it was. I didn’t fix because I wasn’t really taught to fix. And somewhere down the line, I stopped caring to learn. That doesn’t mean I’m helpless—not by a long shot. I was encouraged to be independent, smart, capable, and career-oriented. I mean, I’ve never been short on female role models. Aunty Jan, a CPA with her own firm, or cousin Christina, a philanthropic athlete, or my mom Lynn, a talented artist… just to name a few. I was the next act in a long series of powerful women, and the sky was my limit. Safe to say, my family always told me to be my own person and stand for what I believe in—just so happens that my beliefs didn’t cover leaky faucets. And I was able to maintain my non-fixing lifestyle for more than 20 years, nearly seven of those years living alone. Thanks to my paid plumber and the nice guy with the toolbox down the street, I got along just fine. Then I met the folks at iFixit. For them, repair was a more than an action. It was a state of mind. And what they said made a whole lotta sense: Fixing things is good for the environment, it helps child-miners in developing countries, it saves you money. Cool, great, got it, I thought to myself. But I wasn’t drinking the Kool-Aid just yet. Until one day when I was working in the office, drinking my daily tea. Unsurprisingly, my klutzy hand knocked over the nearly-full mug and I spilled Purely Peppermint Yogi all over my laptop’s trackpad. Giddy with fear, my stomach dropped as every other muscle in my body seized up: “Oh shit,” I thought. “How much is this repair gonna cost?” But before I could pull out the credit card, a group of my co-workers jumped at the opportunity to open something up. I shrugged, and without hesitation handed over the device. I didn’t even notice my assumption; once again, a good-natured boy was going to help me fix something. Wrong. One of the guys, Mike, grabbed the laptop and put it on a table next to a ProTech Toolkit. He looked over at me and asked, “Ya ready?” Ready for what? Ready to watch you? Yeah, sure. Very wrong. Mike pulled up a guide online on how to open a MacBook and told me to grab a PH000 screw out of the kit. I spent the next 10 minutes opening, cleaning, and reassembling my computer. It was quick, it was intimidating, it was freaking fantastic. I’ve owned that computer for five years. It’s been attached to my hip through countless hours of essay writing, photoshopping, Internet exploring, and the like. It’s certainly the object I use the most—for hours and hours a day. I love my computer. I’m not even ashamed to admit that I curiously nicknamed it “Spike” (thanks, James Marsters). So you’d think I’d know everything there is to know about my computer. But up until that ill
2 days ago