Sanford and Son

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(YouTube link)DJ Davyjones said he couldn't help but here the Sanford and Son theme music every time the Robin Thicke song "Burred Lines" played. They just go together like peas and carrots. -via Laughing Squid
(YouTube link)DJ Davyjones said he couldn't help but here the Sanford and Son theme music every time the Robin Thicke song "Burred Lines" played. They just go together like peas and carrots. -via Laughing Squid
about 1 hour ago
Eydie Gorme, the singer who both performed solo and with her husband Steve Lawrence, died 10 August 2013 at the age of 84.Eydie Gorme was born Edith Gormezano in The Bronx on 16 August 1928. She attended William Howard Taft High School, ...
Eydie Gorme, the singer who both performed solo and with her husband Steve Lawrence, died 10 August 2013 at the age of 84.Eydie Gorme was born Edith Gormezano in The Bronx on 16 August 1928. She attended William Howard Taft High School, where future director Stanley Kubrick numbered among her classmates. After graduating high school, she took night classes at City College while working during the day as a translator at the United Nations. On the weekends she sang with Ken Greenglass and his band. Ken Greenglass would become her manager and she sang on tour with Tommy Tucker and His Orchestra. It was with Tommy Tucker and his band that she made her recording debut in 1950. She went onto perform with the bands of both Tex Beneke and Ray Eberle.It was in 1952 that Eydie Gorme struck out on her own and recorded her first solo work. That same year she was the star of the Voice of America radio show Cita Con Eydie ("An Appointment with Eydie"), broadcast in Latin America. Her big break would come in 1953 when she appeared on Tonight, then hosted by Steve Allen. Also booked on the show was another singer, the man would one day become her husband, Steve Lawrence. It was in 1954 that Miss Gorme had her first hit single. The song "Fini" went to #19 on the American singles chart. In the late Fifties she would have three more top forty hits: "Too Close For Comfort"(which went to #39 in 1956), "Mama, Teach Me To Dance" (which went to #34 in 1956), "Love Me Forever" (which went to #24 in 1957), and "You Need Hands" (which went to #11 in 1958). Eydie Gorme appeared regularly on television in the Fifties. In addition to Tonight, she appeared on Look Up and Live, The Denny Vaughan Show, Frankie Laine Time, The Big Record, The Dinah Shore Chevy Show, The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom, Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall, Person to Person, The Milton Berle Show, The Patti Page Oldsmobile Show, and The Steve Allen Plymouth Show. In 1958 she and Steve Lawrence hosted their own summer replacement show, The Steve Lawrence-Eydie Gorme Show. Miss Gorme and Mr. Lawrence were married in 1957.In the Sixties Eydie Gorme would have her biggest hit. In 1963 "Blame It on the Bossa Nova" went to #7 on the Billboard singles chart. Miss Gorme would have only two more top forty hits during the decade on the Billboard Hot 100, both duets with her husband Steve Lawrence: "I Want To Stay Here" and I Can't Stop Talking About You". Her songs regularly hit the Billboard Easy Listening chart, among them the singles "Can't Get Over (the Bossa Nova)", "Just Dance On By", "Don't Go To Strangers", "What Did I Have That I Don't Have?", "Tonight I'll Say a Prayer", and so on. She also continued to appear frequently on television. Eydie Gorme and Steve Lawrence were frequent guests on The Garry Moore Show. Both with and without her husband, Miss Gorme appeared on such shows as Juke Box Jury, The Jimmy Dean Show, What's My Line, The Jack Paar Programme, I've Got a Secret, The Hollywood Palace, The Ed Sullivan Show, and The Kraft Music Hall.Eydie Gorme continued to regularly hit the Billboard Easy Listening chart in the Seventies with such songs as "Love is Blue/Autumn Leaves" (with her husband Steve Lawrence), "It Was a Good Time", and "What I Did For Love". She appeared on such TV shows as Here's Lucy, The Merv Griffin Show, Sammy and Company, Sanford and Son, The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, and The Carol Burnett Show. She and Steve Lawrence appeared in their own television specials, Steve and Eydie: Our Love Is Here to Stay, Steve & Eydie: From This Moment On...Cole Porter, and Steve & Eydie Celebrate Irving Berlin.After the Seventies Steve & Eydie focused more on performing American standards. Eydie Gorme released no more singles, although they continued to tour and released several more albums. She continued to make occasional appearances on television, on such shows as Empty Nest, The Nanny, The Tonight Show, Fraiser, and The Rosie O'Donnell Show. She had a cameo in Oc
about 1 month ago
I first saw Dennis Burkley on my TV screen in the mid-1970s, playing Mac on 'Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman'. Mac was a big good ol' boy who fell hard for Loretta Haggars while she had amnesia. He proved to be popular enough to keep around...
I first saw Dennis Burkley on my TV screen in the mid-1970s, playing Mac on 'Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman'. Mac was a big good ol' boy who fell hard for Loretta Haggars while she had amnesia. He proved to be popular enough to keep around Fernwood even after that storyline ran its course. After that, he co-starred in a Bill Macy sitcom, in the last incarnation of 'Sanford And Son' ('Sanford'), and provided the voice of the school principal in 'King Of The Hill'. Burkley died in his sleep over the weekend at the age of 67. He had been suffering from health problems over the last few years, according to his son. In a four episode arc during the 1980s, Burkley played a racist biker named Sonny Crocket in 'Hill Street Blues'. The writer who created his character, Anthony Yerkovich, would use that name again a year later for Don Johnson's character in 'Miami Vice'. The city in which 'Hill Street Blues' took place was never named, but was supposedly on the East Coast. The opening credits were filmed in Chicago and principle location shots were done in the Los Angeles area. So it's pozz'ble, just pozz'ble that palm trees may have invaded a few of the exterior scenes. But even if they didn't, it was still on the East Coast just as Miami is..... With 'Hill Street Blues' sharing the same coast as 'Miami Vice', why can't we make the claim that both Sonny Crocketts were related? Perhaps they were both named after a forebear - a Sonny Crockett who fought in the Civil War, maybe? They may not have been closely related, or it could have been they weren't raised in a tight-knit family, so there was no influence on each other's character. Works for me. Good night and may God bless, Dennis Burkley.....
about 1 month ago
Dennis Burkley, a character actor whose heavyset build and equally heavy Southern accent made him a memorable standout in a variety of roles in movies and on TV, has died of a heart attack at 67. Burkley made his movie debut in the 1973 ...
Dennis Burkley, a character actor whose heavyset build and equally heavy Southern accent made him a memorable standout in a variety of roles in movies and on TV, has died of a heart attack at 67. Burkley made his movie debut in the 1973 grindhouse horror thriller Bummer, then landed smaller roles in Bob Rafelson’s Stay Hungry (1976), Heroes (2977), and Laserblast  (1978), as well as a slew of guest spots on TV series, often playing redneck toughs.  For a few months in 1980 and 1981, he had a steady job playing sidekick to Redd Foxx on Sanford, a sequel to Foxx’s ‘70s starring vehicle Sanford And Son. The show wasn’t a hit, but it gave Burkley a chance to demonstrate his easygoing charm and comedic gifts, and it may have led to him getting some more likable roles.  He had one of his more memorable cop-show ... Read more
about 1 month ago
The art of the TV theme song is a lost one these days. After all, why waste 90 seconds playing music at the beginning of a show when you can just cram in an extra commercial break? But there was a time, my friends, when it seems as much ...
The art of the TV theme song is a lost one these days. After all, why waste 90 seconds playing music at the beginning of a show when you can just cram in an extra commercial break? But there was a time, my friends, when it seems as much care was put into crafting a memorable theme song as was put into writing the show itself. Sometimes even more. So let’s pause for just a moment — not for a word from our sponsors — and remember the golden age of television theme songs. I couldn’t give you an exact date range for this so-called golden age, but do know that the 1970s had an embarrassment of theme song riches. I now offer my selection of the ten best. CHiPs (John Parker) There are a few different flavors of CHiPs to consider. The theme for the first season was sort of a hazy mariachi tune, and the one used afterward (arranged by Alan Silvestri) I refer to as “Disco CHiPs.” Far be it from me to take sides as to which one is better, but yeah, I’m totally taking sides. This song is a thing of a beauty, and shines like Erik Estrada’s teeth. It’s bold, brassy, and has some killer flanged synth. Barney Miller (Jack Elliott and Allyn Ferguson) Admit it, you’re singing that bass line and making the finger motions right now, aren’t you? Of course you are, and for good reason. This grimy slice of funk was reworked several times over the course Barney Miller’s run, but always that bass line — played by prolific studio jazz musician Chuck Berghofer — is there, as dirty as New York City in the ’70s. The Rockford Files (Mike Post and Pete Carpenter) Hmm, Mike Post… now where have I heard that name before in relation to TV theme songs? I’m sure it will come up again when I cover the best themes of the ’80s. But until then, let’s enjoy this kicky, slightly countrified number featuring some lovely period synthesizers. And let’s also not forget that the song was also a legitimate hit, reaching #10 on the Billboard singles chart in the summer of 1975. Sanford and Son (Quincy Jones) Quincy Jones has been many things in his long, illustrious career. Jazz composer and bandleader, producer of hit records, and Grammy Legend. But let’s not forget one of his most awesome contributions to popular culture: the opening theme to the classic Redd Foxx sitcom Sanford and Son, aka “The Streetbeater.” What’s Happening!! (Henry Mancini) I defy you to name another composer who was able to produce two themes as different and yet as equally awesome as Henry Mancini, who composed “The Pink Panther Theme” and this. It can’t be done. WKRP in Cincinnati (Tom Wells and Hugh Wilson) This being a list about the ’70s and all, I’d be remiss if I didn’t include at least one bit of Yacht Rock. And this is about smooth as it gets for shows from that decade. A full-length version of the original theme — as performed by Steve Carlisle — was released in 1981. It peaked at #65 on the Top 100 chart that year and at #29 on the Adult Contemporary chart in early ’82. The Dukes of Hazzard (Waylon Jennings) Even people who hate country music love this song, and for good reason. It’s one of Waylon Jennings’ most tuneful arrangements, and is a ton of fun to sing along to. But I suppose I’m biased, since I think Waylon kicks ass anyway. It also just so happened that ”Theme from The Dukes of Hazzard (Good Ol’ Boys)” became the Outlaw legend’s 12th #1 country hit, as well as nearly cracking the Top 20 of the Hot Singles chart. The Jeffersons (Ja’net Dubois and Jeff Barry) I’m a sucker for good old fashioned gospel, so I just had to include this rafter-shaking theme, which was sung by co-writer Ja’net Dubois with a gospel choir. If this doesn’t get you out of your seat and ready to watch George Jefferson lay into someone, nothin
2 months ago