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Join Becky Stern and friends every week as we delve into the wonderful world of wearables, live on YouTube. We’ll answer your questions, announce a discount code for the Adafruit store, and explore wearable components, techniques, ...
Join Becky Stern and friends every week as we delve into the wonderful world of wearables, live on YouTube. We’ll answer your questions, announce a discount code for the Adafruit store, and explore wearable components, techniques, special materials, and projects you can build at home! Ask your wearables questions in the comments, and if your question is featured, you’ll be entered to win the show giveaway, which this week is a GEMMA, four FLORA NeoPixels, and coincell battery holder! Show links: #WearableWednesday on the Adafruit blog  Space Face LED Galaxy Makeup #ElectronicHalloween Component of the Week: Heart Rate Educational Starter Pack with Polar Wireless Sensors  Beating Heart Brooch  Material Spotlight: Becky’s favorite adhesives! —————————————–Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube Join our weekly Show & Tell on G+ Hangouts On Air Watch our latest project videos New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System —————————————–
about 2 hours ago
Just a few short months ago, 3D printing with stereolithography was an uncommon and very expensive proposition. Consumer-oriented SLA machines such as the Form1 and the B9Creator are as expensive as the upper echelons of squirting plasti...
Just a few short months ago, 3D printing with stereolithography was an uncommon and very expensive proposition. Consumer-oriented SLA machines such as the Form1 and the B9Creator are as expensive as the upper echelons of squirting plastic printers and the community behind these machines isn’t even as diverse as the forums for the fly-by-night printers featured on Kickstarter every week. This may be about to change with last month’s reveal of the Peachy Printer, a remarkably clever stereolithography printer that requires no special equipment, hardly any electronics, and costs $100. Even if the folks behind Peachy never ship a single unit, their clever engineering ensures that stereolithography will be a staple in the makers toolbox in the near future. There is, of course, the problem of material. While plastic filament can be bought  just about everywhere, UV curing resin is a little harder to come by and much more expensive per kilogram or liter. Where then does the stereolithography experimenter get their hands on some of this magical material from the future? Before we get to the article… I’ve been writing a 3D Printing column once a week for a few months now, and I’m running out of ideas. If you have something in the 3D printer world you’d like to see covered in a little more depth than the standard Hackaday post, send in a tip. I’ll send you a few Hackaday stickers if it’s a good idea. This stuff is really complicated Needless to say, the market for SLA resin is a bit complicated. Some printers use DLP projectors, others use lasers. Some printers require a low viscosity resin while in others it doesn’t matter as much. This has a direct effect on what types of resins can be used with which printers. The market is so convoluted there’s no standardized unit of how to sell resin; some sell it by volume, others sell it by mass. For better or worse, the makers behind these SLA printers have stepped in and are selling their own resin. It’s like printer ink! The most expensive resin printer, and by some accounts the best, is the Form 1. While the printer itself is not shipping yet – a result of a few legal problems with a major 3D printer manufacturer – they are selling liters of clear and grey resin for $149. Another printer manufacturer, B9Creator sells their cheapest kilogram of resin for $107. Or go straight to the manufacturers Just because your new Form 1 or B9 came with a specific resin doesn’t mean you can’t experiment with other resins. There are a few light-curing resin manufacturers out there that will sell to any joe off the street. Bucktown Polymers is a name frequently dropped around the RepRap forums, and for good reason: they have UV, visible light, and IR curing resins available in a huge array of colors. Judging from a little research, Bucktown resins are available for about $50 a quart, although for a while earlier this year it seems they were selling it at $220 a gallon (or $55 / quart). Another notable vendor of UV resin is 3D Ink, purveyors of an orange and clear resin priced at about $75 a liter. If versatility in materials is what you’re after (or you simply live in Europe), Spot-A Materials in Spain sells flexible, hard, and elastic resins for between €68 and €78 ($92 to $105 USD) per kilogram. Spot-A also sells dyes for their resins, giving the SLA experimenter a more diverse palette. Judging from price alone, it appears the most innovative resin manufacturer is MakerJuice who offers two resins of varying viscosity and shrink for $40 and $45 per liter. Not only do they also offer pigments, they’ll also pre-mix colors and sell you a quantity smaller than the kilogram/quart/liter other suppliers offer. 500 ml comes to around $25 from MakerJuice, a pittance compared to what UV resins were selling for a few years ago. Now compare this to plastic filament A few weeks ago, we took a look at suppliers for the c
about 2 hours ago
From the forums – HOW-TO – Make a simple jig for reloading the TRINKET bootloader. This is my simple jig that I use with my ISP programmer to reflash the Trinket bootloader. I thought it may be helpful for others. When the T...
From the forums – HOW-TO – Make a simple jig for reloading the TRINKET bootloader. This is my simple jig that I use with my ISP programmer to reflash the Trinket bootloader. I thought it may be helpful for others. When the Trinket is viewed inverted, the connections follow a standard tiny85 DIP with physical pins #1 and #8 most distant from USB connector. See pix (right-click and select open in new tab.) Cut the foam wide enough to create significant expansion in the width of the pins when inserted into the protoboard. Then squeeze to slide the Trinket onto the pins. Move vertically a few times to ensure a good electrical connections. Now use jumper wires to your AVR-ISP programmer or ArduinoISP.
about 3 hours ago
Dan at Maniacal Labs posted a review of our Three Fives kit: … yay for creative kits that cause you to go out and (re)learn stuff! The cool thing about the 555 chip is that it is very much a building block to bigger things. There a...
Dan at Maniacal Labs posted a review of our Three Fives kit: … yay for creative kits that cause you to go out and (re)learn stuff! The cool thing about the 555 chip is that it is very much a building block to bigger things. There are plenty of resources out there for 555 applications and project ideas. I’d like to thank Eric Schlaepfer for his awesome kit idea and Evil Mad Scientist for helping make it available to the masses!
about 3 hours ago
The Leidenfrost Maze was designed and built by University of Bath undergraduate students Carmen Cheng and Matthew Guy to demonstrate the self-propulsion of Leidenfrost droplets at public outreach events and schools. The video was created...
The Leidenfrost Maze was designed and built by University of Bath undergraduate students Carmen Cheng and Matthew Guy to demonstrate the self-propulsion of Leidenfrost droplets at public outreach events and schools. The video was created by Carmen Cheng as part of her undergraduate project.
about 4 hours ago
Via colossal: Banksy’s website updated a few minutes ago to announce Better Out Than In, “an artists residency on the streets of New York.” The ongoing event is accompanied by a phone number (800) 656-4271 that you can call with a ...
Via colossal: Banksy’s website updated a few minutes ago to announce Better Out Than In, “an artists residency on the streets of New York.” The ongoing event is accompanied by a phone number (800) 656-4271 that you can call with a specific code correlating to each artwork. The current recording for #1, shown above, involves a satirical message that completely skewers typical audio tours found in museums and galleries and pokes fun of the artist as well (referring to him repeatedly as “BAN SKY”). Point your browser to banksyny.com for updates.
244 8 days ago
Family Labyrinth Costume.
Family Labyrinth Costume.
about 4 hours ago
Over the last few months, a few very capable hackers have had a hand in cracking open a Transcend WiFi-enable SD card that just happens to be running a small Linux system inside. The possibilities for a wireless Linux device you can lose...
Over the last few months, a few very capable hackers have had a hand in cracking open a Transcend WiFi-enable SD card that just happens to be running a small Linux system inside. The possibilities for a wireless Linux device you can lose in your pocket are immense, but so far no one has gotten any IO enabled on this neat piece of hardware. [CNLohr] just did us all a favor with his motherboard for these Transcend WiFi SD cards, allowing the small Linux systems to communicate with I2C devices. This build is based upon [Dmitry]‘s custom kernel for the Transcend WiFiSD card. [CNLohr] did some poking around with this system and found he could use an AVR to speak to the card in its custom 4-bit protocol. The ‘motherboard’ consists of some sort of ATMega, an AVR programming header, a power supply, and a breakout for the I2C bus. [Lohr] wired up a LED array to the I2C bus and used it to display some configuration settings for the WiFi card before connecting to the card over WiFi and issuing commands directly to the Linux system on the card. The end result was, obviously, a bunch of blinking LEDs. While this is by far the most complex and overwrought way to blink a LED we’ve ever seen, this is a great proof of concept that makes the Transcend cards extremely interesting for a variety of hardware projects. If you want your own Transcend motherboard, [CNLohr] put all the files up for anyone who wants to etch their own board. Filed under: hardware, linux hacks, wireless hacks
about 5 hours ago
? ABB robot captures movement with Microsoft Kinect and creates a work of art – YouTube. At Futur en Seine in France, ENSCI Engineering school presented the results of a year of reflection on robots, their role in manufacturing an...
? ABB robot captures movement with Microsoft Kinect and creates a work of art – YouTube. At Futur en Seine in France, ENSCI Engineering school presented the results of a year of reflection on robots, their role in manufacturing and their place in our daily lives. This exposition was from 13 to 16 June this year. Of the projects presented by ENSCI and its FabLab, one in particular captured the spotlight. Each visitor who wished could be “captured” by a small robot based on the project designed by students Paul Couderc, Xavier Dufour Thimothé Montoy. From a Microsoft Kinect device that was capturing the image at time T, each person was reproduced by an ABB robot with a black felt pen. The concept was a great success with visitors, who selected it to receive the Audience Award. This award recognized the robot and at the same time the work of students from ENSCI School.
about 6 hours ago
Dr_Speed completed the GEMMA + NeoPixel ring pendant project! Gemma board, Neopixel ring and LiPo battery for animated necklace pendant.Runs for hours on this battery, very bright. Only 3 wires to solder to get the hardware going. A bit...
Dr_Speed completed the GEMMA + NeoPixel ring pendant project! Gemma board, Neopixel ring and LiPo battery for animated necklace pendant.Runs for hours on this battery, very bright. Only 3 wires to solder to get the hardware going. A bit of work to get this cross compiling on OSX, you have to do a bit of monkeying around to get the IDE going with the Gemma and you need to replace the ld.exe to get the sketch/library to work. The Gemma and NeoPixel ring are from Adafruit and LiPo battery and charger (not shown) are from Sparkfun. GEMMA Hoop Earrings (or pendant) Every Wednesday is Wearable Wednesday here at Adafruit! We’re bringing you the blinkiest, most fashionable, innovative, and useful wearables from around the web and in our own original projects featuring our wearable Arduino-compatible platform, FLORA. Be sure to post up your wearables projects in the forums or send us a link and you might be featured here on Wearable Wednesday!
about 6 hours ago